Biological Species

Frogpocalypse Now

America seen from a satellite at night blooms with lights, up one coast, down the other, and all across the middle. If you ­focus on the lights of South Florida and then move in closer on a metro area—say, Naples or ­Miami or West Palm Beach—and then zoom in on a particular mall or commercial strip …

Biodiversity

Rare California frogs of Mark Twain lore are having sex again, to the delight of wildlife researchers

Before the California red-legged frog all but vanished decades ago from the streams and mountains outside Los Angeles, the amphibian and its impressive leaping abilities were immortalized in American literature.<p>In 1865, a young Mark Twain wrote “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” a …

Biodiversity

Study reveals mass extinction event 35 million years ago

Australian National University biologists have found the first evidence of mass extinction of Australian animals caused by a dramatic drop in global …

Biodiversity

Increase in crocodile attacks? People living near predators will always be at some risk

Whenever crocodiles and humans overlap, there will be a risk of attack – but culling is not the answer.<p>In northern Australia, you are never more than …

Biodiversity

New Frog Species: Check Out This Colorful Frog Scientists Found In Ecuador

Scientists studying an endangered frog got a pleasant surprise when they discovered a new species entirely.<p>A study in <i>PLOS One</i> describes the new kid …

Biodiversity

Bee expert discusses bumblebee, now officially listed as endangered

Populations of the rusty patched bumblebee, a once-common bee species, have dramatically declined during the past three decades. Many scientists who …

Biodiversity

This Is the First-Ever Video of the Elusive True’s Beaked Whale in the Wild

<b>An international team of researchers recently captured the first underwater video of True’s beaked whales in the wild.</b> The notoriously mysterious …

Life Sciences

Alligators in Augusta not your biggest worry, wildlife officials say

Imagine for a moment that several different animals are standing in a row, and you need to pick the most dangerous. In the lineup are a shiny green …

Biodiversity

Saiga antelopes much more flexible than originally thought

Senckenberg scientists have discovered that the Saiga Antelope, which is currently threatened with extinction, used to be much more flexible in its …

Biodiversity

Are otters smarter than dolphins? Scientists investigate

Dolphins get a lot of attention for their smarts. They’ve long been lauded as one of the world’s most intelligent animals. But new research suggests …

Lifestyle

Could conservation provide ground for peace in conflict zones?

Some things, like birds, transcend political boundaries. That's why some scientists say conservation of the natural world could promote peace among …

Biodiversity

Discovery of new ginger species spices up African wildlife surveys

Scientists from WCS have discovered a new species of wild ginger, spicing up a wave of recent wildlife discoveries in the Kabobo Massif - a rugged, …

Biodiversity

Biologists say wolf spiders have a wider range of personality than once believed

Charming might not be the best way to describe a spider, but researchers at the University of Cincinnati are finding a wide spectrum of personality …

Biodiversity

Livestock grazing effects on sage-grouse

Effects of livestock grazing on greater sage-grouse populations can be positive or negative depending on the amount of grazing and when grazing …

Biodiversity

Strong interaction between herbivores and plants

A research project conducted at the University of Cologne's Zoological Institute reveals important findings on the interaction between nutrient …

Biodiversity

Rare 'Snakes from Hell' Lurk Near Petrochemical Plant in Ecuador

A secretive new ground snake gets a mythology-inspired name.

Biodiversity

Koalas don't like water but they're being 'driven to drink' by climate change

Koalas have what some would consider the dream life: Eating and sleeping all day.<p>When they're awake they eat leaves, which is their complete source of nourishment. But fun fact: Koalas don't drink water. At least, they didn't used to, except in extreme cases.<p>But thanks to climate change, our …

Biodiversity

Graphene layers give colourful warning

We're <b>improving Research Highlights</b> and need your help.<br>Have a look and tell us what you think.<p>Materials<p>A material made of overlapping layers of …

Animal Behavior

Japan Declares Red Coral Species Extinct

Japan’s Ogasawara red coral is now extinct and 56 marine species are endangered, according to a new list of threatened species released by the Japanese Ministry of the Environment, <i>Japan Times</i> reports.<p>The so-called red list categorizes animals as extinct, critically endangered, endangered and …

Biodiversity

Time to Manage Menhaden Ecologically

The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission has the chance this year to adopt a plan to safeguard populations of this vital little fish.<p>Fish …

Biodiversity

Why would beetles want to look, act and smell like army ants? To eat them, of course

Army ant colonies are home to a treasure trove of raided food and helpless juveniles that other insects would love to feed on. But one does not simply walk into an army ant colony and start eating.<p>Ill-prepared intruders would face swarms of aggressive ants eager to defend their nest. That’s why …

Biodiversity

Top 10 Venomous Snakes to Look Out for on a Hunting Trip

Venomous snakes, to me, are what I imagine grizzly bears to be to folks who don’t live in Alaska. Living up here, I can casually traipse through any …

Zoology

How long until all species are named after David Attenborough?

A 430m-year-old fossilised shrimp from Herefordshire has become the latest species to be named after the broadcaster, joining the pygmy locust, semi-slug, rubber frog, Amazonian butterfly ...<p>When he was a boy, Sir David Attenborough supposedly had an impressive collection of fossils. These days, …

Biodiversity

How Galápagos giant tortoises have made a comeback

As many as 300,000 giant tortoises once roamed the Galápagos Islands, but that number went down by about 90 percent. Here's a rundown of innovative …

Biodiversity

We Just Found a New Frog in Ecuador It is Spectacular

Biologists studying a threatened species of South American rain frog ended up discovering an entirely different species of rain frog, and presumably …

Biodiversity

The world’s first luminous frog has been discovered in Argentina

<b>The world’s first fluorescent frog has been discovered in Argentina. Scientists say the South American polka dot tree frog, which measures three centimetres long, is the first legitimate evidence of a glow-in-the-dark amphibian. Researchers from Bernardino Rivadavia Natural Sciences Museum and the</b> …

Biodiversity

If You Want to Live Longer Get a Dog

Source: Racchlo photo - Creative Commons License<p>Our health-conscious society is always looking for ways to improve our longevity. The usual …

Animal Behavior

Tool use by sea otters has little to do with genetic ties: Smithsonian study

Tool use by sea otters to break open well-armored food is not necessarily a family matter, according to a new study published this week by the …

Biodiversity

The rapid spread of Australia's cane toad pests

<b>They are toxic invaders that have conquered swathes of northern Australia as they continue their seemingly irrepressible march west towards the Indian Ocean.</b><p>Packed with poison and supremely adaptable, the dreaded cane toad, or Bufo marinus, has few friends in Australia, where a massive scientific …

Biodiversity

Can the Amazon of Southeast Asia Be Saved?

Phnom Penh, Cambodia<p>The Mekong River Basin supports millions of people and some of the world’s richest biodiversity, but it must overcome many threats.<p>Zeb Hogan recalls the sense of wonder he felt when, as a fresh-eyed fish biologist, he first came to Southeast Asia some 20 years ago and …

Biodiversity