Big Ideas

Ben Stiller, Aisha Tyler, and Terry Crews share what they learned from their most spectacular failures

<i>“You will fall. And when you fall, the winner always gets up, and the loser stays down.” —Arnold Schwarzenegger</i><p>My first book, <i>The 4-Hour Workweek</i>, was rejected 27 times by publishers. It wasn’t supposed to work. It was supposed to fail. And for a while I did fail—repeatedly—to get it published. But …

Success

What can insomniacs learn from sleep crises of centuries past? Eat onions.

Most developed societies in the West are currently plagued by endemic sleep loss, falling well short of the eight hours recommended by the World Health Organization. In particular, many children and young people are currently suffering from sleeping problems. A recent BBC documentary went so far as …

Sleep

Don’t blame opioids for the opioid crisis—doctors must become better at pain management

In the midst of a devastating opioid epidemic that has wrought addiction, despair and death in communities all over the country, the medical and scientific communities are reacting by questioning not only the prescription of opioids for treating pain, but the very treatment of pain itself.<p>This …

Pain

Basic Income Experiments—The Devil's in the Caveats | Basic Income News

<i>The devil’s in the details</i> is a common saying about policy proposals. Perhaps we need a similar saying for policy <i>research</i>, something like <i>the devil’s</i> …

Basic Income

A psychologist explains the best ways to cope with conflict over the holidays

It’s the holiday season, time for family gatherings, happiness, and good cheer. It’s also the time for your smiling brother to sit across from you at the dinner table and comment on on how your favorite politician is corrupt and anyone who supports him is delusional.<p>At least 29 religious holidays …

Psychology

The emotional benefits of small talk outweigh your fear of being awkward

At an early age, you’re taught not to talk to strangers. Originally meant to protect us from childhood harm, this rule follows most of us into adulthood.<p>We keep to ourselves in public places. We avert our eyes on public transport. We stand frozen in the corners of cocktail parties and extended …

Psychology

Where unsellable wine goes to die

The first thing you notice is the smell. An acrid eau-de-wet-garbage mixed with electrical fire and burning diesel. <i>Mad Max</i> meets scratch and sniff.<p>Breweries and distilleries have a distinct aroma, like moist bread. The backrooms of gin distilleries can fill with the scent of cardamom and juniper …

Drinking

How Putin Matters

The always-insightful American journalist Christopher Caldwell says he doesn’t intend to tell people what to think about Vladimir Putin, but rather …

Conservative View

Can herbal hormone therapy help the transgender community?

I remember when someone first told me about Black Cohosh. It’ll help with your cramps, they said, and it regulates hormones. (That someone may have …

Technology

Why philosophy is so important in science education

Each semester, I teach courses on the philosophy of science to undergraduates at the University of New Hampshire. Most of the students take my courses to satisfy general education requirements, and most of them have never taken a philosophy class before.<p>On the first day of the semester, I try to …

Education

Bionic devices turn humans into superstrong workers

Exoskeleton technology first appeared in medical uses, but now it's breaking into workplaces like factories

The Future

Catholic Ideology

It may seem rather odd for a Catholic to juxtapose these two terms, to place the Faith alongside a word that’s most often taken to mean a misguided …

Religion

Neuroscientists have identified how exactly a deep breath changes your mind

Breathing is traditionally thought of as an automatic process driven by the brainstem—the part of the brain controlling such life-sustaining functions as heartbeat and sleeping patterns. But new and unique research, involving recordings made directly from within the brains of humans undergoing …

The Brain

Xiaomi founder Lei Jun interview: ‘Make in India a visionary programme, we are encouraging our suppliers to set up factories in India

Written by Nandagopal Rajan |<p>Xiaomi founder and CEO Lei Jun at his company’s Bangalore office. (Express photo by Nandagopal Rajan)<p><i>The name Lei Jun</i> …

Technology (India)

The Observer view on Philip Hammond’s budget

The chancellor must finally banish the ghost of George Osborne and help the poor<p>At every opportunity, Theresa May has emphasised how much she wants her premiership to represent a break from the pre-Brexit past. From her first public words as prime minister on the steps of Downing Street, to her …

Economics

Tech Startup expert Eric Ries launches new book in London

Eric Ries, author of the Lean Startup spoke at London’s How to Academy on November 15. His latest book “The Startup Way” has just been published. In …

Eric Ries

The agony and joy of being gay in Africa

At an international conference on Black portraiture, imagery and depiction in Johannesburg, South Africa last November, I gave a presentation about the state of LGBT rights across the African continent. I told participants that I’d just come from New York, where, at the UN, the African bloc had …

LGBTQ

The one man in America who continues to be “safe” from sexual harassment allegations is the president

Nobody can deny the ground has shifted in America. Formerly invincible men are tumbling one by one as victims come out with their stories of sexual assault. Some, like Harvey Weinstein, were already fading from power, but others, like Louis CK, were still at the height of it.<p>Yet one man continues …

Feminism

The Toughest Part About Innovation Is Not What You Think

Technology alone cannot drive change<p>Stories of innovation usually follow a simple, but common narrative. Someone gets an idea, figures out how to make it work and changes the world. Yet that is rarely how it actually happens. Far more often, someone comes up with a great idea and it never gets off …

Innovation

Science has outgrown the human mind

<i>The duty of man who investigates the writings of scientists, if learning the truth is his goal, is to make himself an enemy of all that he reads and… attack it from every side. He should also suspect himself as he performs his critical examination of it, so that he may avoid falling into either</i> …

Scientific Research

Keene's fledgling biotech incubator lands its first startup

Gene Garcia is a fan of raw milk. Drinking it seems to help his son’s allergies, he says. To him, it’s healthier than the pasteurized stuff and can …

Startups

The dangerous data hack that you won’t even notice

A recent wave of cyberattacks—from WannaCry and Equifax to the alleged Russian influence on the US election—has demonstrated how hackers can wreak havoc on our largest institutions. But by focusing only on hackers’ efforts to extort money or mess with our political process, we may have been missing …

Medicine

America’s rising white nationalism calls for a new type of civil rights leadership

In the months following the election of Donald Trump, the US has witnessed levels of racial conflict unseen in decades. White supremacist rallies have increased in cities across the country and hate crimes are on the rise (pdf). The resurgence of white nationalism is in part a backlash to the …

Racism

The cost of saving the world is $40 per ton of carbon. Here’s what that means.

This week, diplomats are gathered in Bonn, Germany to hammer out the latest details of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement. While the minutiae of the negotiations are important, the real action isn’t at the UN. The climate pact is bottom up, which means it’s up to each country to meet the goals set …

Climate

Intel moves into 5G wireless technology and a potential partnership with Apple - MarketWatch

Intel this week unveiled products in the mobile connectivity device segment.<p>The Intel XMM 8000-series of 5G-capable modems will bring the next …

Mobile Technology

The day I quit journalism

<i>I was frustrated by newspapers’ glacial transition to the web. Now I wish we could turn back the clock.</i><p>It was the summer of 2005, and I was a new college grad filled with anticipation and glee as I packed for the long trip from my childhood hometown to my brilliant, prosperous, tech-savvy …

Journalism

The myth of political parties

<i>“There is nothing which I dread so much as a division of the republic into two great parties, each arranged under its leader, and concerting measures</i> …

Conservative View

The unique kind of prison awaiting Robert Mugabe in South Africa

If deposed Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe is indeed forced into exile in South Africa, as has been proposed, he will be escaping to a less fortunate circumstance than you’d imagine.<p>While he may avoid jail, public humiliation, or worse in South Africa, he would be fleeing to a country …

Africa

Antibiotic abuse is on track to kill more people than cancer and diabetes. Can food help?

England’s Chief Medical Officer Dame Sally Davies recently made headlines around the world when she again warned of an impending “post-antibiotic apocalypse.” Sounding no less disastrous, the World Health Organization has said that we’re “heading towards a post-antibiotic era, in which many common …

Medicine

UW receives top honors from CleanTech Alliance for research and support in energy innovation, industry partnerships

UW News<p>The CleanTech Alliance has presented the University of Washington with the organization’s 2017 CleanTech Achievement Award. The honor …

Clean Technology