Evidence-Based Medicine

How cold water could save patients from almost certain death

Surgeon pioneers procedure that sends body temperature plummeting.<p>For more than 50 years, doctors have sought to exploit the protective effects of cold on the human body, and therapeutic hypothermia to chill a patient's body temperature by a few degrees is now used for conditions ranging from heart …

Medicine

China Has Already Gene-Edited 86 People With CRISPR

In the U.S., the first planned clinical trials of CRISPR gene editing in people are about to kick off. China, meanwhile, has been racing ahead, …

Genetics

Making Age Spots a Thing of the Past

Aging can bring unwelcome surprises, like crusty brown spots that gradually appear on your face, neck or trunk.<p>They’re called unflattering names: age spots, barnacles or, God help us, senile warts, but physicians know them as seborrheic keratosis lesions, or SK lesions, for short. They come in as …

Medicine

Stanford scientists invent AI that can predict death with up to 90% accuracy

Humans today live a lot longer than they used to. That’s great news, but as modern medical advances are giving patients second chances at living …

Machine Learning

Why Flesh-Eating Bacteria Can Look Like the Flu

An Arizona woman who was initially diagnosed with the flu turned out to have a life-threating infection with "flesh-eating" bacteria, according to …

Medicine

Man Blames 5-Foot Tapeworm on Sushi

By Carl Engelking | January 22, 2018 1:20 pm<p><i>(Credit: Shutterstock)</i><p>A Fresno, Calif. man is rethinking his diet after one of his favorite dishes came …

Medicine

New cellulose could cut fuel costs and treat infections - Futurity

A new kind of cellulose from E. Coli could be useful in medical applications and for making cheaper ethanol.

E.coli

We May Finally Know The Cause of Polio-Like Illness Paralysing Children Around The World

The outbreaks started in 2014.<p>For decades, cases were rare. A virus called enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) popped up only sporadically, causing mild …

Public Health

Computational method speeds hunt for new antibiotics

A team of American and Russian computer scientists has developed an algorithm that can rapidly search massive databases to discover novel variants of …

Biology

Researchers develop reliable and needle-free HIV test

Researchers at Stanford have created a hassle-free HIV test. The new test will enable health officials to screen large numbers of people and stem …

Medicine

Breakthrough in restoring vision: Genes from algae could cure blindness

Blindness can be treated by inserting algae gene into people's eyes.<p>An innovative gene therapy, which has been invented by a French biopharma …

Molecular Biology

A Man Has Become The First Patient in The World to Receive a Second Face Transplant

His first was rejected.<p>Twelve years ago, a team of surgeons in France successfully completed the first-ever face transplant procedure. Unfortunately, …

Medicine

When A Tattoo Means Life Or Death. Literally.

The man was unconscious and alone when he arrived at University of Miami Hospital last summer. He was 70 years old and gravely ill.<p>"Originally, we were told he was intoxicated," remembers Dr. Gregory Holt, an emergency room doctor, "but he didn't wake up."<p>"He wasn't breathing well. He had COPD. …

News

This Man Ate Salmon Sashimi Every Day Until a Tapeworm Slithered Out of His Body

Warning: This is a little disturbing.<p>He told an emergency room physician he had a liking for raw fish – specifically, salmon sashimi.<p>It's what the …

Medicine

Sushi-Obsessed Man Pulls 5-Foot Tapeworm Out of His Rectum

It came "wiggling out."<p>The revolution will not be televised. It'll be sent to your inbox by us.<p>You might want to put down whatever you’re eating …

Fish

World moves closer to eradicating Guinea worm disease

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — A new report says the world is moving closer to eradicating Guinea worm disease, in which a meter-long worm slowly emerges from a blister in a person's skin.<p>The Carter Center, which leads the eradication campaign, says just 30 cases were reported last year in isolated areas of …

World News

A Toxic Plant Might Help Us Find a Legit Male Birth Control Drug

The quest to find an effective male birth control pill is like Charlie Brown from “Peanuts” trying to kick the football: Always seemingly within …

Medicine

How Do You Die from the Flu?

This year's flu season is off to a killer start — literally. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that rates of …

Public Health

This Popular Household Plant Keeps Seriously Damaging People's Eardrums

Wha?<p>A team of doctors in Australia has noticed an unexpected pattern of ear trauma in their patients over the past few years - and the culprit has …

Gardening

New AI System Predicts How Long Patients Will Live With Startling Accuracy

By using an artificially intelligent algorithm to predict patient mortality, a research team from Stanford University is hoping to improve the timing …

Medicine

Boy's Strange Choking Episode: What Is Eosinophilic Esophagitis?

A 14-year old boy in Missouri who appeared to choke on a ham and cheese sandwich turned out to have a rare immune condition that can injure the …

Medicine

Gov't scientists scramble to save research ahead of shutdown

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's premier medical research institute is in "a scramble" to prepare for a partial government shutdown that could ruin costly experiments and leave sick patients unable to enter cutting-edge studies, Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health said …

U.S. Politics

Flu Season Has Exposed Life-Threatening Flaws in Medical Supply Chains

By Morten Wendelbo and Christine Crudo Blackburn | January 19, 2018 10:18 am<p>Flu season in the U.S. typically peaks in February, but this year’s …

Medicine

This Spiny Plant Is Sending People to the Emergency Room

The sharp, spiny leaves of the yucca — a trendy plant found in gardens the world over — has caused serious ear injuries that have sent more than two …

Medicine

Robotic implant made to treat birth defect

Oesophageal atresia is a rare genetic disease, in which the upper and lower sections of a baby's oesophagus don't connect – there's a gap between …

Breakthroughs

Doctors are warning people not to hold in sneezes after a man tore a hole in his throat and was hospitalized for 7 days

• <b>A 34-year-old man was hospitalized for a week after he attempted to hold his mouth and nose closed to stop a sneeze, and wound up tearing a hole in his throat.</b>• <b><br>Doctors say that while such an incident is rare, no one should hold in a sneeze.</b>• <b><br>Here's expert advice for the right way to sneeze.</b><p>Doctors are …

Medicine

Ancient African arrow poison inspires prospective male contraceptive

Over half a century after the female birth control pill arguably kickstarted a sexual revolution, men still don't have an equivalent drug-based …

Contraception

Breathing in a nanoparticle spray could prevent heart damage

Some deep breaths could soon treat heart failure – the deterioration of the heart following a heart attack – thanks to an inhalable spray that has …

Medicine

Breakthrough enables screening millions of human antibodies for new drug discovery

Limitations of previous approaches were a major motivating factor leading to the development of the new technology for screening native antibody …

Medicine

Inhalation of peptide-loaded nanoparticles improves heart failure

A puff of particles for the heart<p>Nanoparticles can be useful for imaging and drug delivery but generally require intravenous injection to reach their …

Medicine