Anthropology

Butchered human bones point to cannibalism in Mesolithic Spain 10,000 years ago

Humans may have eaten each other in southern Spain, during the Mesolithic era.<p>Human bones and skulls discovered in a cave in southern Spain bear …

Humanity

Archaeologists Have Found Evidence of Cannibalism in Spain 10,000 Years Ago

Ancient feast or funeral?<p>Times were tough in Stone Age Europe, so it's not surprising that every now and then we find ancient <i>Homo sapiens</i> bones …

Humanity

400,000 year-old 'Neanderthal' fossil discovered by archaeologists

Archaeologists have found a 400,000 year-old fossil which is believed to be related to Neanderthals.<p>On the last day of an expedition to the Gruta da …

Humanity

A diet of fish and dead at 40: Scientists reconstruct face and life of man who lived 700 years ago

The face of a man who died more than 700 years ago has been revealed for the first time, and experts believe he particularly liked meat or …

Archaeology

Climate shaped the human nose, researchers say

Variations in nose shape developed as a result of natural selection in response to different climates, new study suggests<p>Human noses have been shaped by climate, according to research probing variation in the human snout.<p>Researchers say their findings back up the theory that wider nostrils …

Biology

Neanderthals Munched On 'Aspirin' And Woolly Rhinos

A new analysis reveals that some, but not all, Neanderthals were meat lovers.<p>Neanderthals once dined on woolly rhinoceroses and wild sheep, and even self-medicated with painkillers and antibiotics, according to a new analysis of their dental plaque.<p>But the diets of Neanderthals — the closest known …

Humanity

Neanderthal Used Early Version of Penicillin and Aspirin

WASHINGTON — Eating like a caveman meant chowing down on woolly rhinos and sheep in Belgium, but munching on mushrooms, pine nuts and moss in Spain. It all depended on where they lived, new research shows.<p>Scientists got a sneak peek into the kitchen of three Neanderthals by scraping off the plaque …

Humanity

How Did Aborigines Get to Australia? DNA Helps Solve a Mystery

Human skeletons and archaeological remains in Australia can be traced back nearly 50,000 years before the trail disappears. Before then, apparently, Australia was free of humans.<p>So how did people get there, and when? Where did humans first arrive on the continent, and how did they spread across the …

Humanity

Dental plaque DNA shows Neanderthals used 'aspirin'

Ancient DNA found in the dental plaque of Neandertals -- our nearest extinct relative -- has provided remarkable new insights into their behavior, …

Humanity

If you think the Amazon jungle is completely wild, think again

Welcome to the somewhat civilized jungle. Plant cultivation by native groups has shaped the landscape of at least part of South America’s Amazon …

Humanity

Ancient human tree cultivation shaped Amazon landscape

By Will Dunham<p>WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Ancient indigenous peoples had a far more profound impact on the composition of the vast Amazon rainforest than …

Forests

100,000-year-old human skulls from east Asia reveal complex mix of trends in time, space

Two partial archaic human skulls, from the Lingjing site, Xuchang, central China, provide a new window into the biology and populations patterns of …

Humanity

Investigating Olduvai CD-ROM. Archaeology of Human Origins

The earliest archaeological evidence for proto-human behavior is often difficult for students to understand from textbooks and lectures alone. I …

Archaeology

How the world made us: chance and climate in the human story

<b>The Cradle of Humanity: How the changing landscape of Africa made us so smart by Mark Maslin, Oxford University Press</b><p>THE story of our 2-million-year …

Climate Change

Remains of extinct 'zebra-like horse' found at Denisova cave, home of ancient man

<b>Denisova Cave in Altai region was home to three species of ancient man, Homo sapiens, Neanderthals and Denisovans. Picture: The Siberian Times</b><p>The …

Humanity

How Coherent Is the Human Evolution Story?

"Australopithocines evolved into <i>Homo erectus</i> around 1.5 million years ago and <i>Homo erectus</i>, in turn, evolved into <i>Homo sapiens</i> around 400,000 years …

Humanity

Shakeups Continue among Human Evolutionary Candidates

The theory of human evolution is taking yet another hit from recent scientific studies, from the first analysis of the Neandertal genome to …

Prehistory

DNA Study Contradicts Human/Chimp Common Ancestry

Evolutionary biologists argue that since human and chimp DNA are nearly identical, both species must have evolved from a common ancestor. However, …

Genetics

Looking at Sardinian DNA for genetic clues to an island's - and Europe's - past

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND EVOLUTION (OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS)—Sardinia sits at a crossroads in the Mediterranean Sea, the second largest island next to …

Humanity

Why Haven't We Found Civilizations Older Than 7,000 - 8,000 years?

(AP Photo/Tsafrir Abayov)<p><i>Why haven’t we found civilizations older than 7 – 8 thousand years when homo sapiens evolved around 200 000 years ago? originally appeared on Quora:</i> <i>the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world</i>.<p><b>Answer by Adam</b> …

Humanity

Facial Reconstruction of Medieval Man Sheds Light on England’s “Ordinary Poor”

The man known as Context 958 spent his last days in the Hospital of St. John the Evangelist, a home for the destitute in medieval England. He died …

Archaeology

New research shakes up dinosaur family tree

Tyrannosaurus rex and his buddies could be on the move as a new study proposes a massive shake-up of the dinosaur family tree.<p>Scientists who took a deeper look at dinosaur fossils suggest a different evolutionary history for dinosaurs, moving meat-eating theropods such as T. rex to a new branch of …

Dinosaurs

San People of South Africa Issue Code of Ethics for Researchers

Earlier this month, three groups of San people in South Africa issued what is believed to be the first code of research ethics put together by …

South Africa

Half of All Languages Come from One Root Language. How it Spread Is Something of Debate

The sheer variety of languages on Earth is dizzying in their array and divergence. What’s more intriguing, is that about half of them spoken today by …

Humanity

Dinosaur Family Tree Questioned By New Study Which Moves Dinosaur Origin To Northern Hemisphere

For the past 130 years or so, the taxonomy of dinosaurs has been more or less firmly divided into two orders, Ornithischia and Saurischia, each of …

Dinosaurs

Some farmers in Roman Empire converted to Hun lifestyle

Analysis of isotopes in bones and teeth from fifth-century cemeteries suggests that nomadic Huns and Pannonian settlers on the frontier of Roman …

Humanity

A Brief History of Domesticated Rabbits

It may have been Pope Gregory I (540 to 604 A.D.) that led to the domestication of the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) back in the year 600. …

Wildlife

Practising pastoralism in an agricultural environment: An isotopic analysis of the impact of the Hunnic incursions on Pannonian populations

by Susanne E. Hakenbeck, Jane Evans, Hazel Chapman, Erzsébet FóthiWe conducted a multi-isotope study of five fifth-century AD cemeteries in …

Humanity

The evolutionary and phylogeographic history of woolly mammoths: a comprehensive mitogenomic analysis

Article |<p>Open<p>Dan Chang<br>• , Michael Knapp<br>• , Jacob Enk<br>• , Sebastian Lippold<br>• , Martin Kircher<br>• , Adrian Lister<br>• , Ross D. E. MacPhee<br>• , Christopher Widga<br>• , Paul …

Humanity

Homo Sapiens

<i>Homo sapiens</i> (‘wise man’), or modern humans, are the only species of human still around today. Despite having invented countless ways of labelling …

Humanity