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Why Tackling Corruption Is So Urgent—and So Difficult

Corruption knows no geographic boundaries, and its impact is devastating, particularly for developing countries. While recent revelations of massive corruption have made the issue a high priority for voters, the obstacles to effectively tackling corruption can prove to be persistent. That, in turn, can lead to popular disenchantment with leaders and democratic processes.

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    • Corruption
    • Latin America
    • Income Inequality
    • World Politics
    • Foreign Policy
Why Tackling Corruption Is So Urgent—and So Difficult
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    Ramaphosa’s Anti-Graft Credentials Just Took Another Hit at a Bad Time

    Ramaphosa’s Anti-Graft Credentials Just Took Another Hit at a Bad Time

    On the eve of the battle to save his presidency, Ramaphosa could face the prospect of legal jeopardy over the Farmgate scandal, as well as political uncertainty.

    The Politics and Practice of Fighting Corruption

    Whether in electoral backlashes or popular protests, voters increasingly make their outrage over corruption known.

    To Address Inequality and Poverty, Start By Tackling Corruption

    To Address Inequality and Poverty, Start By Tackling Corruption

    The Challenge of Tackling Corruption

    Politicians have been quick to capitalize on the appeal of anti-corruption rhetoric on the campaign trail. But once in office, the obstacles to effectively tackling corruption can prove to be persistent.

    The Backlash Against Anti-Corruption Efforts

    As entrenched elites find themselves in the crosshairs of effective investigators, they often fight back to protect their ill-gotten privileges.

    The Potential Abuses of Anti-Corruption Efforts

    Because corruption is universally considered a scourge, it is often easy to mobilize public opinion against it. But that can allow ruthless political leaders to use anti-corruption efforts to purge rivals or crack down on dissent.

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