UC Health

By University of California | At the University of California we are driven by our public service mission to take health care innovations to the next level. With health, there's hope.

Breast-Feeding the Microbiome

<i>This is an edited excerpt from “</i><i>I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life</i><i>,” which will be published on August 9th by Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.</i><p>The Foods for Health Institute, at the University of California, Davis, has the appearance of a Tuscan …

Microbiome

Using urban pigeons to monitor lead pollution

Quick summary• Pigeons in New York City had similar pattern of lead in blood to children<br>• ‘Rats with wings’ could be a tool to survey urban pollution<br>​<p>Tom Lehrer sang about poisoning them, but those pigeons in the park might be a good way to detect lead and other toxic compounds in cities. A new study …

Pollution

How Salmonella Could Be Used to Kill Cancer

A genetically modified strain of the bacteria has successfully planted drugs in mice tumors.<p><i>Salmonella</i> bacteria are best known as a causes of food poisoning and typhoid fever. Every year, they sicken millions of people. But those in Jeff Hasty’s lab at the University of California, San Diego, are …

Cancer

Confronting a Lingering Question About Zika: How It Enters the Womb

As scientists learn more about how the Zika virus can cause brain damage in a developing fetus, a major question has remained: How does a virus that infects a pregnant mother through a mosquito bite on her skin get into her womb?<p>It is not a simple question. Most viruses that infect a pregnant woman …

Science

Smarter Ways to Teach Family Members Medical Skills

As hospitals send patients home after shorter stays and many patients live with multiple chronic diseases, more families are taking on complicated medical tasks. That includes giving injections, changing surgical dressings and operating special medical equipment, often with little instruction.<p>An …

Medicine

How cochlear implants help profoundly deaf children

Quick summary• Cochlear implants support hearing in profoundly deaf people<br>• ‘Balance of power’ between brain areas may affect how effective implants are<br>• Goal is to find ways to help kids better adapt to implants<p>William Wootton was born profoundly deaf, but thanks to cochlear implants fitted when he was …

UC Berkeley

UCLA researchers develop immunotherapy to treat advanced brain cancer

UCLA researchers have developed a new cancer treatment that uses a vaccine to activate an immune response against advanced brain tumors.<p>The three-year study led by UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center members and doctors Robert Prins, Linda Liau and Timothy Cloughesy, showed for the first time …

Cancer

Thinking beyond the drinking water fountain

School children drink more water if the traditional water fountain is replaced by a dispenser with cups, according to findings of a study led by researchers at UC San Francisco.<p>In the study, published today (July 7) in Preventing Chronic Disease, researchers compared water intake over a four-month …

Drinking water

Countdown to a cure: UCSF's effort to finally defeat AIDS

The sun, barely penetrating the summer fog, dully illuminated the hallways of San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH) on July 1, 1981, as Paul Volberding, M.D., started his first day of rounds and met his first patient as a UCSF faculty member. For Volberding, that day and that patient are …

Health

and Tobacco-Free Student Fellows

It’s been two years since the University of California went smoke and tobacco free on its campuses, but not everyone knows or abides by the rules.<p>UCLA undergraduate Elaine Chung wants to change that: As one of UC’s first Smoke- and Tobacco-Free Student Fellows, she plans to spend the coming year …

UC Berkeley

Poison's drummer recovering from cancer after UCSD therapy

Instead of planning gigs with his band, Poison drummer Rikki Rockett found himself fighting for his life last summer. Rockett was diagnosed with …

Cancer

Hundreds of companies in the U.S. are selling unproven stem cell treatments, study says

Have your weekly pickup basketball games left you with pain in your knees that just won’t go away? Do you suffer from chest pain, lung disease or kidney failure? Has an accident left you with partial paralysis? Or, would you like to have a more rewarding sex life?<p>If any of these conditions — or …

Science

5 Questions For: Malcom Potts, UC Berkeley Professor of Public Health

Nick Fiske<b>1. You’ve been at the forefront of family planning debates for many years and are now working to bring to market an over-the-counter birth</b> …

Public Health

This Gene-Editing Technology Will Change the World. But Who Gets the Credit?

AstraZeneca and Novartis have teamed up with Crispr startups to develop and bring drugs to market. Beyond cures, Crispr is being viewed as a way to …

Patents

Focus: Bright minds battling dark diseases

San Diego helps lead way as life sciences evolves, expands

Biology

Hospitals look to technology to communicate, reduce errors

Even in this digital age, doctors may have no idea that the patient they just saw in the emergency department showed up in another hospital’s ER …

Hospitals

Even $20 meals can sway doctors, study finds

Physician influence can be bought for as little as a $20 meal, UCSF researchers have found.<p>In a study published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, the researchers found that doctors who received just one meal averaging $20 were up to twice as likely to prescribe brand-name drugs being promoted than …

Pharma

Why Are Health Studies So White?

Some researchers blame distrust for the lack of diversity in clinical trials; others want to change medicine’s approach.<p>Illyasha Peete spent the first years of her son’s life listening to his whistling breaths on the pillow next to her.<p>“I was always afraid that he was going to stop breathing at …

Health

Neutering German shepherds too early can harm joints

German shepherds are often the preferred breed for police and military work, and are also popular as service dogs and family pets. But joint …

Pets

UC Irvine study taps high school brains

Christian LaBow left Servite High’s spring football practice early on a recent afternoon to undergo a brain scan. The 17-year-old varsity center …

The Brain

Scientists find biomarkers that could drive better cancer survival estimates

People with cancer are often told by their doctors approximately how long they have to live, and how well they will respond to treatments, but what if there were a way to improve the accuracy of doctors’ predictions?<p>A new method developed by UCLA scientists could eventually lead to a way to do just …

Cancer

A low-tech way to protect sugar cane workers

On the sugar cane plantations of Central America, young men are dying in alarming numbers from a kidney condition whose causes are not fully understood.<p>In some Nicaraguan towns, as many of 70 percent of men are afflicted with a form of chronic kidney disease (CKD) that is relatively uncommon …

Free to be He, She, They

Oliver Bishop has sandy blond hair styled like a 1940s screen idol’s and a scruffy beard and sideburns that frame his wide smile. A senior in high school, he is busy – singing with his school’s award-winning jazz choir, leading the marching band, teaching music lessons. Outgoing and popular, he was …

New Genetic Engineering Method Called Promising — And Perilous

A powerful new technique for changing genes in insects, animals and plants holds great promise, according to a report from an influential panel of scientists released Wednesday. But the group also says it's potentially very dangerous.<p>As such, the report from the National Academies of Sciences, …

Biomedical engineering

Scientists Are Using Tarantula Venom to Learn How Your Body Hurts

Scientists at UCSF are using tarantula venom to figure out how pain works. What they find could lead to new drugs that treat conditions like …

Science

Looking For a Better Way to Die

On June 9, California will become the fifth state in the nation to legally allow terminally ill individuals to end their own lives. Gov. Jerry Brown …

Researchers convert cirrhosis-causing cells to healthy liver cells in mice

Advances in stem cell research have made it possible to convert patients’ skin cells into heart cells, kidney cells, liver cells and more in the lab dish, giving researchers hope that one day such cells could replace organ transplantation for patients with organ failure. But successfully grafting …

You Need More Than Rat Tumors to Prove Phones Cause Cancer

Cell phones might cause cancer. Then again, maybe not. Figuring out which is the case begins with rats. Scientists trying to answer the question will …

Tarantula toxins offer key insights into neuroscience of pain

When your dentist injects lidocaine into your gums, the drug blocks the pain of the oncoming drill, but it also blocks all other sensation – leaving your mouth feeling numb and swollen. What if there were a drug that could specifically block pain, but leave the rest of your sensations alone? In …