UC Health

By University of California | At the University of California we are driven by our public service mission to take health care innovations to the next level. With health, there's hope.

Total recall: the people who never forget

An extremely rare condition may transform our understanding of memory<p>If you ask Jill Price to remember any day of her life, she can come up with an answer in a heartbeat. What was she doing on 29 August 1980? “It was a Friday, I went to Palm Springs with my friends, twins, Nina and Michelle, and …

The Brain

Health care’s new majority

Agenda 2020<p>The white population is shrinking, and minorities will soon be the majority. Is the healthcare system ready?<p>WEST SACRAMENTO, Calif. — On any given day at the Salud Clinic, Lucrecia Maas sees about 22 patients. They come to the community health center tucked away in an office park needing …

Health Care

Surgeon Donates Kidney To Anesthesiologist Colleague

<b>ORANGE (CBSLA.com) —</b> As a surgeon, Dr. Colleen Coleman is in the business of saving lives.<p>Often the people she helps are strangers, but she recently …

Health

This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs

A tiny self-propelled drug-delivery device might someday make taking antibiotics safer and more efficient. Think of it as a tiny submarine scooting around inside your stomach, fueled by the acid there.<p>Oral antibiotics are commonly prescribed life-saving drugs. Once an antibiotic is swallowed, it …

University of California

Thirdhand smoke affects weight, blood cell development

<b>The sticky residue left behind by tobacco smoke can do worse damage than stinking up furniture and discoloring walls. Exposure to thirdhand smoke leads to biological effects on weight and cell development that could be damaging to one’s health, according to new research led by scientists at the</b> …

Biology

Drug shows promise for treating alcoholism

<b>UCLA researchers have found that an anti-inflammatory drug primarily used in Japan to treat asthma could help people overcome alcoholism.</b><p>Their study is the first to evaluate the drug, ibudilast, as a treatment for alcoholism. Study participants were given either the drug (20 milligrams for two days …

Medicine

UC grant enables deeper, broader Valley fever research

<b>Researchers at UC Merced are playing key roles in the new UC Valley Fever Research Initiative, studying how the Valley fever fungus, Coccidioides immitis, causes disease in its mammalian hosts, and identifying the genes involved in this process.</b><p>School of Natural Sciences professors Clarissa Nobile, …

Biology

Binge drinking may quickly lead to liver damage, study finds

<b>Alcohol consumed during just seven weeks of intermittent binge drinking harms the liver in ways that more moderate daily drinking does not, according to researchers at UC San Francisco.</b><p>The scientists discovered that just 21 binge drinking sessions in mice were enough to cause symptoms of …

Alcohol

Autism researchers discover genetic ‘Rosetta Stone’

<b>Distinct sets of genetic defects in a single neuronal protein can lead either to infantile epilepsy or to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), depending on whether the respective mutations boost the protein’s function or sabotage it, according to a new study by UC San Francisco researchers.</b><p>Tracing how …

Genetics

Filling the health care gap

<b>Hundreds of health care workers from UCLA Health as well as students volunteered their time and expertise at the free, three-day Care Harbor health clinic in Los Angeles.</b><p>More than 300 physicians and nurses, dentists from the UCLA School of Dentistry, ophthalmologists from the UCLA Stein Eye …

Health Care

Biologists discover how viruses hijack cell’s machinery

<b>Biologists at UC San Diego have documented for the first time how very large viruses reprogram the cellular machinery of bacteria during infection to more closely resemble an animal or human cell — a process that allows these alien invaders to trick cells into producing hundreds of new viruses,</b> …

Biology

Vapers beware: 10 things to know about e-cigarettes

Teen vaping by the numbersApproximately 3 million U.S. middle and high school students use e-cigarettes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.<br>Roughly 16 percent of high school students used e-cigarettes in 2015, up from 1.5 percent in 2011; 5.3 percent of middle school …

Health

The force is with woman who gets life-saving lung transplant

A 24-year-old cystic fibrosis patient is starting the new year with new hope thanks to help from the U.S. Air Force, the actor who played Chewbacca in the “Star Wars” movies and a UCLA surgeon who said yes to a high-risk case.<p>Kathlyn Chassey of San Antonio, Texas, was born with cystic fibrosis, a …

UC Berkeley

Too much sitting, too little exercise may accelerate biological aging

<b>Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that elderly women who sit for more than 10 hours a day with low physical activity have cells that are biologically older by eight years compared to women who are less sedentary.</b><p>The study, publishing online January 18 in …

Longevity

CRISPR research institute expands into agriculture, microbiology

An initiative launched two years ago by UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco to use CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to develop new disease therapies is expanding into research on the planet’s major crops and poorly understood microbiomes, with plans to invest $125 million in these areas over the next five …

Genetics

Search engine: How artificial intelligence techniques are aiding the hunt for new drugs

<b>A better cure for cancer — and other illnesses — could already be in existence, hidden right under our noses.</b><p>The problem is that possible new lifesaving drugs are created much faster than scientists can study them. Millions of untested compounds wait, jumbled together in no particular order in vast …

Exercise does a body good: 20 minutes can act as anti-inflammatory

<b>It’s well known that regular physical activity has health benefits, including weight control, strengthening the heart, bones and muscles and reducing the risk of certain diseases. Recently, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine found how just one session of</b> …

Bait and switch? Study finds fish fraud runs rampant

<b>Next time you go out for sushi in Los Angeles, don’t bother ordering halibut. Chances are it’s not halibut at all.</b><p>A new study from researchers at UCLA and Loyola Marymount University checked the DNA of fish ordered at 26 Los Angeles sushi restaurants from 2012 through 2015, and found that 47 …

Scar-Free Healing Is Almost Here

Scientists have figured out how to make scars heal like regular skin.<p>Scars have been a persistent problem for people healing from injuries and surgery for all of human existence. But that might be about to change. New research from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of California, …

UC Davis Veterinarians Help Paralyzed Cat Walk Again

DAVIS (CBS13) — Against all odds, a cat suffering from a rare spinal cord infection is back on all fours.<p>Just three months ago, Gray was paralyzed …

Spinal Cords

UCLA Depression Grand Challenge takes major strides in first year

One year after the launch of the UCLA Depression Grand Challenge, demonstration projects and an innovative treatment center are off the ground. The initiative aims to help the 300 million people around the world who are suffering from depression.<p>UCLA scientists have already established national and …

How exercise influences health

<b>We know that exercise is good for you. But why, and how?</b><p>UC Irvine and UC Davis researchers will help investigate as part of a six-year, $170 million nationwide project to dig deep into the molecular changes that come from physical activity and how they influence health.<p>The National Institutes of …

Analyzing brain patterns may help neuroscientists reduce fear

<b>A new technique of analyzing brain patterns appears to help people overcome fear and build self-confidence.</b><p>The approach, developed by a UCLA-led team of neuroscientists, is described in two new papers, published in the journals Nature Communications and Nature Human Behaviour.<p>Their method could …

Experimental spinal implant shows promise for restoring voluntary movement

<b>A spinal stimulator being tested by doctors at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center is showing promise in restoring hand strength and movement to a California man who broke his neck in a dirt bike accident five years ago.</b><p>In June, Brian Gomez, now 28, became one of the first people in the world to …

The Top Health Stories of 2016

When it comes to big health news, 2016 had more than its fair share—some encouraging, some disappointing, and some a bit of both. From the Zika …

Why Scientists Are Still Flummoxed by Alzheimer's

Preventing memory loss and restoring it once it's gone is the holy grail of brain science. In the United States alone, an estimated 5 million people …

The Brain

TIME Person of the Year Runner Up: CRISPR Scientists

<i>BY ALICE PARK</i><p>Dr. Carl June’s lab at the University of Pennsylvania looks like any other biology research hub. There are tidy rows of black-topped …

Genetics

Alzheimer’s and concussion-related CTE may spread in the brain via common mechanism

<b>A shared biological mechanism may drive the progression of both Alzheimer’s disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a neurodegenerative condition associated with repeated concussions and brain trauma, according to a new study led by UC San Francisco scientists.</b><p>Both Alzheimer's and CTE are …

Did You Just Forget, or Is It Something More Serious?

Have you called your daughter by your wife’s name or your son by his brother’s name? Have you misplaced your car keys or forgotten where you parked at the mall?<p>If you worry these might be signs of significant memory loss or the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, which causes a slow deterioration …

Dementia