UC Health

By University of California | At the University of California we are driven by our public service mission to take health care innovations to the next level. With health, there's hope.

Chronic pain linked to increased dementia risk

<b>Researchers at UC San Francisco have found that older people with persistent pain show quicker declines in memory as they age and are more likely to have dementia years later, an indication that chronic pain could somehow be related to changes in the brain that contribute to dementia.</b><p>The study, …

Pain

Crispr May Cure All Genetic Disease—One Day

Author: Megan Molteni. Megan Molteni Business<p>Date of Publication: 06.07.17.<p>Time of Publication: 5:03 pm. 5:03 pm<p>Jennifer Doudna was sitting in her UC …

Genetics

UCLA doctors use magnetic stimulation to ‘rewire’ the brain for people with depression

<b>Americans spend billions of dollars each year on antidepressants, but the National Institutes of Health estimates that those medications work for only 60 percent to 70 percent of people who take them. In addition, the number of people with depression has increased 18 percent since 2005, according</b> …

Depression

3 minutes to mindfulness

<b>You’re late and there’s traffic. Your email inbox is flooded with urgent messages. You’re caught in the middle of a tiff between good friends. You have only a couple of weeks to move out of your place and find another. Your doctor says you need to “come in for some more tests.”</b><p>Stress and upheaval …

Mindfulness

A new baldness treatment?

<b>In experiments in mice, UC San Francisco researchers have discovered that regulatory T cells (Tregs; pronounced “tee-regs”), a type of immune cell generally associated with controlling inflammation, directly trigger stem cells in the skin to promote healthy hair growth. Without these immune cells</b> …

UC Berkeley

Century-old drug could provide new approach to autism

<b>In a small, randomized Phase I/II clinical trial (SAT1), researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine say a 100-year-old drug called suramin, originally developed to treat African sleeping sickness, was safely administered to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who</b> …

Medicine

Bicycling's huge costs in America

<b>Bicycle use has skyrocketed in popularity, but it’s also led to more accidents, with medical costs from non-fatal bike crashes climbing steadily by $789 million annually, according to a new study by UC San Francisco.</b><p>Over a 17-year period, medical costs of bicycle injuries to adults in the United …

Cycling

Born in the Summer of Love: The Haight Ashbury Free Clinic transformed drug addiction treatment

<b>As a straight-laced zoology student at UC Berkeley in the 1950s, David Smith never imagined himself as a drug expert giving free medical care to ailing hippies in the middle of the Summer of Love.</b><p>His role in founding the Haight Ashbury Free Clinic was a world away from Oklahoma, where his …

UC Berkeley

4 out of 5 physician moms report discrimination, much of it based on motherhood

<b>Workplace discrimination is common in medicine for women physicians who are also mothers, affecting as many as four out of five “doctor moms,” according to a new survey led by UC San Francisco.</b><p>Of the nearly 6,000 physician mothers in the survey, nearly 78 percent reported discrimination of any …

UC launches drug discovery consortium

About the consortiumThe UC Drug Discovery Consortium aims to support early drug discovery projects on UC campuses by sharing resources and expertise. The consortium launched with the help of a UC grant to the Drug, Device, Discovery and Development workgroup of UC Biomedical Research Acceleration, …

Surprising new role for lungs: Making blood

<b>Using video microscopy in the living mouse lung, UC San Francisco scientists have revealed that the lungs play a previously unrecognized role in blood production. As reported online March 22, 2017, in Nature, the researchers found that the lungs produced more than half of the platelets — blood</b> …

Tackling malaria worldwide

<b>Despite advances, malaria remains a leading global public health concern, with an estimated 212 million new cases and 429,000 deaths occurring in 2015.</b><p>In an effort to improve malaria control worldwide, University of California researchers have been awarded up to $25 million from the National …

Researcher tracking teens who attempted suicide

<b>More than 120,000 young people ages 10 to 18 attempt suicide each year, and about 4,500 of those attempts are fatal. Suicide is the third leading cause of death among children ages 10-14 and the second among people 15 to 34 years old. More people die from suicide each year than from breast cancer</b> …

When the Dalai Lama asks you to make an app...

<b>In her house on a hill in San Francisco with sweeping views of the city, Eve Ekman has a meditation altar, which highlights her spiritual interests.</b><p>In a nearby room, Ekman has the lamp by which her father, Paul Ekman, UC San Francisco professor emeritus in psychology, studied facial expressions — …

The hormone oxytocin is being tested for treatment of PTSD and alcohol abuse

<b>Nightmares. Obsessive thoughts. Avoiding particular places. Sudden outbursts. Fearing you’re in danger. Survivor guilt.</b><p>These experiences — manifestations of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) — are part of life for up to 1 in 3 U.S. combat veterans and active military personnel. That’s more than …

What does 'healthy' mean when it comes to food?

<b>Anyone who's ever walked into a grocery store has seen the various health claims on food items calling certain products "healthy." But what exactly does “healthy” mean — and can you rely on it?</b><p>The Food and Drug Administration is trying to find out. The federal agency recently began a public process …

Why humans are so bad at thinking about climate change

How psychology can trick us into keeping Earth habitable.<p>When Per Espen Stoknes looked at polls going back to 1989 assessing the level of public concern about climate change in 39 different countries, he found a surprising pattern in the data.<p>“Incredibly enough, it shows that the more certain the …

Climate

Safety in numbers: Project reduces radiation doses

<b>A new study led by UC San Francisco has found that radiation doses can be safely and effectively reduced – and more consistently administered – for common CT scans by assessing and comparing doses across hospitals, and then sharing best practices for how much radiation to use.</b><p>While there has been a …

Robots help stroke victims rehab

<b>Blame it on the movies and television, but people tend to think of robots as tireless factory workers or as soulless automatons bent on destruction. For UC Irvine’s Sumner Norman, they’re all about healing and rehabilitation. The fifth-year doctoral candidate in mechanical & aerospace engineering</b> …

Doctors Are Working on an Acne Vaccine

I wrote a story on acne for the April issue of <i>Allure</i>, and was shocked to find out that about 50 million Americans are diagnosed with acne every year. That’s more than the entire population of Australia or Canada. And you know what’s even more surprising? “The incidence of adult female acne is …

Skin Care

A Tiny Spot In Mouse Brains May Explain How Breathing Calms The Mind

Take a deep breath in through your nose, and slowly let it out through your mouth. Do you feel calmer?<p>Controlled breathing like this can combat anxiety, panic attacks and depression. It's one reason so many people experience tranquility after meditation or a pranayama yoga class. How exactly the …

The Brain

Better than Prozac?

<b>Standard antidepressant medications don’t work for everyone, and even when they do they are slow to kick in.</b><p>In an effort to find better depression treatments, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine discovered that inhibiting an enzyme called Glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) …

Can the study of epigenomics lead to personalized cancer treatment?

<b>Molecular insight into our own DNA is now possible, a field called personal genomics. Such approaches can let us know when we might have cancer-causing alterations in our genes. Well-known examples are the melanoma oncogene BRAF kinase, the breast cancer gene BRCA1 and the prostate specific antigen</b> …

Race ranks higher than pounds in diabetes, heart health risks

<b>Americans of South Asian descent are twice as likely as whites to have risks for heart disease, stroke and diabetes, when their weight is in the normal range, according to a study headed by Emory University and UC San Francisco.</b><p>Similarly, Americans of Hispanic descent were 80 percent more likely …

Daughter, father celebrate 50-year milestone of kidney transplant at UCLA

<b>Denice Lombard and her father, Ted, made history in 1967 by becoming one of the first father-daughter duos to survive kidney transplant surgery in the United States.</b><p>Today, 50 years later, they both are thriving and are marking the anniversary of Denice’s transplant surgery at UCLA to urge more …

A land without heart disease

<b>For most Americans over the age of 60, atherosclerosis is a common fact of life, viewed as an inevitable consequence of growing old.</b><p>Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque, composed of fat, cholesterol, calcium and other substances, builds up inside the arteries. Over time, the plaque hardens …

UC hospitals named leaders in LGBTQ health care equality

<b>Four University of California medical centers have been named leaders in equitable care for people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer.</b><p>UC Davis, UCLA, UC San Diego and UC San Francisco medical centers earned top marks as “Leaders in LGBTQ Healthcare Equity” from the Human Rights …

New multiple sclerosis drug that could halt disease meets FDA approval

Facts about MS<b>2.3 million:</b> People worldwide estimated to be living with MS<b>250,000–350,000:</b> Americans estimated to be living with MS<b>0.1:</b> Percentage chance of average American developing MS<b>20–50:</b> Age range at which most people are diagnosed<b>200:</b> Approximate new cases diagnosed each week<b>Sources:</b> …

Researchers find Zika's weak spot

<b>Zika virus (ZIKV), which causes Zika virus disease, is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus mosquito. An infected pregnant woman can pass ZIKV to her fetus during pregnancy or around the time of birth. Sex is yet another way for infected</b> …