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By University of California | At the University of California we are driven by our public service mission to take health care innovations to the next level. With health, there's hope.

Expert advice: How to help an addicted friend or family member get help

Experts understand that addiction isn’t a weakness or moral failing; it’s an illness, much like cancer or heart disease. And It often falls to family

Addiction

New insights into treating brain rhythm disorders

NEW YORK, When the human brain takes on intellectually challenging tasks, groups of neurons tune in to one another for a fraction of a second and …

The Brain

Touches of home help Venice clinic put young patients at ease

When Yana Barba stepped into the Venice Family Clinic's new children's health center this month, what she found was not a typical doctor's waiting room.

It smelled of cinnamon from the sweet potatoes a staff member was pulling out of an oven in the corner. A child squealed with glee as he played …

Kids

Diagnostic testing carries its own risks

If there’s a shooting pain down your leg, or a piercing ache in your ear, or your hip occasionally catches when you walk, do you pick up the phone to …

Medicine

The People Who Can Perfectly Remember Every Single Day of Their Lives

We all have moments when our memory fails us. It gets to Monday morning and we can't tell a coworker where we were Friday night, or we're at a pub trivia night and for whatever reason we struggle pathetically to remember the name of the lead singer from the Cure. However, for better or for worse, …

The Brain

Do Cell Phones and Laptops Cause Nearsightedness?

Robert DiMartino, OD, Professor of Clinical Optometry and Vision Science at the University of California, Berkeley, and a board member of …

University of California

Do Cell Phones and Laptops Cause Nearsightedness?

Robert DiMartino, OD, Professor of Clinical Optometry and Vision Science at the University of California, Berkeley, and a board member of …

University of California

How ‘Healthy Foods’ Are Killing You

Professor Laura A. Schmidt of UC San Francisco’s School of Medicine writes about the perils of sugar—explored in the documentary That Sugar Film, in theaters and on demand July 31.

Australian film director Damon Gameau performed an experiment on himself. For 60 days, he exclusively ate what most …

Healthy Eating

Autism's costs estimated to be $500 billion, potentially $1 trillion, by 2025

UC Davis health economists have for the first time projected the total costs of caring for all people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the U.S. for the current calendar year and in 10 years if effective interventions and preventive treatments for the condition are not identified and widely …

Autism

based device that reads medical diagnostic tests quickly and accurately

UCLA

The new ELISA platform is created with a 3D printer and attaches to a smartphone.

Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, or ELISA, is a diagnostic …

Medicine

Study may show a way to predict whether children with a genetic disorder will develop autism or psychosis

Maksim Koval/iStock

DiGeorge syndrome, known to geneticists as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, affects 1 in 2500 children.

Doctors and researchers have long …

Autism

Screening for Maternal and Postpartum Depression

The topic of postpartum depression gets a lot of attention in the media and among obstetricians. But is the ob-gyn office really the best place to …

Postpartum Depression

Hope amid dire brain tumor diagnosis

Neurosurgeons, researchers are slowly but steadily gaining understanding of these often lethal masses.

The Brain

UC medical centers among nation's best

The University of California's five medical centers are included among the nation's best hospitals in U.S. News & World Report's annual rankings, released today (July 21).

UCLA and UCSF medical centers again cracked U.S. News' top 10, ranked third and eighth, respectively. Both are on the Best …

Medicine

UC Health initiative cuts costs, improves quality

A University of California initiative to reduce costs and improve quality across UC’s five academic medical centers has saved more than $70 million in its first year.

UC Health’s Leveraging Scale for Value initiative, launched in 2014, built momentum in its first year and continues to ramp up its …

Medical Technology

Blood cell research turns personal

When he started working at a UC San Francisco lab that researches protein translational mechanisms in blood cancers a few years ago, Min Cho’s research was just an abstract — albeit important — concept to him.

Then last fall, Cho himself was diagnosed with a rare blood disease called severe aplastic …

UC Berkeley

Soda Is Just as Unhealthy as We Thought

Soda Is Just as Unhealthy as We ThoughtStudies confirming that soda really is as bad for us as we think continue to pile up—so, hey, here’s one more. …

Food

How Much Work Can the Back Do Without Strain?

About 80% of American adults complain of back pain and it is one of the most common reasons for calling in sick to work. Some $50 billion is spent on back-pain care in the U.S. each year. Still, it is difficult to know when we’re putting too much strain on the complicated mass of bones, nerves, …

Dow Jones

The world is watching Kai

NEWS NOW

The little dog is making medical history

The little dog Kai that has stolen many Ridgecrest residents’ hearts made it through the spina bifida …

UC Davis

Intellectual pursuits may buffer the brain against addiction

Challenging the idea that addiction is hardwired in the brain, a new UC Berkeley study of mice suggests that even a short time spent in a stimulating learning environment can rewire the brain’s reward system and buffer it against drug dependence.

Scientists tracked cocaine cravings in more than 70 …

Scientific Research

What we know colors what we see

From the smell of flowers to the taste of wine, our perception is strongly influenced by prior knowledge and expectations, a cognitive process known as top-down control.

In a University of California, San Diego School of Medicine study published July 13 in the online journal Nature Neuroscience, a …

The Brain

The sleep-deprived brain can mistake friends for foes

If you can’t tell a smile from a scowl, you’re probably not getting enough sleep.

A new UC Berkeley study shows that sleep deprivation dulls our ability to accurately read facial expressions. This deficit can have serious consequences, such as not noticing that a child is sick or in pain, or that a …

The Brain

Breath of life

Placentia’s Julie Hancock feels like she’s won the lottery − twice.

Hancock received the first lung transplant ever performed at UCLA Medical Center …

Medicine

GSK, UCSD team on blood cancers

Drug giant GSK allies with UC San Diego to fight blood cancers.

Cancer

The Science of ‘Inside Out’

FIVE years ago, the writer and director Pete Docter of Pixar reached out to us to talk over an idea for a film, one that would portray how emotions work inside a person’s head and at the same time shape a person’s outer life with other people. He wanted to do this all in the mind of an 11-year-old …

Movies

How To Grow Back The Back - Engineered Cartilage Surfaces

You’re going to shrink today. You did yesterday, and you will again tomorrow. By bedtime every night, you’re likely to be about an inch shorter than …

Cartilage

A new beginning for MLK hospital and the community

For several decades, King/Drew hospital in South Los Angeles served one of the neediest parts of Los Angeles, treating patients who didn't have insurance or anywhere else to turn for care.

Its opening in 1972 was viewed as a victory of the civil rights era and a source of pride for black Los …

Hospitals

Ground-Breaking Discovery: UC Davis Researchers Find Key Mechanism That Causes Neuropathic Pain

Embargo lifts at noon p.m. Pacific Time, July 6, 2015

DAVIS--In ground-breaking research estimated to affect millions of patients globally, scientists …

Turning the tables on cancer

More on immunotherapyRead Roan’s complete story in U Magazine and learn about other work being done on immunotherapies and other kinds of cancers.

In the spring of 2012, Tom Stutz was a man without a future. Just getting through the day took all of his energy and determination.

The retired attorney …

Cancer