UC Health

By University of California | At the University of California we are driven by our public service mission to take health care innovations to the next level. With health, there's hope.

Surprising new role for lungs: Making blood

<b>Using video microscopy in the living mouse lung, UC San Francisco scientists have revealed that the lungs play a previously unrecognized role in blood production. As reported online March 22, 2017, in Nature, the researchers found that the lungs produced more than half of the platelets — blood</b> …

Medicine

Researcher tracking teens who attempted suicide

<b>More than 120,000 young people ages 10 to 18 attempt suicide each year, and about 4,500 of those attempts are fatal. Suicide is the third leading cause of death among children ages 10-14 and the second among people 15 to 34 years old. More people die from suicide each year than from breast cancer</b> …

Suicide

When the Dalai Lama asks you to make an app...

<b>In her house on a hill in San Francisco with sweeping views of the city, Eve Ekman has a meditation altar, which highlights her spiritual interests.</b><p>In a nearby room, Ekman has the lamp by which her father, Paul Ekman, UC San Francisco professor emeritus in psychology, studied facial expressions — …

Buddhism

The hormone oxytocin is being tested for treatment of PTSD and alcohol abuse

<b>Nightmares. Obsessive thoughts. Avoiding particular places. Sudden outbursts. Fearing you’re in danger. Survivor guilt.</b><p>These experiences — manifestations of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) — are part of life for up to 1 in 3 U.S. combat veterans and active military personnel. That’s more than …

Substance Abuse

What does 'healthy' mean when it comes to food?

<b>Anyone who's ever walked into a grocery store has seen the various health claims on food items calling certain products "healthy." But what exactly does “healthy” mean — and can you rely on it?</b><p>The Food and Drug Administration is trying to find out. The federal agency recently began a public process …

Nutrition

Why humans are so bad at thinking about climate change

How psychology can trick us into keeping Earth habitable.<p>When Per Espen Stoknes looked at polls going back to 1989 assessing the level of public concern about climate change in 39 different countries, he found a surprising pattern in the data.<p>“Incredibly enough, it shows that the more certain the …

Climate Change

Safety in numbers: Project reduces radiation doses

<b>A new study led by UC San Francisco has found that radiation doses can be safely and effectively reduced – and more consistently administered – for common CT scans by assessing and comparing doses across hospitals, and then sharing best practices for how much radiation to use.</b><p>While there has been a …

Medicine

Robots help stroke victims rehab

<b>Blame it on the movies and television, but people tend to think of robots as tireless factory workers or as soulless automatons bent on destruction. For UC Irvine’s Sumner Norman, they’re all about healing and rehabilitation. The fifth-year doctoral candidate in mechanical & aerospace engineering</b> …

Robots

Doctors Are Working on an Acne Vaccine

I wrote a story on acne for the April issue of <i>Allure</i>, and was shocked to find out that about 50 million Americans are diagnosed with acne every year. That’s more than the entire population of Australia or Canada. And you know what’s even more surprising? “The incidence of adult female acne is …

Skin Care

A Tiny Spot In Mouse Brains May Explain How Breathing Calms The Mind

Take a deep breath in through your nose, and slowly let it out through your mouth. Do you feel calmer?<p>Controlled breathing like this can combat anxiety, panic attacks and depression. It's one reason so many people experience tranquility after meditation or a pranayama yoga class. How exactly the …

The Brain

Better than Prozac?

<b>Standard antidepressant medications don’t work for everyone, and even when they do they are slow to kick in.</b><p>In an effort to find better depression treatments, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine discovered that inhibiting an enzyme called Glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) …

Biology

Can the study of epigenomics lead to personalized cancer treatment?

<b>Molecular insight into our own DNA is now possible, a field called personal genomics. Such approaches can let us know when we might have cancer-causing alterations in our genes. Well-known examples are the melanoma oncogene BRAF kinase, the breast cancer gene BRCA1 and the prostate specific antigen</b> …

Cancer

Race ranks higher than pounds in diabetes, heart health risks

<b>Americans of South Asian descent are twice as likely as whites to have risks for heart disease, stroke and diabetes, when their weight is in the normal range, according to a study headed by Emory University and UC San Francisco.</b><p>Similarly, Americans of Hispanic descent were 80 percent more likely …

Diabetes

Daughter, father celebrate 50-year milestone of kidney transplant at UCLA

<b>Denice Lombard and her father, Ted, made history in 1967 by becoming one of the first father-daughter duos to survive kidney transplant surgery in the United States.</b><p>Today, 50 years later, they both are thriving and are marking the anniversary of Denice’s transplant surgery at UCLA to urge more …

Diabetes

A land without heart disease

<b>For most Americans over the age of 60, atherosclerosis is a common fact of life, viewed as an inevitable consequence of growing old.</b><p>Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque, composed of fat, cholesterol, calcium and other substances, builds up inside the arteries. Over time, the plaque hardens …

Inflammation

UC hospitals named leaders in LGBTQ health care equality

<b>Four University of California medical centers have been named leaders in equitable care for people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer.</b><p>UC Davis, UCLA, UC San Diego and UC San Francisco medical centers earned top marks as “Leaders in LGBTQ Healthcare Equity” from the Human Rights …

Health Care

New multiple sclerosis drug that could halt disease meets FDA approval

Facts about MS<b>2.3 million:</b> People worldwide estimated to be living with MS<b>250,000–350,000:</b> Americans estimated to be living with MS<b>0.1:</b> Percentage chance of average American developing MS<b>20–50:</b> Age range at which most people are diagnosed<b>200:</b> Approximate new cases diagnosed each week<b>Sources:</b> …

Researchers find Zika's weak spot

<b>Zika virus (ZIKV), which causes Zika virus disease, is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus mosquito. An infected pregnant woman can pass ZIKV to her fetus during pregnancy or around the time of birth. Sex is yet another way for infected</b> …

Biology

This Tiny Device Is a ‘Game Changer’ for People Facing Blindness

An estimated 170 million people worldwide suffer from age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a serious eye condition marked by the death of light-sensitive cells in the retina. Doctors can slow macular degeneration with vitamins, laser surgery, stem cell treatments, and even implantable miniature …

Medical Technology

Match Day's defining moment

About Match DayMatch Day is when graduating medical student applicants learn the location and specialty of the U.S. residency programs where they will train for the next three to seven years.Match Day caps a process that begins in fall for applicants. Using a computer algorithm, the nonprofit …

Can science rob snakes of their deadliest weapon?

IRVINE, Calif. — Even in a test tube, snake venom is terrifying.Mix a few beads of venom from a deadly Indian krait with blood cells and, within an …

Medicine

UC San Diego scientists find potential genetic basis for anorexia

<b>An international research team, led by scientists at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has created the first cellular model of anorexia nervosa (AN), reprogramming induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from adolescent females with the eating disorder.</b><p>Writing in the …

New nano-implant could one day help restore sight

<b>A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego and La Jolla-based startup Nanovision Biosciences Inc. have developed the nanotechnology and wireless electronics for a new type of retinal prosthesis that brings research a step closer to restoring the ability of neurons in the retina</b> …

Snake bit? UC Irvine chemists figure out how to easily and cheaply halt venom’s spread

<b>Chemists at the University of California, Irvine have developed a way to neutralize deadly snake venom more cheaply and effectively than with traditional anti-venom — an innovation that could spare millions of people the loss of life or limbs each year.</b><p>In the U.S., human snakebite deaths are rare — …

New blood test could help detect and locate cancer early on

<b>Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new blood test that could detect cancer — and locate where in the body the tumor is growing.</b><p>The study could provide a way to diagnose cancer early on without having to do invasive surgical procedures like biopsies. Researchers …

Head injuries can alter hundreds of genes and lead to serious brain diseases

<b>Head injuries can harm hundreds of genes in the brain in a way that increases people’s risk for a wide range of neurological and psychiatric disorders, UCLA life scientists report.</b><p>The researchers identified for the first time master genes that they believe control hundreds of other genes that are …

Boosting a baby's health during the 'golden window'

Quick summary• Young children grow and develop better with lipid-based nutrient supplements<br>• Study targeted children’s first 1,000 days of life<br>• 4,011 pregnant Bangladeshi women were enrolled in nutritional trial<p><b>Moms and dads caught in the frenzy of raising little ones probably don’t realize it, but the</b> …

Beauty boosters: Medications with cosmetic benefits

<b>Good genes only go so far in resisting aging. For those who want to up their arsenal of beauty boosters, there is a range of over-the counter and prescription medications available to fight skin redness, wrinkles and other beauty battles. Researching why the products were manufactured — and how</b> …

Oral delivery system could make vaccinations needle-free

<b>Patients could one day self-administer vaccines using a needleless, pill-sized technology that jet-releases a stream of vaccine inside the mouth, according to a proof-of-concept study conducted at UC Berkeley.</b><p>The study did not test vaccine delivery in people, but demonstrated that the technology, …