UC Health

By University of California | At the University of California we are driven by our public service mission to take health care innovations to the next level. With health, there's hope.

Can science rob snakes of their deadliest weapon?

Don't Miss<p>I<p>RVINE, Calif. — Even in a test tube, snake venom is terrifying.<p>Mix a few beads of venom from a deadly Indian krait with blood cells and, …

Medicine

UC San Diego scientists find potential genetic basis for anorexia

<b>An international research team, led by scientists at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has created the first cellular model of anorexia nervosa (AN), reprogramming induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from adolescent females with the eating disorder.</b><p>Writing in the …

Biology

New nano-implant could one day help restore sight

<b>A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego and La Jolla-based startup Nanovision Biosciences Inc. have developed the nanotechnology and wireless electronics for a new type of retinal prosthesis that brings research a step closer to restoring the ability of neurons in the retina</b> …

UC Berkeley

Snake bit? UC Irvine chemists figure out how to easily and cheaply halt venom’s spread

<b>Chemists at the University of California, Irvine have developed a way to neutralize deadly snake venom more cheaply and effectively than with traditional anti-venom — an innovation that could spare millions of people the loss of life or limbs each year.</b><p>In the U.S., human snakebite deaths are rare — …

UC Berkeley

New blood test could help detect and locate cancer early on

<b>Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new blood test that could detect cancer — and locate where in the body the tumor is growing.</b><p>The study could provide a way to diagnose cancer early on without having to do invasive surgical procedures like biopsies. Researchers …

Cancer

Head injuries can alter hundreds of genes and lead to serious brain diseases

<b>Head injuries can harm hundreds of genes in the brain in a way that increases people’s risk for a wide range of neurological and psychiatric disorders, UCLA life scientists report.</b><p>The researchers identified for the first time master genes that they believe control hundreds of other genes that are …

Genetics

Boosting a baby's health during the 'golden window'

Quick summary• Young children grow and develop better with lipid-based nutrient supplements<br>• Study targeted children’s first 1,000 days of life<br>• 4,011 pregnant Bangladeshi women were enrolled in nutritional trial<p><b>Moms and dads caught in the frenzy of raising little ones probably don’t realize it, but the</b> …

UC Berkeley

Beauty boosters: Medications with cosmetic benefits

<b>Good genes only go so far in resisting aging. For those who want to up their arsenal of beauty boosters, there is a range of over-the counter and prescription medications available to fight skin redness, wrinkles and other beauty battles. Researching why the products were manufactured — and how</b> …

Skin Care

Oral delivery system could make vaccinations needle-free

<b>Patients could one day self-administer vaccines using a needleless, pill-sized technology that jet-releases a stream of vaccine inside the mouth, according to a proof-of-concept study conducted at UC Berkeley.</b><p>The study did not test vaccine delivery in people, but demonstrated that the technology, …

UC Berkeley

Look twice, cut once

<b>Before Sonia Ramamoorthy, M.D., chief of colon and rectal surgery at UC San Diego Health, took a scalpel to Larry Smarr, Ph.D., director of Calit2 and Harry E. Gruber Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at UC San Diego, she first took a virtual tour of his large intestine. It encompassed</b> …

Medicine

Can you see better when you exercise?

<b>It’s universally accepted that the benefits of exercise go well beyond fitness, from reducing the risk of disease to improving sleep and enhancing mood. Physical activity gives cognitive function a boost as well as fortifying memory and safeguarding thinking skills.</b><p>But can it enhance your vision? …

The Brain

New evidence that e-cigarettes may harm your heart

<b>It’s been more than 50 years since the U.S. surgeon general warned the public about the lethal dangers of cigarette smoking.</b><p>Last year, Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy issued the first-ever report on electronic cigarettes, warning that their use posed a significant and avoidable risk to young …

Public Health

Total recall: the people who never forget

An extremely rare condition may transform our understanding of memory<p>If you ask Jill Price to remember any day of her life, she can come up with an answer in a heartbeat. What was she doing on 29 August 1980? “It was a Friday, I went to Palm Springs with my friends, twins, Nina and Michelle, and …

Neurology

Health care’s new majority

Agenda 2020<p>The white population is shrinking, and minorities will soon be the majority. Is the healthcare system ready?<p>WEST SACRAMENTO, Calif. — On any given day at the Salud Clinic, Lucrecia Maas sees about 22 patients. They come to the community health center tucked away in an office park needing …

Health Care

Surgeon Donates Kidney To Anesthesiologist Colleague

<b>ORANGE (CBSLA.com) —</b> As a surgeon, Dr. Colleen Coleman is in the business of saving lives.<p>Often the people she helps are strangers, but she recently …

Health

This Tiny Submarine Cruises Inside A Stomach To Deliver Drugs

A tiny self-propelled drug-delivery device might someday make taking antibiotics safer and more efficient. Think of it as a tiny submarine scooting around inside your stomach, fueled by the acid there.<p>Oral antibiotics are commonly prescribed life-saving drugs. Once an antibiotic is swallowed, it …

University of California

Thirdhand smoke affects weight, blood cell development

<b>The sticky residue left behind by tobacco smoke can do worse damage than stinking up furniture and discoloring walls. Exposure to thirdhand smoke leads to biological effects on weight and cell development that could be damaging to one’s health, according to new research led by scientists at the</b> …

Drug shows promise for treating alcoholism

<b>UCLA researchers have found that an anti-inflammatory drug primarily used in Japan to treat asthma could help people overcome alcoholism.</b><p>Their study is the first to evaluate the drug, ibudilast, as a treatment for alcoholism. Study participants were given either the drug (20 milligrams for two days …

UC grant enables deeper, broader Valley fever research

<b>Researchers at UC Merced are playing key roles in the new UC Valley Fever Research Initiative, studying how the Valley fever fungus, Coccidioides immitis, causes disease in its mammalian hosts, and identifying the genes involved in this process.</b><p>School of Natural Sciences professors Clarissa Nobile, …

Binge drinking may quickly lead to liver damage, study finds

<b>Alcohol consumed during just seven weeks of intermittent binge drinking harms the liver in ways that more moderate daily drinking does not, according to researchers at UC San Francisco.</b><p>The scientists discovered that just 21 binge drinking sessions in mice were enough to cause symptoms of …

Autism researchers discover genetic ‘Rosetta Stone’

<b>Distinct sets of genetic defects in a single neuronal protein can lead either to infantile epilepsy or to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), depending on whether the respective mutations boost the protein’s function or sabotage it, according to a new study by UC San Francisco researchers.</b><p>Tracing how …

Filling the health care gap

<b>Hundreds of health care workers from UCLA Health as well as students volunteered their time and expertise at the free, three-day Care Harbor health clinic in Los Angeles.</b><p>More than 300 physicians and nurses, dentists from the UCLA School of Dentistry, ophthalmologists from the UCLA Stein Eye …

Biologists discover how viruses hijack cell’s machinery

<b>Biologists at UC San Diego have documented for the first time how very large viruses reprogram the cellular machinery of bacteria during infection to more closely resemble an animal or human cell — a process that allows these alien invaders to trick cells into producing hundreds of new viruses,</b> …

Vapers beware: 10 things to know about e-cigarettes

Teen vaping by the numbersApproximately 3 million U.S. middle and high school students use e-cigarettes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.<br>Roughly 16 percent of high school students used e-cigarettes in 2015, up from 1.5 percent in 2011; 5.3 percent of middle school …

The force is with woman who gets life-saving lung transplant

A 24-year-old cystic fibrosis patient is starting the new year with new hope thanks to help from the U.S. Air Force, the actor who played Chewbacca in the “Star Wars” movies and a UCLA surgeon who said yes to a high-risk case.<p>Kathlyn Chassey of San Antonio, Texas, was born with cystic fibrosis, a …

Too much sitting, too little exercise may accelerate biological aging

<b>Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that elderly women who sit for more than 10 hours a day with low physical activity have cells that are biologically older by eight years compared to women who are less sedentary.</b><p>The study, publishing online January 18 in …

CRISPR research institute expands into agriculture, microbiology

An initiative launched two years ago by UC Berkeley and UC San Francisco to use CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to develop new disease therapies is expanding into research on the planet’s major crops and poorly understood microbiomes, with plans to invest $125 million in these areas over the next five …

Search engine: How artificial intelligence techniques are aiding the hunt for new drugs

<b>A better cure for cancer — and other illnesses — could already be in existence, hidden right under our noses.</b><p>The problem is that possible new lifesaving drugs are created much faster than scientists can study them. Millions of untested compounds wait, jumbled together in no particular order in vast …

Exercise does a body good: 20 minutes can act as anti-inflammatory

<b>It’s well known that regular physical activity has health benefits, including weight control, strengthening the heart, bones and muscles and reducing the risk of certain diseases. Recently, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine found how just one session of</b> …