The economy and the election: Curated by Margaret Brennan

Brennan is moderator of CBS News' "Face the Nation" and the network's senior foreign affairs correspondent based in Washington. She has reported on politics and international affairs, and spent a decade covering the global financial markets.

The economy and the election: Curated by Margaret Brennan

    Economy Hits Women Especially Hard

    Women, particularly “suburban moms,” are a key demographic courted by both presidential campaigns. Yet we don’t hear much about the long-term damage being done to women. Four times more women than men dropped out of the labor force in September, and women already accounted for most jobs lost in the early days of the pandemic. It took 10 years to regain the jobs lost in the last Great Recession, which leaves me wondering what will happen to American women as we fight our way through this crisis.

    An Unequal Recovery

    The stock market continues to roar upward which is good for the 55% of Americans who own stocks. However, for many Americans, there is a lot of inequality that is being exacerbated by the strain of the pandemic. It is falling heavily on the shoulders of those who can least afford it. The Washington Post provides a good dynamic snapshot of that inequity.

    What Would Joe Biden Do?

    If Joe Biden wins the election, he will have to chart a way forward for a country still struggling through a grinding economic recovery. This is a good quick read on the Democratic nominee’s positions, or lack thereof.

    What Would President Trump Do?

    The president is arguing for re-election based largely on his economic record, at least leading up to the pandemic. This is a good summary of how to judge the record.

    Can Either Candidate Bring the Jobs Back?

    Here’s a reality check to the campaign promises.

    China and America: What's Next

    The world’s two largest economies are headed on a collision course with both candidates delivering dueling promises to toughen the U.S. stance on China, particularly on the issue of trade. This is a thoughtful piece on how Beijing may be viewing the rivalry and its own rise. Bottom line: the U.S. needs a strategy.