Travis

32 Flips | 1 Magazine | @traddy05 | Keep up with Travis on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Travis”

Why Do Pipes Burst?

And why do they always do it so uniformly?<p>When the weather gets cold, local news outlets start warning listeners about pipes bursting. But what exactly happens when water splits metal? Seattle engineer Nick Berry (who recently tested the limits of QR codes) wrote up a handy blog post to explain.<p>The …

Climatologist: Nuclear Power Only Way To Curb Climate Disruption

Addressing the American Geophysical Union, James Hansen urges fellow scientists to study, share facts on nuclear energy<p>Polluters must pay for their carbon dioxide emissions, and nuclear energy must expand, says climatologist James Hansen, who retired this year from the NASA Goddard Institute for …

Fossil Fuels

Would a Psychopath Cheat a Psychopath Test?

I'm a fan of endeavours that bring science to the general public in a fun and accessible way, like the DIY Science Zone at this year's GeekGirlCon or anything Neil DeGrasse Tyson does, ever. That also includes citizen science, in which the general public can actually participate in experiments, …

Psychology

Popular Science on Twitter: "Cool! Cassini reveals lakes and seas of liquid methane around the north pole of Titan: http://t.co/fo0cG5gByH http://t.co/BGRSxbEUx5"

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How Brain Scans Can Lighten Sentences In Murder Cases

An increasing trend of defendants using neuroscience to argue for lesser sentences<p>A prison escapee convicted of killing a vacationing couple in their 60s—for their trailer, according to a newspaper from the couple’s hometown—recently dodged the death penalty for his crime. Instead, John McCluskey, …

University of London

Make Your Mornings Explosive With a Defusable Alarm Clock

Inspired by the iconic look of time bombs in old movies, software engineer Michael Krumpus set out to build an alarm clock that would make his mornings more action-packed. When the alarm goes off in defuse mode, the clock starts a 10-second countdown; the correct wire, which is randomly assigned …

Infants With Pets Look To Where The Action Happens

My baby is three months old, and he already seems to understand the world around him. The coffee machine (known as the coffee robot in our household) makes a grinding and pressing noise, which no longer startles him. The holiday tree, which has only been up for a week is a source of constant …

You Built What?!: A Tesla Coil Gun That Produces Foot-Long Sparks

Modeled after a Nerf gun--but with 200,000 volts under the hood<p>While browsing a bookstore near his home in Seattle last year, Rob Flickenger came across a graphic novel titled <i>The Five Fists of Science</i>. The story portrays inventor Nikola Tesla as a crime fighter who battles his enemies with a pair …

How Facebook's New Machine Brain Will Learn All About You From Your Photos

Facebook poaches an NYU machine learning star to start a new AI lab that may very well end up knowing more about your social life than you do.<p>Facebook users upload 350 million photos onto the social network every day, far beyond the ability of human beings to comprehensively look at, much less …

Meet The People Who Want To Print A Home In A Day

The open-source construction system WikiHouse could upend architecture as we know it.<p>On a cold, gray day in central London, Alastair Parvin is staring at a coffeepot, or what used to be one before he took it apart to clean it. The appliance lies strewn across an office table, a wreck of wet steel …

Popular Science on Twitter: "NASA's Chamber A is like space on Earth: http://t.co/pbXREwI5uK http://t.co/WWfeuoOTkH"

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Water May Be Flowing On Mars Right Now

Curiosity has uncovered ancient, once-wet lakebeds, but there might be some active streams, too.<p>The intrepid Mars rover Curiosity has already confirmed that water once flowed on Mars, but that it's long since dried up. Still, that doesn't mean there's not flowing water now, too.<p>NASA data has long …

Where's The Best Of What's New?

<b>We're still adapting our Best of What's New pages from prior to 2014--thanks for your patience!</b><p><b>Until then, take a look at our 2014 BOWN winners.</b>

Heating Water To 600 Degrees Celsius In One Trillionth Of A Second

A new trick of science could trigger some interesting chemical reactions.<p>It may only work on tiny amounts of water, but it should be the fastest transfer of energy to water on Earth. Scientists have figured out how to heat about one billionth of a liter of water 600 degrees Celsius in one …

Why Do Zebras Have Stripes? To Create Optical Illusions

They look awesome. But mostly, they mean less being eaten by flies and lions.<p>Why zebras have stripes has long been something of a mystery. We have a pretty good idea they're used as protection, but the exact mechanism isn't totally understood. I mean, why would evolution pick out <i>that</i>? The black on …

FYI: If I Fell Through Earth, What Would Happen In The Center?

Just getting to the center of the Earth and surviving is impossible. The Earth's core is about 9,000°F—as hot as the sun's surface—and would instantly roast anyone who found himself there. Then there's the pressure, which can reach roughly three million times that on the Earth's surface and would …

FYI: What Is The Evolutionary Purpose Of Tickling?

You probably know that you can't tickle yourself. And although you might be able to tickle a total stranger, your brain also strongly discourages you from doing something so socially awkward. These facts offer insight into tickling's evolutionary purpose, says Robert R. Provine, a neuroscientist at …

Of Squirrels and Men: How We Moved Squirrels Into Our Cities

<b>It’s hard to imagine</b>, but before the nineteenth century, there were no squirrels in Central Park or Harvard Square or Lafayette Park. Today, squirrels are all around us, not just in parks but everywhere. They go about their business as we go about ours, invisible to one another though we tread the …

USDA Issues Livestock Permit For Magical Reindeer To Enter U.S.

Bureaucratic holiday spirit<p>You guys. The U.S. Department of Agriculture would like you to know it has issued a permit for nine particular reindeer to enter the U.S. between the hours of 0600, December 24, 2013, and 0600 December 25, 2013. No time zone specified. Also, the press release says the …

A Guide To Spotting And Hiding From Drones

Like birdwatching, but for military robots.<p>Consider it a rough Audubon guide to the mechanical fauna of battlefields. Created by Amsterdam-based designer Ruben Pater, the Drone Survival Guide is, on one side, a rough bird watcher's guide to the modern robot at war. The other side is a short section …

FYI: Did Dinosaurs Get The Flu?

Investigating diseases of prehistory<p>It’s very hard to figure out when the influenza virus first started making animals sick. Studies of the history of major human epidemics suggest the flu has been around for at least a thousand years. “The certainty diminishes as we go further back into the past,” …

A Scientific Miracle: Theories of Mary's Virgin Birth

<i>Now the birth of Jesus Christ took place in this way. When his mother Mary had been betrothed to Joseph, before they came together she was found to be with child from the Holy Spirit. - Matthew 1:18</i><p>Merry Christmas, scientists! It's that time of year again when all rational human beings shake our …

Popular Science on Twitter: "Project! Build an autonomous lawn mower http://t.co/oL8dbw3vQW http://t.co/aSj4ifhWBN"

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Not Eggsactly

Popular Science Blogs<p>Boxplot<p>Exploring the world of science through graphic narrative. By Maki Naro<p><i>Hey everyone. I'm out of town for the holidays, but given the recent passing of the winter solstice, I thought this comic about a common urban myth was appropriate (given that it pops up at just about</i> …

The Year in Plagues: The End of Antibiotics, Fist Bump for Health, and More

In case you haven't had enough end-of-year lists, here are links to my personal favorite stories from 2013. Think I missed something big? Add it in the comments.<p>Also, I got the two-set <i>Encyclopedia of Pestilence, Pandemics, and Plagues</i> for Christmas from my thoughtful husband (see photo), which I …

5 Scientific Discoveries Based On Weird Baby Experiments

Babies can be mysterious creatures -- what exactly is going on in that little noggin? Fortunately, over the years, scientists have developed some creative ways to find out what makes babies tick. Here are some of the weirdest (but not cruel -- no abandonment here!) ways that research has probed …

How To Save The Electrical Grid

Extreme storms such as Hurricane Sandy have pushed the U.S. electrical grid to its breaking point. The technology exists to keep the lights on—we just need to implement it.<p>The explosion lit up the Manhattan skyline. A sudden boom, a one-two punch of yellow light—then everything went black. After …

How Neuroscience Will Fight Five Age-Old Afflictions

Rewiring the brain to battle seizures, blindness, and more<p>1) SEIZURES<p><b>A device delivers targeted drugs to calm overactive neurons</b><p>For years, large clinical trials have treated people with epilepsy using so-called deep-brain stimulation: surgically implanted electrodes that can detect a seizure and …

The Deep-Space Suit

Astronauts can only travel so far in existing space suits. What will it take to see the universe?<p>By the time the alarms go off, he's back on his feet, hoping the rover wasn't filming, but knowing that it was—that his face-first sprawl on the surface of Phobos has been recorded for posterity. The …

2014: The Year In Science

The 20 ideas, trends, and breakthroughs that will shape our world in 2014<p><b>Lasers Unleash A Flood Of Space Data</b><p>In January 2013, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter received a historic transmission: an image of the <i>Mona Lisa</i>. It was the first time scientists used a laser to send data to the moon, a feat …