rebecca

16 Flips | 1 Magazine | 1 Like | @tinyearthling | Keep up with rebecca on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “rebecca”

3D Printed Organs May Mean End To Waiting Lists, Deadly Shortages

Dying patients could someday receive a 3D-printed organ made from their own cells rather than wait on long lists for the short supply of organ transplants. Such a futuristic dream remains far from reality, but university labs and private companies have already taken the first careful steps by using …

Scientists create new memories by directly altering neurons in the brain - ExtremeTech

By on September 13, 2013 at 11:07 am<p>This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use.<p>Neurobiologists at UC Irvine …

thatssoscience: In 2013 women are passing men in the number of college graduates and make up at least 47% of the work force. Yet we still lag behind in STEM fields. Why? Gender bias is real. There are three main parts to this issue 1. The misconception that boys are naturally better at math. This has been proven time and time again to be false. This mindset discourages girls from pursuing STEM related degrees. Simply telling girls that there is no difference in abilities can impact test scores. As does encouraging women to see math prowess not as an inherent trait, but as a skill that can be practiced and mastered. 2. The culture in college STEM fields is a deterrent to women. The stereotype that STEM majors are obsessive reclusive men, is false. Active recruiting of women, planned social meetings, and women to women mentoring programs solve some of this issue. 3. STEM careers are heavily male-dominated and not family friendly. Lack of insurance for post docs and lack of time off for maternal leave deters new trainees. Because of the lack of women in these fields there are less connections that new women can gain. Improving family leave, creating new networks for women, and changing the image of scientists can all help to change this trend. YES. Yes yesyesyesyesyessssss. Required watching for anyone who gives a damn about the future of science. This captures so many levels of the STEM gender bias issue, from elementary school to faculty hiring. There’s lots of problems to solve, and it takes more than just telling young girls that they can do it. They need real, involved mentorship and practical role models. Julia captures the important first step here: “We have to actively challenge the stereotypes we’ve grown up with.”

In 2013 women are passing men in the number of college graduates and make up at least 47% of the work force. Yet we still lag behind in STEM fields. …

Feminism

Researcher controls colleague's motions in first human brain-to-brain interface

Researchers have performed what they believe is the first noninvasive human-to-human brain interface, with one researcher able to send a brain signal …

Protecting 17 percent of Earth's land could save two-thirds of plant species

Protecting key regions that comprise just 17 percent of Earth's land may help preserve more than two-thirds of its plant species, according to a …

Climate change will upset vital ocean chemical cycles, research shows

New research shows that rising ocean temperatures will upset natural cycles of carbon dioxide, nitrogen and phosphorus. Plankton plays an important …

Programmable glue made of DNA directs tiny gel bricks to self-assemble

A team of researchers has found a way to self-assemble complex structures out of bricks smaller than a grain of salt. The new method could help solve …

NASA's black-hole-hunter catches its first 10 supermassive black holes

NASA's black-hole-hunter spacecraft, the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, has "bagged" its first 10 supermassive black holes. The …

APOD: Roll Cloud Over Wisconsin (2013 Aug 08) Image Credit: Megan Hanrahan (Pierre cb), Wikipedia http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/fap/ap130908.html Explanation: What kind of cloud is this? A type of arcus cloud called a roll cloud. These rare long clouds may form near advancing cold fronts. In particular, a downdraft from an advancing storm front can cause moist warm air to rise, cool below its dew point, and so form a cloud. When this happens uniformly along an extended front, a roll cloud may form. Roll clouds may actually have air circulating along the long horizontal axis of the cloud. A roll cloud is not thought to be able to morph into a tornado. Unlike a similar shelf cloud, a roll cloud is completely detached from their parent cumulonimbus cloud. Pictured above, a roll cloud extends far into the distance as a storm approached in 2007 in Racine, Wisconsin, USA. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Roll-Cloud-Racine.jpg Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=130908 #APOD

The Real Neuroscience of Creativity

So yea, you know how the left brain is really <i>realistic, analytical, practical, organized, and logical</i>, and the right brain is so darn <i>creative, passionate, sensual, tasteful, colorful, vivid, and poetic</i>?<p>No.<p>Just no.<p>Stop it.<p>Please.<p>Thoughtful cognitive neuroscientists such as Anna Abraham, Mark Beeman, …

The Human Body: What It Is and How It Works, in Vibrant Vintage Illustrations circa 1959

Much of our inquiry into what makes us human focuses on understanding consciousness, yet we spend the whole of our lives in our physical bodies. As a lover of anatomical art and vintage science illustration, I was instantly enamored with <b>The Human Body: What It Is And How It Works</b> — a stunning …

Consciousness is a Process

Last week my fellow Phenom Ed Yong wrote a post about what happens to consciousness when animals die. According to the research Ed described, a rat’s brain shows signs of consciousness for at least 30 seconds after its heart stops.<p>That study got a lot of buzz, understandably, because of what it …

The Social Behavior Of Bacteria, Trippily Explored In Art

The advanced collective and social intelligence of bacteria colonies makes for some very psychedelic design.<p>The invisible colony of bacteria that spreads its invisible biomass across a petri dish is as gestalt as any alien hive-mind. Like such a mind, it grows with design, and it is from this …

Scientists Say They've Confirmed A New Element

Scientists in Sweden say they have confirmed a new, super-heavy element that was first proposed by Russian scientists in 2004. The element with the atomic number 115 has yet to be named.<p>In a press release, Lund University says a group of international scientists led by physicists from Lund …

Clear Cranial Implant Lets Doctors See Into The Brain

Some skulls really just need a window view.<p>Researchers from the University of California, Riverside have debuted a new transparent cranial implant that could let doctors peek inside the brain without having to drill a new hole in the skull every time--a technique that could allow for easier …