sujata de

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modiste

English[edit]<p>Etymology[edit]<p>From French <i>modiste</i>. Compare <i>modist</i>.<p>Pronunciation[edit]<p>(UK) IPA(key): /məʊˈdiːst/<p>Noun[edit]<p><b>modiste</b> (<i>plural</i> <b>modistes</b>)<p>A person …

dispel

English[edit]<p>Etymology[edit]<p>From Middle English <i>dispelen</i>, from Latin <i>dispellere</i> (“to disperse; to dispel”).<p>Pronunciation[edit]<p>Rhymes: -ɛl<br>• IPA(key): …

English Dictionary - Offline

The free offline English dictionary application explains the meaning of English words! Definitions are based on <b>English Wiktionary</b>. Fast search, easy …

nonchalant

English[edit]<p>Etymology[edit]<p>Borrowed from French <i>nonchalant</i>, from Old French <i>nonchaloir</i> (“to not be concerned”), from <i>non-</i> (“not”) + <i>chaloir</i> (“to have …

cynical

<b>1818</b>, Matthieu Joseph Bonaventure Orfila, A Treatise on Mineral, Vegetable, and Animal Poisons, Considered as to their Relations with Physiology, …

guffaw

t+sh:grohot t+sh:grohotati (Assisted)← Older revisionRevision as of 15:19, 21 May 2018Line 43:Line 43: * Portuguese: {{t+|pt|gargalhada|f}} * …

maverick

<i>See also:</i> <b>Maverick</b><p>English[edit]<p>Etymology[edit]<p>A portrait of Samuel Maverick, whose name is the source of the word <i>maverick</i><p>From the surname of Texas …

discreet

English[edit]<p>Etymology[edit]<p>From Old French <i>discret</i>, from Latin <i>discrētus</i>, from past participle of <i>discernēre</i>.<p>Pronunciation[edit]<p>IPA(key): …

derisive

<b>1894</b>, Samuel Rutherford Crockett, The Stickit Minister: And Some Common Men, page 173:<p>The three lambs stood at bay, huddled close together, and …

imperative

<i>See also:</i> <b>impérative</b><p>English[edit]<p>Alternative forms[edit]<p>imp., imper. (<i>abbreviation, grammar</i>)<p>Etymology[edit]<p>Borrowed from Latin …

cryptic

English[edit]<p>Alternative forms[edit]<p>cryptick (obsolete)<p>Etymology[edit]<p>From Late Latin <i>crypticus</i>, from Ancient Greek <i>κρυπτικός</i> (kruptikós), from <i>κρυπτός</i> …

preposterous

<b>1918</b>, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 16, in The Mirror and the Lamp:<p>The <b>preposterous</b> altruism too! […] Resist not evil. It is an insane immolation of self—as …

sleazy

English[edit]<p>Etymology[edit]<p>Possibly eventually from <i>Silesia</i>, through a word meaning “Silesian cloth”. Silesia used to be the most important location …

tentative

English[edit]<p>Etymology[edit]<p>French <i>tentatif</i>, from Latin <i>tentativus</i> (“trying, testing”), from <i>tento</i>, past participle <i>tentatus</i> (“to try, test”); see <i>tent</i>,</i> …

simpleton

English[edit]<p>Etymology[edit]<p><i>simple</i> +‎ <i>-ton</i> (as in a surname). Abbreviation of simple Tony or Anthony (Grose 1811 Dictionary). Compare French <i>simplet</i>, …

intrigue

<i>See also:</i> <b>intrigué</b><p>English[edit]<p>Alternative forms[edit]<p>Etymology[edit]<p>Borrowed from French <i>intrigue</i>, from Italian <i>intricare</i>, from Latin <i>intrīcō</i> (“I …

ominous

English[edit]<p>Etymology[edit]<p>From Latin <i>ominosus</i> (“full of foreboding”), from <i>omen</i> (“forbidden fruit, omen”), from <i>os</i> (“the mouth”) +</b> …

resilient

<i>See also:</i> <b>résilient</b><p>English[edit]<p>Pronunciation[edit]<p>Audio (US)<p>Adjective[edit]<p><b>resilient</b> (<i>comparative</i> <b>more resilient</b>, <i>superlative</i> <b>most resilient</b>)<p>Able to …

doodling

So the persistent researcher may still track down at least a few of Wilde’s own annotations and <b>doodlings</b> and wine stains and broken spines, parsing …

acoustic

English[edit]<p>Alternative forms[edit]<p>acoustick (obsolete)<p>Etymology[edit]<p>French <i>acoustique</i>, from Ancient Greek <i>ἀκουστικός</i> (akoustikós, “auditory”), from …

amicable

English[edit]<p>Etymology[edit]<p>From Late Latin <i>amīcābilis</i> (“friendly”); see <i>amiable</i>.<p>Pronunciation[edit]<p>IPA(key): /ˈæ.mɨ.kə.bəl/<p>Audio</b> …

immaculate

English[edit]<p>Etymology[edit]<p>From Middle English <i>immaculat</i>, from Latin <i>immaculātus</i>; prefix <i>im-</i> (“not”) + <i>maculātus</i>, perfect passive participle of <i>maculō</i> …

trousseau

<b>1906</b> September 29, The Literary Digest, volume XXXIII, number 13 (whole no., 858), New York, N.Y.: Funk & Wagnalls Company, publishers, 44 to 60 East …

flabbergast

<b>1772</b>, “Observator” [pseudonym], “On New Words; from the Same [<i>Town and Country Magazine</i>]”, in Edmund Burke, editor, The Annual Register, or A View of …