Stanford Medicine's Scope

By Stanford Medicine | Medical and health news from Stanford Medicine's blog and elsewhere

Deep brain stimulation might benefit those with severe alcoholism, preliminary studies show - Scope

Alcoholics struggling to stay sober are faced with countless triggers that can lead to relapse — driving past a bar, getting together with former …

The Brain

Reproductive choices facing women with disabilities require careful consideration - Scope

The reproductive needs of women with disabilities are complex and require thoughtful care, Stanford gynecologist Paula Hillard, MD, writes in an …

Disability

The importance of hearing your patients - Scope

In the spring of 1995, two patients with unusual symptoms taught me a critical lesson.<p>The first patient, a 50-year-old man, came into my office with …

Stanford University

Clues to Your Health Are Hidden at 6.6 Million Spots in Your DNA

Scientists have created a powerful new tool to calculate a person’s inherited risks for heart disease, breast cancer and three other serious conditions.<p>By surveying changes in DNA at 6.6 million places in the human genome, investigators at the Broad Institute and Harvard University were able to …

Genetics

A closer look at the powerhouses of the cell, mitochondria - Scope

Ask any student what they learned in their early biology curriculum and they’re almost guaranteed to say, as if by reflex, “the mitochondrion is the …

Imaging

Schizophrenia, bipolar disorder risk linked to hidden DNA sequences - Scope

I love it when seemingly disparate concepts converge, shedding light on a medical mystery. Today, for example, developmental biologist David …

Genetics

Frequent skin cancers might indicate increased risk for other cancers - Scope

There's no denying summer sun can be both glorious and deadly. Coming from a family of pathetically light-skinned people, I've been told all my life …

Cancer

Life on the border: Struggle, loss and desperation - Scope

Hayat, 46, in pink above, is from a village near Homs in Syria, although she now calls Akkar, Lebanon home. When she was in Syria, assailants came …

Middle East

Stanford scientists identify on/off sociability switch in brain

The release of a single signaling chemical from a specific nerve-cell tract in a particular part of the brain, like an on/off switch, may spell the …

Neuroscience

Reaching for new stroke treatments by understanding proprioception - Scope

Most of us take it for granted that we can sense where our bodies and limbs are, even in the dark. Yet scientists don’t know exactly how that sense, …

Neurology

As summer heats up, experts offer water safety tips for parents - Scope

Many families are beating the heat this summer with trips to pools, oceans and lakes. Sadly, the tragedy of accidental drowning can strike at a …

Stanford University

A nanoparticle opens new windows into neuroscience and biology - Scope

Any thought you’ve ever had, any motion you’ve ever made, any twinge of pain you’ve ever felt is the result, in part, of neurons in the brain and …

Neuroscience

Everyday Habits That Might Be Harming Your Health

More by Nicole<p>You try to eat healthy, prioritize sleep and hit the gym whenever you can. But when is the last time you rinsed your toothbrush? Are …

Wellness

Why to think carefully before pursuing a career in medicine - Scope

As a pre-medical student, I received advice from a mentor that I’ll never forget: “If you’re smart enough to get into medicine, you should probably …

Medicine

How Stanford Biodesign technologies have helped more than 1.5 million people - Scope

All summer, we've been sharing the stories of innovators like Uday Kumar, MD, and Avijit Bansal, MD, who — through their work with Stanford Byers …

Innovation

Learning human anatomy one stitch at a time - Scope

A hand-knit brachial plexus isn't something you see every day, so when I saw one while scrolling about the internet, I had to learn the backstory. …

Stanford University

A tale of two tables: A Stanford researcher’s experience at Oxford - Scope

After twenty years at Stanford, it was time for a sabbatical. I had earned a PhD in mechanical engineering and simultaneously joined the vascular …

Stanford University

New technology provides a better understanding of cells and their neighbors - Scope

New technology developed by Stanford Medicine researchers automatically identifies cell types and provides a comprehensive view of how cells interact …

Immunotherapy

Google Glass helps kids with autism understand faces, Stanford study finds - Scope

Last year, a few weeks after he began participating in a Stanford pilot study of a novel autism treatment, a boy named Alex did something that really …

Autism

Life on the border: Not simply help but empower - Scope

Odai, 46, is a Syrian refugee living in Mafraq, a city in Jordan about 8 kilometers away from the Syrian border. Before coming here, he owned four …

Middle East

Making it easier to help struggling newborns breathe - Scope

One day when I was training as a resident in India about a decade ago, I visited my mother, who is also a doctor, at her clinic. As I waited in her …

Stanford University

Clearing up misconceptions about phobias - Scope

Let's just say I know someone with a fear of dogs. An irrational fear, which means crossing the street to avoid a graying, elderly retriever on a …

Stanford University

Using 3D printing to design personalized cardiac devices - Scope

Of all the objects a 3D printer can churn out — musical instruments, camera lenses, shoes, hinges, doorstops, weapons — one of the coolest might be …

Stanford University

A look at how California lowered maternal mortality rates - Scope

Earlier this year, a friend of mine told me she was worried by what she’d been hearing in the news about rising maternal mortality rates. She was …

Pregnancy

Editorial shows importance of looking beyond medications to treat pain - Scope

The experience of pain isn't governed solely by incoming messages nerves send to the brain relaying that, say a finger has touched the hot stove. A …

The Brain

"Mood mirror" in blood: Might its absence bring on the blues? - Scope

Stanford psychiatric researcher Natalie Rasgon, MD, PhD, and her collaborators in a multicenter study have identified a substance, acetyl-L-choline, …

Stanford University

Eavesdropping on elephants in the name of research - Scope

Listening in on others’ conversations generally isn’t polite, but if you’re Caitlin O’Connell-Rodwell, PhD, eavesdropping isn’t rude — it’s research. …

Elephants

Osteoporosis risk predicted with genetic test - Scope

I've been lucky in my life to have broken only one bone when I was 6 years old. The accident happened on the school playground when a classmate …

Breast Cancer

Discussing care goals with a nonclinical worker brings higher patient satisfaction, lower costs, study finds - Scope

While working toward her master’s degree in public health, Manali Patel, MD, observed firsthand the benefits of including nonclinical workers in …

Health Care