Shree Mishra BR

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Histagrams, Major Historical Events Depicted as Instagram Posts

Histagrams — not to be confused with histograms — is a Tumblr blog that depicts historical events as Instagram posts. To see more of the funny posts, …

Incredible Panoramas Of The World's Most Beautiful Places

AirPano is made of eight team members, who have wide-ranging backgrounds (civil engineering and medical cybernetics, among others). The amateur photographers are currently traveling around the world, shooting major cities and other sites of interest.<p>The group mainly shoots from helicopters, using a …

Kuala Lumpur

Prskalo Waterfall, Serbia

Brain Cells 'Geotag' Memories To Cache What Happened — And Where

Think back to an important event in your life: a graduation, a birth, a special Thanksgiving dinner. Chances are you're remembering not only what happened, but also where it happened. And now scientists think they know why.<p>As we form so-called episodic memories, the brain appears to be using …

Fate Of Comet ISON Unclear Hours After Its Encounter With Sun

Watch Comet ISON's approach to the sun (NASA Video).<p><b>Updated 11:30 p.m. ET: 'My Best Guess ... There Is Something Left'</b><p>Scientists Thursday said that ISON, a comet formed at the birth of the solar system, apparently did not survive its encounter with the sun. Hours later, they weren't so sure.<p>At …

Vitamin D deficiency puts elite ballet dancers at risk of injury

Vitamin D deficiency caused by their intensive indoor training regime is putting elite ballet dancers at increased risk of injury, a study has found.<p>Researchers at the Royal National Orthopaedic hospital (RNOH), University of Wolverhampton and the Jerwood Centre at Birmingham Royal Ballet have …

Scientists make cheese from human toe jam

Eating the coagulated lactations of other animals is one of humanity's stranger habits, but rest assured that cheese derived from cow's, goat's, and sheep's milk has nothing on this. <i>Selfmade</i> is an exhibit that hosts a number of cheeses crafted from cells collected from human bodies. Part art, part …

Carnivorous giant platypus with sharp teeth once roamed Australia

A giant, carnivorous platypus with fearsome teeth once roamed the waterways of Australia, researchers have discovered.<br>The newly identified species, dubbed <i>Obdurodon tharalkooschild</i>, measured about a metre long, double the size of its modern-day equivalent.<br>Within the distinctive platypus beak, the …

Street Life in London in 1877 - in pictures

A rare book which was one of the first examples of social documentary photography has been put up for auction. Street Life in London, written by Adolphe Smith with photography by the Scottish photographer John Thomson, was published in 1877. The aim of the book was stated as being 'to bring before …

APOD: Fire on Earth (2013 Sep 01) Image Credit: (AFS, BLM) http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130901.html Explanation: Sometimes, regions of planet Earth light up with fire. Since fire is the rapid acquisition of oxygen, and since oxygen is a key indicator of life, fire on any planet would be an indicator of life on that planet. Most of the Earth's land has been scorched by fire at some time in the past. Although causing many a tragedy, for many places on Earth fire is considered part of a natural ecosystem cycle. Large forest fires on Earth are usually caused by lightning and can be visible from orbit. Above, in the year 2000, stunned elk avoid a fire sweeping through Montana's Bitterroot Valley by standing in a river. http://fire.ak.blm.gov/ http://www.blm.gov/ Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=130901 #APOD

APOD: Extrasolar Super-Earth Gliese 1214b Might Hold Water (2013 Sep 10) Illustration Credit & License: ESO, L. Calçada http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130910.html Explanation: Might this distant planet hold water? Actually, given how close Gliese 1214b is to its parent star, any water, if it exists, would surely be in the form of steam. In the above artist's illustration, the super-Earth Gliese 1214b is imagined passing in front of its parent star, creating a mini-eclipse that alerted humanity to its presence. Gliese 1214b, also designated GJ 1214b, has been designated a super-Earth because it is larger than the Earth but smaller a planet like Neptune. The entire Gliese 1214 planetary system is of the closest known systems to our Sun, located only 42 light years away. The parent star, Gliese 1214 is a slightly smaller and cooler version of our Sun. Recent observations from the Subaru telescope in Hawaii found very little scattering of blue light from the parent star by the planet. This appears most consistent with a planet that has a watery atmosphere -- although it is still possible that the super-Earth has clouds so thick that little of any color of light was scattered. Detecting water on exoplanets is important partly because most lifeforms on Earth need water to survive. http://www.eso.org/public/images/eso1047b/ Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=130910 #APOD

APOD: Rotating Moon from LRO (2013 Sep 16) Credit: LRO, Arizona State Univ, NASA http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130916.html http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNUNB6CMnE8 Explanation: No one, presently, sees the Moon rotate like this. That's because the Earth's moon is tidally locked to the Earth, showing us only one side. Given modern digital technology, however, combined with many detailed images returned by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), a high resolution virtual Moon rotation movie has now been composed. The above time-lapse video starts with the standard Earth view of the Moon. Quickly, though, Mare Orientale, a large crater with a dark center that is difficult to see from the Earth, rotates into view just below the equator. From an entire lunar month condensed into 24 seconds, the video clearly shows that the Earth side of the Moon contains an abundance of dark lunar maria, while the lunar far side is dominated by bright lunar highlands. Two new missions are scheduled to begin exploring the Moon within the year, the first of which is NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE). LADEE, which launched just over a week ago, is scheduled to begin orbiting the Moon in October and will explore the thin and unusual atmosphere of the Moon. In a few months, the Chinese Chang'e 3 is scheduled to launch, a mission that includes a soft lander that will dispatch a robotic rover. http://lro.gsfc.nasa.gov/ http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/ http://www.nasa.gov/lro Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=130916 #APOD

APOD: Moon, Venus and Planet Earth (2013 Sep 19) Composite Image Credit & Copyright: Fefo Bouvier http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130919.html Explanation: In this engaging scene from planet Earth, the Moon shines through cloudy skies following sunset on the evening of September 8. Despite the fading light, the camera's long exposure still recorded a colorful, detailed view of a shoreline and western horizon looking toward the island San Gabriel from Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay. Lights from Buenos Aires, Argentina are along the horizon on the left, across the broad Rio de la Plata estuary. The long exposure strongly overexposed the Moon and sky around it, though. So the photographer quickly snapped a shorter one to merge with the first image in the area around the bright lunar disk. As the the second image was made with a telephoto setting, the digital merger captures both Earth and sky, exaggerating the young Moon's slender crescent shape in relation to the two nearby bright stars. The more distant is bluish Spica, alpha star of the constellation Virgo. Closest to the Moon is Earth's evening star, planet Venus, emerging from a lunar occultation. http://www.fefobouvier.com/ Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=130919 #APOD

APOD: Antares Rocket Launch (2013 Sep 21) Image Credit: NASA, Bill Ingalls http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130921.html Explanation: The sky looks dark in this scene from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) at NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Virginia. Captured on Wednesday, September 18, an Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket is leaving launch pad-0A with the Cygnus cargo spacecraft aboard. Though it looks like night, the photograph was taken at 10:58am EDT, under bright, clear morning skies, with a digital camera modified to record infrared images. The Sun itself is above and left of the picture frame, creating strong glare and internal reflections in the camera lens at near-infrared wavelengths. In the false-color presentation, the vegetation and watery reflections also take on an otherworldly pallor. Reaching orbit, the Cygnus spacecraft is now on its way to a Sunday rendezvous with the International Space Station. The spacecraft will deliver about 1,300 pounds (589 kilograms) of cargo to the Expedition 37 crew. Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=130921 #APOD

APOD: Apollo's Analemma (2013 Sep 22) Image Credit & Copyright: Anthony Ayiomamitis (TWAN) http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130922.html Explanation: Today, the Sun crosses the celestial equator heading south at 20:44 Universal Time. An equinox (equal night), this astronomical event marks the first day of autumn in the northern hemisphere and spring in the south. With the Sun on the celestial equator, Earth dwellers will experience nearly 12 hours of daylight and 12 hours of darkness. To celebrate, consider this remarkable record of the Sun's yearly journey through planet Earth's sky, made with planned multiple exposures captured on a single piece of 35 millimeter film. Exposures were made at the same time of day (9:00am local time), capturing the Sun's position on dates from January 7 through December 20, 2003. The multiple suns trace an intersecting curve known as an analemma. A foreground base exposure of the Temple of Apollo in ancient Corinth, Greece, appropriate for an analemma, was digitally merged with the film image. Equinox dates correspond to the middle points (not the intersection point) of the analemma. The curve is oriented at the corresponding direction and altitude for the temple, so the Sun's position for the September equinox is at the upper midpoint near picture center. Summer and winter solstices are at analemma top and bottom. http://www.perseus.gr/ http://twanight.org/Ayiomamitis Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=130922 #APOD

APOD: M81 versus M82 (2013 Sep 25) Image Credit & Copyright: Ivan Eder http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130925.html Explanation: Here in the Milky Way galaxy we have astronomical front row seats as M81 and M82 face-off, a mere 12 million light-years away. Locked in a gravitational struggle for the past billion years or so, the two bright galaxies are captured in this deep telescopic snapshot, constructed from 25 hours of image data. Their most recent close encounter likely resulted in the enhanced spiral arms of M81 (left) and violent star forming regions in M82 so energetic the galaxy glows in X-rays. After repeated passes, in a few billion years only one galaxy will remain. From our perspective, this cosmic moment is seen through a foreground veil of the Milky Way's stars and clouds of dust. Faintly reflecting the foreground starlight, the pervasive dust clouds are relatively unexplored galactic cirrus, or integrated flux nebulae, only a few hundred light-years above the plane of the Milky Way. http://www.astroeder.com/en.htm Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=130925 #APOD

APOD: Andromeda on the Rocks (2013 Sep 27) Image Credit & Copyright: Cristian Fattinnanzi http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130927.html Explanation: How far can you see? The Andromeda Galaxy 2.5 million light years away is the most distant object easily seen by the unaided eye. Other apparent denizens of the night sky, stars, clusters, and nebulae, typically range from a few hundred to a few thousand light-years away and lie well within our own Milky Way Galaxy. Also known as M31, the Andromeda Galaxy is the faint smudge near top center of this Earth and skyscape, taken from eastern Italy, near Monte Conero on the Adriatic sea coast. From a few centimeters to a few million light-years, the picture demonstrates a stunning range of vision. Though galaxy and seaside rocks could be seen with the eye on that clear summer night, no camera captured this view in a single exposure. Because the stars trailed above the horizon while the picture was made, separate exposures tracking the stars were combined with one of rocks and cliffs made with the camera steadied to create the tantalizing scene. http://www.cristianfattinnanzi.it/ Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=130927 #APOD

APOD: Equinox Earth (2013 Sep 28) Image Credit: Roscosmos / NTSOMZ / zelenyikot.livejournal.com Courtesy: Igor Tirsky, Vitaliy Egorov http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130928.html Explanation: From a geostationary orbit 36,000 kilometers above the equator, Russian meteorological satellite Elektro-L takes high-resolution images our fair planet every 30 minutes. But only twice a year, during an Equinox, can it capture an image like this one, showing an entire hemisphere bathed in sunlight. At an Equinox, the Earth's axis of rotation is not tilted toward or away from the Sun, so the solar illumination can extend to both the planet's poles. Of course, this Elektro-L picture was recorded on September 22nd, at the northern hemisphere's autumnal equinox. For a moment on that date, the Sun was behind the geostationary satellite and a telltale glint of reflected sunlight is seen crossing the equator, at the location on the planet with satellite and sun directly overhead (5MB animated gif). http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1309/130921-600ElektroL.gif http://vk.com/electrol http://roscosmos.ru/ Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=130928 #APOD

APOD: ISON, Mars, Regulus (2013 Oct 17) Image Credit & Copyright: Pete Lawrence (Digital-Astronomy) http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap131017.html Explanation: In order top to bottom this celestial snapshot features Comet ISON, planet Mars, and Regulus, alpha star of the constellation Leo, in the same frame. The scene spans about 2 degrees near the eastern horizon in early morning skies of October 15. Closest of the three, the much heralded Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) is by far the faintest at 14 light-minutes (1.7 AU) away. Mars is only slightly farther from our fair planet. About 16.5 light minutes (2 AU) away its normal ruddy color is washed out in the exposure. Regulus outshines both comet and planet from a distance of 75 light-years. Just above Regulus, the very faint smudge of light is actually the Leo I dwarf galaxy, 800,000 light-years away and almost lost in the glare of the bluish hued bright star. Comet ISON is expected to grow brighter, though. How bright is still not clear, but not as bright as a Full Moon in night skies. Estimated to be 1 to 4 kilometers in diameter, ISON's nucleus might substantially survive its very close encounter with the Sun on November 28. If so, the comet will climb back above the eastern horizon in planet Earth's northern hemisphere before dawn in early December. http://www.digitalsky.org.uk/ Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=131017 #APOD

APOD: Saturn from Above (2013 Oct 21) Image Credit & License: NASA/JPL/SSI; Composition: Gordan Ugarkovic http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap131021.html Explanation: This image of Saturn could not have been taken from Earth. No Earth based picture could possibly view the night side of Saturn and the corresponding shadow cast across Saturn's rings. Since Earth is much closer to the Sun than Saturn, only the day side of the ringed planet is visible from the Earth. In fact, this image mosaic was taken earlier this month by the robotic Cassini spacecraft now orbiting Saturn. The beautiful rings of Saturn are seen in full expanse, while cloud details are visible including the polar hexagon surrounding the north pole, and an extended light-colored storm system. http://www.flickr.com/photos/ugordan Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=131021 #APOD

NGC 7789: Caroline's Rose Image Credit & Copyright: Albert Barr http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap131026.html Explanation: Found among the rich starfields of the Milky Way toward the constellation Cassiopeia, star cluster NGC 7789 lies about 8,000 light-years away. A late 18th century deep sky discovery of astronomer Caroline Lucretia Herschel, the cluster is also known as Caroline's Rose. Its suggestive appearance is created by the cluster's nestled complex of stars and voids. Now estimated to be 1.6 billion years young, the galactic or open cluster of stars also shows its age. All the stars in the cluster were likely born at the same time, but the brighter and more massive ones have more rapidly exhausted the hydrogen fuel in their cores. These have evolved from main sequence stars like the Sun into the many red giant stars shown with a yellowish cast in this lovely color composite. Using measured color and brightness, astronomers can model the mass and hence the age of the cluster stars just starting to "turn off" the main sequence and become red giants. Over 50 light-years across, Caroline's Rose spans about half a degree (the angular size of the moon) near the center of the wide-field telescopic image. http://www.shutterstock.com/g/ajbarr Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=32353 #APOD

APOD: Sungrazer (2013 Oct 27) Image Credit: LASCO, SOHO Consortium, NRL, ESA, NASA http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap131027.html Explanation: Arcing toward a fiery fate, this Sungrazer comet was recorded by the SOHO spacecraft's Large Angle Spectrometric COronagraph(LASCO) on December 23, 1996. LASCO uses an occulting disk, partially visible at the lower right, to block out the otherwise overwhelming solar disk allowing it to image the inner 8 million kilometers of the relatively faint corona. The comet is seen as its coma enters the bright equatorial solar wind region (oriented vertically). Positioned in space to continuously observe the Sun, SOHO has now been used to discover over 1,500 comets, including numerous sungrazers. Based on their orbits, the vast majority of sungrazers are believed to belong to the Kreutz family of sungrazing comets created by successive break ups from a single large parent comet that passed very near the Sun in the twelfth century. The Great Comet of 1965, Ikeya-Seki, was also a member of the Kreutz family, coming within about 650,000 kilometers of the Sun's surface. Passing so close to the Sun, Sungrazers are subjected to destructive tidal forces along with intense solar heat. This small comet, known as the Christmas Comet SOHO 6, did not survive. Later this year, Comet ISON, potentially the brightest sungrazer in recorded history but not a Kreutz sungrazer, is expected to survive. Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=131027 #APOD

APOD: Jupiter's Triple Shadow Transit (2013 Nov 02) Image Credit & Copyright: Leo Aerts http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap131102.html Explanation: This webcam and telescope image of banded gas giant Jupiter shows the transit of three shadows cast by Jupiter's moons in progress, captured in Belgian skies on October 12 at 0528 UT. Such a three shadow transit is a relatively rare event, even for a large planet with many moons. Visible in the frame are the three Galilean moons responsible, Callisto at the far left edge, Io closest to Jupiter's disk, and Europa below and just left of Io. Of their shadows on the sunlit Jovian cloud tops, Callisto casts the most elongated one near the planet's south polar region at the bottom. Io's shadow is above and right of Jupiter's Great Red Spot. Of course viewed from Jupiter's perspective, these shadow crossings could be seen as solar eclipses, analogous to the Moon's shadow crossing the sunlit face of planet Earth. Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=131102 #APOD

APOD: A Rare Hybrid Solar Eclipse (2013 Nov 03) Image Credit & Copyright: Left: Fred Espenak - Right: Stephan Heinsius http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap131103.html Explanation: A spectacular geocentric celestial event of 2005 was a rare hybrid eclipse of the Sun - a total or an annular eclipse could be seen depending on the observer's location. For Fred Espenak, aboard a gently swaying ship within the middle of the Moon's shadow track about 2,200 kilometers west of the Galapagos, the eclipse was total, the lunar silhouette exactly covering the bright solar disk for a few brief moments. His camera captured a picture of totality revealing the extensive solar corona and prominences rising above the Sun's edge. But for Stephan Heinsius, near the end of the shadow track at Penonome Airfield, Panama, the Moon's apparent size had shrunk enough to create an annular eclipse, showing a complete annulus of the Sun's bright disk as a dramatic ring of fire. Pictures from the two locations are compared above. How rare is such a hybrid eclipse? Calculations show that during the 21st century just 3.1% (7 out of 224) of solar eclipses are hybrid while hybrids comprise about 5% of all solar eclipses over the period 2000 BC to AD 3000. Today's hybrid solar eclipse is most widely visible beyond the central shadow track as a brief partial eclipse from northeastern Americas through Africa, and along the track in an annular phase for only the first 15 seconds. http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/fap/image/0505/espenak_tse2005_1.jpg http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/fap/image/0505/Heinsius_Panama_tse2005_1.jpg Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=131103

APOD: Eclipse Over New York (2013 Nov 04) Image Credit & Copyright: Chris Cook http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap131104.html Explanation: A sunrise over New York City rarely looks like this. Yesterday, however, the Sun rose partly eclipsed by the Moon as seen from much of the eastern North American and northern South America. Simultaneously, much of Africa, already well into daytime, saw the eclipse from beginning to end. The eclipse was unusual in that it was a hybrid -- parts of the Earth saw the Moon as too angularly small to cover the whole Sun, and so at maximum coverage left the Sun surrounded by a ring a fire, while other parts of the Earth saw the Moon as large enough to cover the entire Sun, and so at maximum coverage witnessed a total solar eclipse. Slight changes in the angular size of the Moon as seen from the Earth's surface are caused by the non-flatness of the Earth and the ellipticity of the Moon's orbit. Pictured above, the famous Empire State Building in New York City is seen to the left of the partially eclipsed Sun, adorned with scenic clouds. The next solar eclipse visible from New York City -- a very slight eclipse -- will occur during the sunset of 2014 October 23. http://www.cookphoto.com/ Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=131104 Starship Asterisk* Gallery • Solar Eclipse, November 2013 http://asterisk.apod.com/viewtopic.php?t=32391 #APOD

The hybrid solar eclipse – in pictures

A rare hybrid solar eclipse has taken place, switching between a total eclipse (where the moon completely covers the sun) and an annular one (where a halo of sunlight is visible around the moon)