Seth

30 Flips | 1 Magazine | 10 Following | @sethgainer | West Virginian, Washingtonian, music lover, stranger to blue water.

As U.S. Life Expectancies Climb, People In A Few Places Are Dying Younger

Your life expectancy can vary by as much as 20 years depending on which county in the U.S. you live in.<p>That’s according to new research published …

Demographics

Illness as indicator

Local health outcomes predict Trumpward swings<p>THE first piece of news Americans woke up to on November 9th was that Donald Trump had been elected …

Public Health

The French, Coming Apart

The real-estate market in any sophisticated city reflects deep aspirations and fears. If you had a feel for its ups and downs—if you understood, say, …

Obama the Hamiltonian

When former President Barack Obama decided to take $400,000 from a Wall Street investment bank for the first paid speech of his post-presidential …

Political Science

To Understand ‘Brexit,’ Look to Britain’s Tabloids

LONDON — Tony Gallagher, editor of The Sun, one of Britain’s most raucous and influential tabloids, looks down on the government, literally. From the height of his 12th-floor newsroom, all glass and views, the Palace of Westminster seems like a toy castle, something to be played with or ignored at …

Loved to Death: How Instagram Is Destroying Our Natural Wonders

The Little North Fork and Three Pools area is some 40 miles from the house in Keizer, Oregon, where I grew up. In high school, my friends and I would …

The United States of Billy Joel

The Piano Man hasn’t released a new pop album since 1993. How does he continue to sell out stadiums?<p>For those of you who are sick of wondering, this is what happens at a Billy Joel concert: A mother tries to cajole her reluctant young son to twist with her to “Only the Good Die Young.” A …

Music

The Mountaineers as a metaphor: How WVU’s heartbreaking loss reminds us of what else we’re missing

×<p>Republish This Story for Free<p>The Mountaineers as a metaphor: How WVU's heartbreaking loss reminds us of what else we're missing<p>Thank you for your …

Coal industry's go-to law firm withheld evidence of black lung, at expense of sick miners

BECKLEY, W.Va. — The stately, wood-paneled chamber in the federal building here unsettled Gary Fox and his wife, Mary. Fox was used to the dusty …

The Domestic Conspiracy That Gave Trump The Election Is In Plain Sight

Information presently public and available confirms that Erik Prince, Rudy Giuliani, and Donald Trump conspired to intimidate FBI Director James Comey into interfering in, and thus directly affecting, the 2016 presidential election. This conspiracy was made possible with the assistance of officers …

Meet the man who may end gerrymandering: A retired Wisconsin law professor’s Supreme Court case could save democracy

<b>(Shutterstock/Wikimedia/Salon)</b><p>Bill Whitford and his friends met in a Madison tea room to talk politics. Now his case could shape history<p>David Daley<p>March 26, 2017 1:00pm (UTC)<p>Gerrymandering, the process of drawing distorted legislative districts to undermine democracy, is as old as our republic …

Government

It wasn't just Greece: Archaeologists find early democratic societies in the Americas

The candidate for political office stood in a plaza, naked, bracing himself against the punches and kicks. The crowd roared, pulsing around him like …

Drug firms poured 780M painkillers into WV amid rise of overdoses

Follow the pills and you'll find the overdose deaths.<p>The trail of painkillers leads to West Virginia's southern coalfields, to places like Kermit, …

Patterson Hood

Stalking the South's Wild Edibles

One Year in Helvetia

Why the Confederacy Lives

One hundred-fifty years after Appomattox, many Southerners still won’t give up.<p>One hundred fifty years ago, on April 9th, 1865, Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox Court House and the Union triumphed in the Civil War. Yet the passage of a century and a half has not dimmed the passion for …

Take Down the Confederate Flags, but Not the Monuments

Instead of of sanitizing the past, communities need to strike a balance between confronting history and respecting the needs of the present.<p>On Sunday, in Charleston, South Carolina’s White Point Garden, vandals struck the Fort Sumter Memorial, a neoclassical paean to the Confederate defenders of …

The Stubborn Persistence of Confederate Monuments

A new report identifies some 1,500 memorials to the Civil War’s losing cause, from schools to state holidays, ranging from the Deep South to the Pacific Northwest.<p>For most Americans, today is the second day of work this week. But state employees in Alabama, Mississippi, and Georgia are just kicking …

Data Firm Says ‘Secret Sauce’ Aided Trump; Many Scoff

Standing before political and business leaders in New York last fall, Alexander Nix promised a revolution.<p>Many companies compete in the market for political microtargeting, using huge data sets and sophisticated software to identify and persuade voters. But Mr. Nix’s little-known firm, Cambridge …

Cambridge Analytica

Want to rescue rural America? Bust monopolies.

Since President Trump’s election, much has been made of his rural, heartland voters, and how politicians can better serve them, with most discussion centering on international trade and globalization. But there is another political and economic disaster crushing the heartland — one politicians …

Bigger Corporations Are Making You Poorer

A wave of new research shows how as corporations get bigger, the share of money out there going to actual workers declines.<p>Increasingly, the problem of corporate concentration, and in its more extreme form, monopoly, is returning to the American political debate. In 2016, senators from both parties …

Literature’s Arctic Obsession

The greatest writers of the nineteenth century were drawn to the North Pole. What did they hope to find there?<p>In February of 1880, the whaling ship Hope sailed north from Peterhead, Scotland, and headed for the Arctic. Her crew included a highly regarded captain, an illiterate but gifted first …

The Roots of the New Urban Crisis

In an excerpt from his new book, Richard Florida warns of “the central crisis of our times”—the growing cleavage between superstar cities and those left behind.<p>Updated: April 10, 2017 Editor's Note: Listen to Richard Florida discuss <i>The New Urban Crisis</i> on NPR’s <i>Morning Edition.</i><p>Cities, it seems, are …

America’s Most Political Food

The founder of a popular South Carolina barbecue restaurant was a white supremacist. Now that his children have taken over, is it O.K. to eat there?<p>In February of 2015, Kathleen Purvis, the food editor of the Charlotte <i>Observer</i>, drove to Birmingham, Alabama, to attend Food Media South, an annual …

Choosing a School for My Daughter in a Segregated City

In the spring of 2014, when our daughter, Najya, was turning 4, my husband and I found ourselves facing our toughest decision since becoming parents. We live in Bedford-Stuyvesant, a low-income, heavily black, rapidly gentrifying neighborhood of brownstones in central Brooklyn. The nearby public …

The Privilege of School Choice

When given the chance, will wealthy parents ever choose to desegregate schools?<p><i>Last year, a contentious zone change in New York City forced well-off parents to decide whether or not to integrate a high-poverty school. The exact-same scenario had played out a half-century earlier during the city’s</i> …

The Case for Reparations

Two hundred fifty years of slavery. Ninety years of Jim Crow. Sixty years of separate but equal. Thirty-five years of racist housing policy. Until we reckon with our compounding moral debts, America will never be whole.<p><i>And if thy brother, a Hebrew man, or a Hebrew woman, be sold unto thee, and</i> …

Drawing the Line

How redistricting turned America from blue to red.<p>Sometime around October 20, 1788, Patrick Henry rode from his seventeen-hundred-acre farm in Prince Edward, Virginia, to a session of the General Assembly in Richmond. Henry is now famous for having declared, on the eve of the Revolution, “Give me …