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Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin Turns to Congress for a Bailout

The commercial space travel startup founded by Amazon's chief executive could soon receive $10 billion in taxpayer funding. After rival SpaceX won NASA's contract to build a lunar lander, lawmakers put together funding so Blue Origin could be awarded a similar bid. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders says he's opposed to giving one of the wealthiest people in the world any money. It's just another battle in the Bezos and Elon Musk space war.

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Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin Turns to Congress for a Bailout
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8 stories in this Storyboard
    Senate Preparing $10 Billion Bailout Fund for Jeff Bezos Space Firm

    Senate Preparing $10 Billion Bailout Fund for Jeff Bezos Space Firm

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    The Intercept - Sara Sirota

    Bezos’s Blue Origin lost its bid for a major NASA contract to Elon Musk, but the Senate is ordering the agency to give a second one now. Now that Jeff …

    Blue Origin’s loss to SpaceX on the lunar lander contract may get Congress to do something it hadn’t done before: Give NASA extra money

    Blue Origin’s loss to SpaceX on the lunar lander contract may get Congress to do something it hadn’t done before: Give NASA extra money

    For the past couple of years, top NASA officials have lobbied Congress to give the space agency enough money so that it could land the next astronauts on the moon by 2024. To meet that goal, NASA requested $3.3 billion for this year to develop a spacecraft capable of ferrying the first humans to …

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    The Billionaires Fighting For the Moon

    The Billionaires Fighting For the Moon

    By The Science Desk

    Two of the richest people in the world are vying over the rights to build a spacecraft that'll help return Americans to the moon. NASA recently awarded Elon Musk's SpaceX a $2.9 billion contract to develop a lunar vehicle, but Amazon's Jeff Bezos is protesting the decision. What's at stake is more than bragging rights: It's the fate of what's considered the centerpiece of the U.S.' ambitious Artemis project.

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