ryandhindsa

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New findings about the human genome bring us closer to schizophrenia treatment

An international team of doctors from the University of North Carolina, MIT, Harvard, and the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm have taken a major step toward pinpointing the genetic causes of schizophrenia. The mental illness affecting some 24 million people worldwide has so far proven incurable, …

An Eye Exam in a Pocket!

This is aweome!! <br>Uvealblues<p>Cataracts cloud Mirriam Waithara's world and leave her almost blind.<p>She lives in a poor and remote part of Kenya where …

And the Genomes Keep Shrinking…

Science & InnovationThe Loom<p>Here are a few numbers about DNA–some big ones, and then some very small ones.<p>The human genome contains about 3.2 billion base pairs. Last year, scientists at the University of Leceister printed the sequence out in 130 massive reference-book-sized volumes for a museum …

Pioneering gene therapy trials offer hope for heart patients

Gene therapy may offer new hope for those with heart failure struggling to live a normal life if the first British trials in humans, announced on Tuesday, are successful.<p>The two trials, involving about 250 patients, will look at whether the pioneering treatment is safe, reduces emergency admissions …

The Lurker: How A Virus Hid In Our Genome For Six Million Years

In the mid-2000s, David Markovitz, a scientist at the University of Michigan, and his colleagues took a look at the blood of people infected with HIV. Human immunodeficiency viruses kill their hosts by exhausting the immune system, allowing all sorts of pathogens to sweep into their host’s body. So …

Getting medicines to the poor: solving the logistics challenge

Here's the million-dollar health supply chain question: how does Coca-Cola get to remote villages while essential medications can't?<p>No one need make the case for improving access to basic drugs for 'bottom of the pyramid' communities: a healthy population is central to development. Yet, with the …

10 Bioengineered Body Parts That Could Change Medicine

When physicians run out of treatment options, they look to a nascent field known as bioengineering for solutions to their patients' ailments. …

ColaLife: Simon Berry is trying to make medicine as ubiquitous as Coca-Cola in rural Africa.

<i>To get vital medicines to children in need throughout Zambia, entrepreneur Simon Berry started taking cues from Coca-Cola.</i><p><b>How did you get the idea</b> …

In rural ERs, kids get better care with telemedicine

<b>UC DAVIS (US) —</b> After a live videoconference with a specialist, rural emergency room physicians are more likely to adjust diagnosis and course of …

Could E. coli protein lead to new antibiotics?

<b>WASHINGTON U.-ST. LOUIS (US) —</b> New details about how proteins in two bacterial strains delay cell division point to a potential method for designing …

Flood of dopamine may fuel desire to drink

<b>MCGILL (CAN) —</b> A pathway in our brains that makes us crave reward goes into high gear when some people take a drink.<p>Compared to people at low risk …

Chronic stress during pregnancy tied to early labor

<b>EMORY (US) —</b> High levels of stress during pregnancy for minority and low-income women may help explain higher rates of preterm labor.<p>Researchers have …

Genetic map of cancer reveals trails of mutation that lead to disease

The first detailed map of genetic faults that cause cancers is published today, offering profound insights into the disease.<p>The map describes more than 20 "genetic signatures", or patterns of mutation, that alone or in combination drive 30 different types of cancer, including brain, lung, pancreas …

Doctors Without Borders Is Forced to Abandon Somalia

This article is from the archive of our partner .<p>Despite more than two decades of bringing medical care to one of the most dangerous countries in the …

Watch Lab-Grown Heart Tissue Beat On Its Own [Video]

Be still my heart.<p>A team of scientists from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine has created lab-grown human heart tissue that can beat on its own, according to a new study in <i>Nature Communications</i>.<p>In 2008, a University of Minnesota study showed that the original cells from a rat heart …

Gene Therapies Add Promise to Regenerative Medicine

<b>What's the Latest Development?</b><p>Regenerative medicine, which seeks to regrow lost or damaged human body parts ranging from patches of skin to entire …

Down's syndrome cells 'fixed' in first step towards chromosome therapy

Scientists have corrected the genetic fault that causes Down's syndrome – albeit in isolated cells – raising the prospect of a radical therapy for the disorder.<p>In an elegant series of experiments, US researchers took cells from people with DS and silenced the extra chromosome that causes the …

What is the Future of Sequencing a Patient's Genome for Precision Medical Care?

<i>This question originally appeared on Quora.</i> <b><br>Answer by Jae Won Joh, M.D.:</b><p>Genome sequencing will help us create narrower subcategories of …

NIH Issues Guidelines For HeLa Cell Genome Data

The 2010 bestseller <i>The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks</i> highlighted ethical controversies surrounding scientists' use of HeLa cells. The cells are descended from a tumor taken without consent from Henrietta Lacks, a poor black woman who died in 1951. Ethical concerns resurfaced with the publication …