Rochelle Wilson

17 Flips | 1 Magazine | 2 Followers | @rochellejourney | Keep up with Rochelle Wilson on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Rochelle Wilson”

A young woman went to her grandmother and told her about her life and how things were so hard for her. She did not know how she was going to make it and wanted to give up. She was tired of fighting and struggling. It seemed as one problem was solved a new one arose. Her grandmother took her to the kitchen. She filled three pots with water. In the first, she placed carrots, in the second she placed eggs and the last she placed ground coffee beans. She let them sit and boil without saying a word. In about twenty minutes she turned off the burners. She fished the carrots out and placed them in a bowl. She pulled the eggs out and placed them in a bowl. Then she ladled the coffee out and placed it in a bowl. Turning to her granddaughter, she asked, "Tell me what do you see?" Click >> http://jlyou.org/11IZwSZ << to finish the story, then tell us which you are! ~ Jesus Loves You

Puppet Master - Part 1

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Ten Vegetables You Can Grow in Shade It's a common misconception that the only site to grow vegetables in s one that's in full sun. For some vegetables, such as tomatoes, peppers, and squash, this is entirely true. But those of us who have shade are not doomed to a life without homegrown produce. Basically, a good rule to remember is that if you grow a plant for the fruit or the root, it needs full sun. If you grow it for the leaves, stems, or buds, shade is just fine. Keep in mind, no vegetable will grow in full shade. The following crops will produce with three to six hours of sun per day. Salad Greens, such as leaf lettuce, arugula, endive, cress, and radicchio Broccoli Cauliflower Peas Beets Brussels Sprouts Radishes Swiss Chard Leafy Greens, such as collards, mustard greens, spinach, and kale Beans The best thing about knowing that these crops will successfully grow in some shade is that you'll be able to get more produce from your garden. Suppose, like most home gardeners, you've sited the vegetable garden in the one area of your yard that gets full sun. Use that space to grow the sun-lovers: the peppers, tomatoes, eggplants, corn, and squashes. The other crops, those that do well in the shade, can be tucked in anywhere. Grow some beets or swiss chard in your part-sun perennial border. Grow some lettuce or radishes in a container or window box. Make use of the space you have, in both sun and shade, can easily double the amount of vegetables you usually get. And homegrown produce, whether it's a fresh, juicy beefsteak tomato or a crisp, spicy radish, will spoil you forever against the bland, boring produce at your local grocer. Being able to step out into your own yard to gather ingredients for an impromptu salad or side dish is a joy, and if you make the most of your space, you'll be harvesting the fruits of your labor from spring through fall, and quite possibly beyond.

You Can Do It! First-Time Vegetable Gardening for the Black-Thumbed

Some of you may feel like no matter what you try to grow, it dies. Too much water, not enough water, too much sun, too much shade, or… it just dies …