Health Science & Human Biology on Flipboard

By Roald Bøe | Roald Bøe created a magazine on Flipboard. “Health Science & Human Biology on Flipboard” is available with thousands of other magazines and all the news you care about. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Roald Bøe”.

Oldest Human DNA Reveals Mysterious Branch of Humanity

The oldest known human DNA found yet reveals human evolution was even more confusing than thought, researchers say.

The DNA, which dates back some …

DNA

Britain’s obesity epidemic fuelled by sheer abundance of food

Britain produces and imports far more food than is needed, leading to an overabundance of calories

Britain’s obesity epidemic is being fuelled by the sheer abundance of food, researchers have warned, after finding that there are around 50 per cent more calories available to each person than …

Food (UK)

Minor changes turned Black Death germ from mild to murderous

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The bacterium Yersinia pestis has inflicted almost unimaginable misery upon humankind over the centuries, killing an estimated 200 million or more people and triggering horrific plagues in the 6th and 14th centuries.

But this germ was not always particularly dangerous. …

Genetics

Optogenetics Meets CRISPR | The Scientist Magazine®

FLICKR, INDI SAMARAJIVAThe CRISPR gene-editing system just got even better: a new light-activated Cas9 nuclease could offer researchers greater …

Optogenetics

Scientists have made the first fully functional artificial human brain cells

It seems that growing miniature brains in the lab just wasn't good enough for neuroscientists, as a group of researchers have now constructed an artificial neuron that works like the real thing. Amazingly, the fake cell manages to capture the fundamental signal-transmitting function of neurons and …

The Brain

Hope for Alzheimer's treatment as researchers find licensed drugs halt brain degeneration

Two licensed drugs have been shown to halt brain degeneration in mice, raising the prospect of a rapid acceleration in the search for a medicine to beat Alzheimer’s disease.

The results, presented on Tuesday at the Alzheimer’s Society annual research conference in Manchester, have been hailed as …

The Brain

Optogenetics Research Opens New Approaches for Brain Mapping, Repair | AAAS - The World's Largest General Scientific Society

In optogenetics, light-sensitive proteins are genetically targeted to specific cells, which can then be activated or silenced by light. | Sputnik …

The Brain
Chemistry

Scientists look into why most Alzheimer's patients are women

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer's disease are women, and now some scientists are questioning the long-held assumption that it's just because they tend to live longer than men.

What else may put woman at extra risk? Could it be genetics? Biological differences in how …

Women in Science

Pharmacogenetics: What It Is and Why You Need to Know

Changing the Future of Health Care

When the human genetic code was cracked about 10 years ago,it brought with it the expectation of immediate application to human disease. Pronouncements that there would soon be a cure for cancer and heart diseaes, now that we knew the genes causing them were …

Genetics

Scientists have built artificial neurons that fully mimic human brain cells

Researchers have built the world’s first artificial neuron that’s capable of mimicking the function of an organic brain cell - including the ability …

The Brain

Specific Calcium Channel Plays a Crucial Role in Healthy Sleep

According to a new study, the Cav3.1 calcium channel plays an important role in normal sleep.

Neuroscience

Patient safety evaluated at St. Mary's hospital

(CNN) — The nation's largest accrediting agency for hospitals is evaluating "patient safety-related events at St. Mary's Medical Center" in Florida, which .

"The Joint Commission is aware of patient safety-related events at St. Mary's Medical Center," according to a statement by the commission. "The …

Hospitals

Meet the female Brian Cox

A hit at the Hay Festival, neuroscientist Dr Hannah Critchlow has big plans for the future. She shares them with Bryony Gordon

On an average working day, Dr Hannah Critchlow has the privilege of watching the brain come alive in bright, electric lights. She maps its circuits, sees how they are …

Psychiatry

Neuroscience: The hard science of oxytocin

As researchers work out how oxytocin affects the brain, the hormone is shedding its reputation as a simple cuddle chemical.

In April 2011, Robert …

Medical Journals

Researchers have finally found out how an essential vitamin causes zits

Flickr/Steve Depolo

Vitamin B12 causes a normal skin bacteria to produce pimple-promoting chemicals.

Both people with clear skin and those with acne have Propionibacterium acnes living on their skin. But bacteria from acne sufferers have a different metabolism than microbes from the pimple-free, …

Scientific Research

Why We Speak

An evolutionary biologist argues that humans started talking because they needed to negotiate.

Sometime around 120,000 years ago in the desert near Oued Djebbana, in what is modern-day northern Algeria, a human acquired some small seashells. The shells were from a species known as Nassarius …

Language

14 percent of people living with HIV in 2011 didn’t know they were infected

In 2011, about 1.2 million people were living with HIV in the US. Unfortunately, 14 percent of those people didn’t know they were infected, according to a CDC report released today. And as of 2012, only five states in the US had met the National HIV/AIDS Strategy objective of making sure that at …

Statistics

DNA Evidence Is Not Foolproof

Believing it blindly could put the wrong people in jail

Since it made its courtroom debut in the mid-1980s, DNA evidence has been integral to thousands of cases (including, famously, the OJ Simpson murder trial). Juries and lawyers alike generally consider DNA evidence to be extremely reliable—a …

DNA

Scientists crack gene secret that lets poppies make morphine

LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists have identified a key gene used by poppies to make morphine, paving the way for better methods of producing the medically important drug, potentially without the need for cultivating poppy fields.

The latest finding follows recent success in engineering brewer's yeast …

Morphine

The first imperative: Science that isn’t transparent isn’t science

In today’s issue of Science Magazine we unveil a series of guidelines to promote transparency and reproducibility in research practices - critical aspects of science that are frequently overlooked in the pursuit of novelty and impact.

Transparency and reproducibility are the beating heart of the …

Scientific Research

Leading Health Experts Call For Fossil Fuel Divestment to Avert Climate Change

'Divestment rests on the premise that it is wrong to profit from an industry whose core business threatens human and planetary health'

More than 50 of the world’s leading doctors and health researchers called on charities to divest from fossil fuel companies in an open letter Thursday. The letter, …

Climate Change

New Oxytocin Neuroscience Counters "Cuddle Hormone" Claims

Researchers are still working out the nuances of how oxytocin affects the brain, with few studies definitively linking autism to problems in oxytocin …

Neuroscience

The Epigenetic Diversity of Neurons

According to a new study, researchers have successfully profiled key features of genetic materials inside three types of neurons.

Scientific Research

Mushroom used in Chinese medicine 'slows weight gain'

A mushroom used for centuries in Chinese medicine reduces weight gain in animals, say researchers in Taiwan.

The study, published in Nature Communications, suggested Ganoderma lucidum slowed weight gain by altering bacteria in the gut.

The researchers suggested the mushroom could eventually be used in …

Public Broadcasters

New insight into how brain makes memories

Every time you make a memory, somewhere in your brain a tiny filament reaches out from one neuron and forms an electrochemical connection to a …

Viagra ‘may raise the risk of skin cancer by 30 per cent’

Scientists found a small increased risk of developing skin cancer for men who were prescribed erectile dysfunction drugs like Viagra

Millions of men who use Viagra and similar drugs for erectile dysfunction could be at greater risk of developing skin cancer, researchers have warned.

A study of more …

Cancer

Parkinson’s May Begin in Gut and Spread to the Brain Via the Vagus Nerve

According to a new study, Parkinson's disease could begin in the gut and spread to the brain via the vagus nerve.

The Brain

More Than Two Thirds of Americans Are Overweight or Obese

Most U.S. adults are an unhealthy weight

Most Americans are overweight, according to a new study looking at overweight and obesity rates in the United States.

In a report published in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis studied data from 2007 …

Obesity