Ryan B

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Here’s everything you need to know about the Heartbleed web security flaw

It seems as though every week or so there’s a new hack or exploit that reveals millions of passwords or important data from a popular web service, …

Against Medical Recommendations, FDA Approves Potent New Painkiller

The FDA's medical advisory board voted against approving Zohydro, an opioid painkiller drug with up to 10 times more hydrocodone than Vicodin.<p>The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers prescription painkiller overdoses a public health epidemic, calling prescription drug abuse the …

Underwater Room At Pemba Island's Manta Resort Unveiled (PHOTOS)

If you've ever dreamed of sleeping under the sea, à la The Little Mermaid, your dreams can soon become reality at the Manta Resort's new underwater room.<p>The Manta Resort is located on Pemba Island, part of the Zanzibar archipelago off the coast of East Africa. The resort's newest feature allows …

The 20 big questions in science

1 What is the universe made of?<p>Astronomers face an embarrassing conundrum: they don’t know what 95% of the universe is made of. Atoms, which form everything we see around us, only account for a measly 5%. Over the past 80 years it has become clear that the substantial remainder is comprised of two …

The 17 Designs That Bell Almost Used for the Layout of Telephone Buttons

Among them: "the ten-pin," "the cross," and "the rainbow"<p>If you look at the number buttons on a phone -- smart, cell, landline, what have you -- those number buttons will feature, almost inevitably, a uniform layout. Ten digits, laid out on a three-by-three grid, with the tenth tacked on on the …

5 Body Parts Scientists Can 3-D Print

The Week In Numbers: On-Demand Quantum Teleportation, A New Mammal Species, And More

<b>2 pounds</b>: the weight of the olinguito, an adorable carnivorous mammal species just discovered in South America<p><b>20 millikelvins</b>: the temperature at which scientists recently achieved reliable, on-demand quantum teleportation<p><b>700 miles per hour</b>: the speed at which Elon Musk's proposed Hyperloop railway …

How We Remember To Remember

The way our brain handles remembering to remember something, called prospective memory, has been somewhat of a mystery to scientists, until now.<p>"Remind me not to forget…" I often say to my roommate. My phone charger. The sandwich I made to take to work. The bill I need to put in the mail.<p>The way …

How 3-D Printing Body Parts Will Revolutionize Medicine

Welcome to the age of bioprinting, where the machines we've built are building bits and pieces of us.<p>A device the size of an espresso machine quietly whirs to life. The contraption isn't filled with fresh, pungent grounds but, instead, spoonfuls of opaque, sterile goo. Its robotic arm moves …

Grow stem cells in lab with one simple step

<b>U. PITTSBURGH (US) —</b> By blocking a single protein, it’s possible to grow large batches of stems cells from mature mammalian cells, researchers …

Stem Cells

I think, therefore I heal: the weird science of neurofeedback

It's been dismissed as bunk science for decades. But does neurofeedback deserve a second look?<p>Imagine if treating a mental illness was as simple as playing a video game — except your mind is the controller. That idea isn’t only real, it’s a therapy gaining traction in the medical community and …

To harness HIV, make it get ‘naked’

<b>EMORY (US) —</b> A new understanding of how HIV “gets dressed” in the human cells it has taken over could lead to new antiretroviral drugs, researchers …

Immunotherapy

As superbugs gain ground, antibiotic development slows to a crawl

Antibiotic resistance is rapidly becoming a critical public health risk, with a growing number of bacteria developing resistance to a wide swath of drugs. Despite the threat posed by these so-called "superbugs," however, a new report warns that the number of antibiotics being created to thwart them …

Applicants wanted for a one-way ticket to Mars

<b>Want to go to Mars? Dutch organisation Mars One says it will open applications imminently. It would be a one-way trip, and the company hopes to build a community of settlers on the planet.</b><p>Uncharted waters, mountains or far away lands have always drawn explorers. History books show that desire for …

Life on Mars

THE vehicle drove through a wasteland of jagged rock. Just before a sharp curve, its headlights revealed a dark, yawning hole only a tick to the …

Galaxy S4 mini shows up in Samsung code

Did you ever think a time would come that a 4.3” phone would be considered “mini”? On the flipside, did you ever think anyone would really want a 6.3” <i>phone</i>? Well, if you were Samsung, and were driving the Android device landscape, you did.<p>The expected arrival of the Galaxy S4 mini is getting …

Artificially reconnecting damaged tissue could restore movement in paralytics

Paralyzed individuals currently rely on robotic prosthetics to recover their lost movement, but new research shows that natural movement may be able to be restored by reconnecting damaged parts of an individual's nervous system. Researchers in Tokyo, Japan and Seattle, Washington demonstrated that …

Female octopuses stretch further

Reporter, BBC Nature<p>Female octopuses go to extra lengths when stretching their arms to reach food, a study has found.<p>Scientists in Italy measured octopuses' arm extensions as they reached up a tube towards tasty bait.<p>They found for the first time that octopuses' arm elongation ability differed …

Have scientists found dark matter?

Have scientists finally found dark matter?<p>It is important because it accounts for a quarter of all the mass and energy in the Universe.<p>Today will hear the first results from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, which was bolted on to the International Space Station and which has been scanning the …

Watery Gecko Grip Could Lead to Stickier Tape

The reptiles can stick to wet surfaces that are water resistant, study says.<p><b>Scientists have long known that geckos can scurry up walls, Spider-Man style.</b><p>But less well understood is how these reptiles cling to wet surfaces, which are common in their rainy tropical habitats.<p>The answer, a new study …

Lego-style templates build complex tissue

<b>COLUMBIA U. (US) —</b> A new way to fabricate tissue—such as heart, skeleton, or vasculature—uses tiny shapes to organize cells on a hydrogel …

National Academy of Sciences

Proteins link blood clot trouble, immune system

<b>RICE (US) —</b> There’s an unexpected connection between a protein that triggers the formation of blood clots and other proteins that are key to the …

Immune System

Faster-Than-Light Drive

Instead of using rockets or thrusters, a craft equipped with warp drive would move by distorting space.<p>The warp drive proposed by Miguel Alcubierre would achieve faster-than-light speeds by distorting space-time. The device would generate a field of negative energy that would squeeze or stretch …

A Working Transistor Built Out Of DNA Within A Living Cell

We're this close to having a usable biocomputer.<p>Pretty much anything can be a computer, if it can compute logical functions, store data, and transmit information -- even living cells. A team at Stanford University has accomplished one of the the final tasks necessary to turn cells into working …

Today In Important Science: Cats Are Particular About What They Pee On

The European wildcat has a favorite place to pee, just like George Costanza.<p>Cats, and many other mammals, like to pee on things. It's called "urine marking," and acts as a form of communication through scent (and, to a lesser extent, a visual signal). A new, very important study in the Journal of …

Sea lion blows scientists' minds by head-bobbing to the Backstreet Boys

Researchers at the University of California in Santa Cruz have successfully trained a sea lion to bob its head in time to music, in a study that may change our understanding of how rhythm is acquired. Previously, report the team in the <i>Journal of Comparative Psychology</i>, it was thought that only …

The science behind the new foot-and-mouth disease vaccine

A paper describing a new synthetic vaccine for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) was all over the news this week and rightly so — it's an impressive …