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The horizon is central to Sugimoto's work; it describes the contact between Earth's surface and the ether and is also a metaphor for the bounds of our mental and visual perception. Featured Artwork of the Day: Hiroshi Sugimoto (Japanese, born Tokyo, 1948) | Boden Sea, Uttwil | 1993 | © Hiroshi Sugimoto http://met.org/1rCQp2s

Tree Lights by Judson Beaumont

Painting by Cindy Wright

Paintings by Meghan Howland

Lamp Installations by Rune Guneriussen

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1.26 by Janet Echelman who visualised an earthquake, followed by a tsunami that took place in Chile in 2010. The name of the light sculpture ’1.26′ is inspired by the fact that the earthquake postponeed the earth’s axis, thus shortened the day by 1.26 micro seconds.

What Lies Beneath by Gabby O’Connor

Installation by Henrique Oliveira

Smeared Sky by Matt Molloy who stacks hundreds of shots, taken from a time lapse video, to create painting like images

Smeared Sky by Matt Molloy who stacks hundreds of shots, taken from a time lapse video, to create painting like images.

In collaboration with the Duomo and Opera d’Arte in Milan, international art collective Cracking Art Group created and placed 50 blue sna…

In collaboration with the Duomo and Opera d’Arte in Milan, international art collective Cracking Art Group created and placed 50 blue snail sculptures on the cathedral’s roof to call attention to much-needed repairs and restoration. The snails are made from recycled plastic and allude to the gradual deterioration of the architecture.

Polaroid Photography by Sean Rohde

35mm Photography by James Goddard

A Symbiotic Union of Paint and Photo by Parisian Artist Labokoff

postculture:

<b>Art and Institution</b><p>In 1956, Morris Weitz challenged the foundations of modern aesthetics when he declared that the question “what is art?” was the wrong question for aestheticians to be asking. Instead he proposed that the question that should be fundamental to aesthetics is “what kind of concept is ‘art’?” thus starting one of the largest debates in contemporary aesthetics. Morris argued against essentialism in art, and instead proposed that art was an open concept.<p>Fifteen years later, the …

by Bastian K.