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Death Traps: How Carnivorous Plants Catch Their Prey

The Venus Flytrap’s snap trap is one of five ways meat-eating plants catch their dinner.<p>Image: Number One/Shutterstock<p>A new species of meat-eating …

Carnivorous Plant Keeps House With Ants

Fanged pitcher plants provide home for ants that get their hosts more nutrients.<p><b>Deep in a forest on the island ofBorneo (map), an ant wanders around on acarnivorous plant, seemingly courting a grisly death. But new research shows that thediving ant (Camponotus schmitzi) has nothing to fear from</b> …

Meat-Eating Plants Getting "Full" On Pollution

Carnivorous plants in nitrogen-rich bogs eat fewer bugs, new study says.<p><b>Carnivorous plants in Sweden are so stuffed on nitrogen pollution that they're able to eat fewer bugs—and that may not be a good thing for the plants, a new study says.</b><p>Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for all plants. But, like …

Carnivorous plant doesn't have time for any of that junk DNA

New Meat-Eating Plant Species Found In Japan

"Meat-eating," not "man-eating." Still cool though.<p>According to Japan Times, a new species of carnivorous plant has been found in Aichi Prefecture, on the central-southern coast of Japan's main island. The Japan Times calls it a "pitcher plant," which it is not; as a species related to (and …

Canadian Scientists Suggest Plants Show Altruistic Behavior | Public Radio International

When people say, "It's a jungle out there," they generally mean that the world can be cold and heartless. Yet it turns out that a literal jungle may not be so uncaring after all. A team of Canadian scientists has found that some plants recognize their siblings–and help them. Anna Rothschild of our …