Pavel Shatunov

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How Information Theory Unifies Quantum Mechanics

A new framework ties together wave-particle duality and quantum uncertainty with bits.<p>Two parallel mysteries of quantum mechanics, so-called wave-particle duality and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, are in reality one and the same. This is according to a new framework developed by physicists …

Quantum Mechanics

What Your "Working Memory" Does (and How to Give It a Tune-Up)

Working memory is like your brain's scratch pad, managing information as you go about your day. But our routine deluge of information can make us …

Bacterial Motors Come in a Dizzying Array of Models

Bacteria that can swim propel themselves with corkscrew tails anchored in rotary motors. That may seem surprisingly mechanical for a microbe, but it …

World's first artificial enzymes created using synthetic biology

(Phys.org)—Medical Research Council (MRC) scientists have created the world's first enzymes made from artificial genetic material. Their synthetic …

Watch the magic of sound and science in 'Cymatics'

Sound never looked so good<p>Tallying up nearly two million views across Vimeo and YouTube in two weeks, my favorite thing on the internet today is still "Cymatics," a music video from Nigel Stanford from his new album Solar Echoes. Stanford put together a series of science experiments that …

Which desktop 3D printer should you buy this holiday season?

Advertisement<p>4 Comments<p>Credit: MakeX<p>If you’re an early adopter who is more likely to buy a drone or a smartwatch than a big screen this holiday …

Scientists Are More Creative Than You Might Imagine

But original thinking could be declining among students because of the growing emphasis on test-taking in schools.<p>Scientists don’t usually have a reputation for being very creative. They have to adhere to the scientific method, use statistics and data, and carefully measure their results—activities …

Neil deGrasse Tyson explaining black holes is just as awesome as it sounds

Sorry “Interstellar,” Tyson explains that you don’t want to be anywhere near a black hole<p>Neil deGrasse Tyson broke down the physics of two mysterious aspects of our universe: wormholes and black holes. In this recent video for Business Insider, Tyson explains why you wouldn't want to venture into a …

Up Close, Dried Whiskey Looks Like the Cosmos

Ernie Button's 'Painting Pictures with Whiskey' photos reveal the beauty at the bottom of your bourbon.<p>Artist Ernie Button's is embarking upon a study of chemistry and fluid dynamics, but with a twist that would make Hemingway proud: by using microscopic techniques to analyze the remains of dried …

Whiskey

Science fiction: How not to build a future society

Science fiction films have many warnings for us – not least, how the road to a perfect future society is fraught with peril. Quentin Cooper loads up the DVD player to see what lessons we can learn.<p>Science-fiction films sometimes offer us a future so bright we’ve got to wear shades. But mostly we’re …

Science Fiction

China Shows Off Holographic Ground Control System for Drones

Drone Sold Separately<p>AVIC, China's top aerospace manufacturer, is finding unexpected but sci-fi inspired ways to push the drone technological envelope. The Holographic Ground Control System (GCS) displays a holographic image of the drone, making it easier for the controller to intitutively …

Augmented Reality

DNA survives sub-orbital trip on the exterior of a rocket

DNA molecules smeared onto the exterior of a sub-orbital test rocket are capable of surviving a 13-minute trip into space and a scorching re-entry, European researchers say.<p>The scientists' surprising finding, which was published Wednesday in the journal PLOS One, suggests that genetic material is …

Engineers, linguists and other heroes

Michael Abraham pays tribute to Tommy Flowers, who designed and built the Colossus computer (Letters, 18 November). I would add another hidden hero on the engineering side: Harold “Doc” Keene, who worked for the British Tabulating Machine Co in Letchworth and turned the Turing’s ideas into useable …

Which Came First, The Chicken Or The Egg? [Video]

Introducing a new video series—and an answer to the mother of all questions<p>Welcome to our newest video series, called Ask Us Anything! And we really mean it. In each video, we'll answer the odd-ball, amusing, or just plain confounding questions you have about the world around you. We drew …

Food

'Nanoreactor' works like a virtual chemistry set - Futurity

A computer model that chemists call a "nanoreactor" could speed up drug development, as well as improve the efficiency of batteries and fuel …

Chemistry

New 2-D quantum materials for nanoelectronics

Researchers at MIT say they have carried out a theoretical analysis showing that a family of two-dimensional materials exhibits exotic quantum …

How Iron Man's Arc Reactor (Probably) Works

Since the <i>Iron Man</i> arc reactor is a fictitious device, and it has no <i>official</i> scientific explanation in the Iron Man canon that I'm aware of, we might …

Seven steps to creating a brain implant

Scientists are starting to build implants they hope can cure blindness and help paralysed people walk. But how do they work?<p>The brain is one of the most delicate and complex objects in the universe, so tinkering with its activity may seem like a fool’s errand. Yet armed with a growing understanding …

Neurophilosophy

These Adaptable, Self-Replicating Robots Surely Won't Tear The World Apart ... Right?

But they could help out in emergencies or on distant planets<p>Watching the University of Oslo’s three-limbed robot squirm across the floor like a dismembered starfish brings to mind shudder-inducing flashbacks of Stargate SG-1. More particularly, visions of SG-1’s creepy-crawly nemesis, the …

How Supercomputing Is Cracking The Mysteries Of Human Origins

The power of petaflops penetrates the mists of time<p>A Texas supercomputer capable of 9.6 quadrillion operations per second has solved a thorny problem in genetics, by looking at the bones of a young boy who died 24,000 years ago in Mal’ta in south-central Siberia.<p>Existing genetic models have …

The world's smallest sculptures - in pictures

Jonty Hurwitz, co-founder of Wonga.com, has created nanosculptures of human forms that are invisible to the naked eye and can only be viewed on the screen of a powerful scanning electron microscope

Brain damage could be repaired by creating new nerve cells

Researchers have regenerated damaged areas in the brains of mice by converting structural cells into functioning neurons<p>Scientists have raised hopes that brain damage caused by strokes, stab wounds and even bullets could one day be repaired by converting structural cells into functioning …

3D-printed actuators built to swim in your body - Futurity

Scientists are using microscopic 3D printing to create tiny actuators that might one day deliver drugs inside the human body.