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Nearly a third of the world’s oceans and land should be protected by 2030 to stem extinctions and ensure humanity lives in harmony with nature, 195 countries say in a proposed UN plan

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    • Endangered Species
    • United Nations
UN plan would protect 30% of oceans and land to stem extinctions
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    UN plan would protect 30% of oceans and land to stem extinctions

    UN plan would protect 30% of oceans and land to stem extinctions

    Nearly a third of the world’s oceans and land should be protected by 2030 to stem extinctions and ensure humanity lives in harmony with nature. That …

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    The search for the origin of life: From panspermia to primordial soup

    Did life begin suddenly in a chemical big bang, or did the ingredients come together slowly, bit by bit from a primordial soup? All we know for sure is that life on Earth began sometime between the formation of the planet 4.5 billion years ago and the oldest confirmed fossils 3.4 billion years ago, a window of 1.1 billion years. From Charles Darwin onwards, many scientists have put forward theories about how life got started. Experiments have sought to recreate the conditions of early Earth to see if we can coax simple molecules into something resembling life. Some have even proposed that that life came to Earth from space, a theory called panspermia. This week’s Science with Sam goes in search of our oldest ancestors. Though the answers are still shrouded in mystery, recent findings are taking us closer than ever to the origin of life. Subscribe to New Scientist magazine using the discount code SAM20 - http://newscientist.com/subscribe

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