Nawal

41 Flips | 2 Magazines | 7 Likes | 7 Following | 1 Follower | @nawalster | Keep up with Nawal on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Nawal”

Climate Change and the Language of Mourning

There is the scientific and ideological language for what is happening to the weather, but there are hardly any intimate words. Is that surprising? …

Putin’s long game? Meet the Eurasian Union

What is Vladimir Putin up to? The crisis in Ukraine, brought to a boil when Russia’s president sent troops into the Crimean peninsula, has created …

Remembering Is a Social Act

The worry about mental laziness is a really big one; the idea that because we can turn to Wikipedia or turn to our phone and we can get an answer to …

The Brain

Cosmic Bulletins: Two Major Discoveries Rock Science

The Theory of General Relativity seemed truly bizarre when Albert Einstein first articulated it 99 years ago: gravity, the great physicist declared, …

Gravitational Waves: Einstein Was Right, Again, Maybe

Cosmologists hope for a field-rocking announcement next week.<p>What's the latest cosmology gossip? According to the Guardian, the field is awash with rumors that next week, American scientists will announce the detection of gravitational waves: incredibly small ripples carrying energy across the void …

Scientists Baffled by Mysterious Force Tossing Stars Out of Our Galaxy

Something is hitting stars in our Milky Way galaxy with such force that they are reaching the million-plus mile-per-hour velocity needed to break …

Weight and Weightlessness: The Science of Life in Space, in Charming Vintage Illustrations

As a lover of vintage children’s books, especially ones about science and space, I was thrilled to chance upon the 1971 gem <b>Weight and Weightlessness</b> (<i>public library</i>) by science writer and then-director of Hayden Planetarium educational services <b>Franklyn M. Branley</b> — which renders him cultural kin to …

How Not To Worry: Timeless 1934 Advice on Controlling Anxiety and Mastering Life

As far as vintage finds go, they hardly get more fortuitous than <b>You Can Master Life</b> (<i>public library</i>) — a marvelous 1934 compendium of sort-of-philosophical, sort-of-self-helpy, at times charmingly dated, other times refreshingly timeless advice on cultivating “the power to think, to create, to …

Denis Dutton’s Provocative Darwinian Theory of Beauty

What, exactly, is beauty? This question has been occupying the minds of philosophers, anthropologists, neuroscientists, art critics and ordinary people alike for centuries of human history. And while many may subscribe to the “beauty is in the eye of the beholder” theory, this, it turns out, may …

A Secret Illustrated History of Coffee, Coca, and Cola

On the heels of the year’s best picture-books and the question of what makes a great one comes <b>A Secret History of Coffee, Coca & Cola</b> (<i>UK</i>; <i>public library</i>) by Ricardo Cortés, the illustrator behind the irreverent modern classic <i>Go The Fuck To Sleep</i>. This fascinating and beautifully illustrated piece …

Hide/Seek: Portraits of Gender Identity and Sexual Difference in Art

Gender identity isn’t something openly discussed and studied as a shaping force in the arts (or , until recently, in science, for that matter), but it is a powerful one. <i>Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture</i> takes an ambitious look at the history of sexual difference, published as …

How To Be a Nonconformist: 22 Irreverent Illustrated Steps to Counterculture Cred from 1968

“Why do you have to be a nonconformist like everybody else?,” James Thurber asked in the caption to a 1958 <i>New Yorker</i> cartoon depicting a woman fed up with her artist partner. It remains unknown whether the cartoon itself, or this cultural dismay shared by some of the era’s counterculture thinkers, …

A Natural History of Love

<i>“You can never know anyone as completely as you want. But that’s okay, love is better,”</i> a wise woman wrote. But what, exactly, <i>is</i> love? Literary history has given us a wealth of beautiful definitions, mathematicians have calculated its odds, and psychologists have dissected its mechanisms. Love has …

Dog Songs: Mary Oliver on What Dogs Teach Us About the Meaning of Our Human Lives

<b>Mary Oliver</b> is not only one of the sagest and most beloved poets of our time, a recipient of a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award, but is also among literary history’s greatest pet-lovers. <b>Dog Songs</b> (<i>public library</i>) collects her most soul-stirring poems and short prose celebrating that special …

How to Make Love: A 1936 Guide to the Art of Wooing

<i>“Part of the modern ideology of love is to assume that love and sex always go together,”</i> Susan Sontag observed in her fantastic meditation on love, sex, and the world between, <i>“and probably the greatest problem for human beings is that they just don’t.”</i> And yet we still refer to sex as “making love.”<p>…

He dug so deeply into her sentiments that in... • literary jukebox

He dug so deeply into her sentiments that in search of interest he found love, because by trying to make her love him he ended up falling in love with her. Petra Cotes, for her part, loved him more and more as she felt his love increasing, and that was how in the ripeness of autumn she began to …

What Is Character? Debunking the Myth of Fixed Personality

We’ve previously explored what it means to be human and what defines a “person.” Much of our understanding of personhood hinges on what we call “character” — but what, exactly, is it? Here is an omnibus of definitions and insights from notable cross-disciplinary thinkers, from philosophy to …

How To Be Alone

<i>UPDATE: Now available as an illustrated book.</i><p>Modernity offers a curious paradox of connectedness and loneliness. Our perpetually networked selves cling to constant communication in an effort to avoid the deep-seated sense of loneliness we so dread. Somewhere along the way, we forget — or maybe …

Anton Chekhov on the 8 Qualities of Cultured People

What does it mean to be “cultured”? Is it about being a good reader, or knowing how to talk about books you haven’t read, or having a general disposition of intellectual elegance? That’s precisely the question beloved Russian author <b>Anton Chekhov</b> (January 29, 1860–July 15, 1904) considers in a …

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Made More Wonderful by Graphic Artist Michael Sieben

As a lover of beautifully illustrated children’s books, especially fresh takes on works by literary legends, I was thrilled to come across a brand new edition of <b>The Wonderful Wizard of Oz</b> (<i>public library</i>), L. Frank Baum’s indispensable addition to the best children’s books with timeless philosophy …

How to Be an Explorer of the World

As a longtime fan of guerrilla artist and illustrator Keri Smith’s <i>Wreck This Box</i> set of interactive journals, part of these 7 favorite activity books for grown-ups, I was delighted to discover her <b>How to Be an Explorer of the World: Portable Life Museum</b> (<i>public library</i>) — a wonderful compendium of …

A Visit to William Blake’s Inn: Vintage Illustrated Verses for Innocent and Experienced Travelers

As an admirer of literary personification, a lover of vintage children’s books — especially ones with a literary slant and especially illustrated children’s verses by famous poets — and a longtime fan of Alice and Martin Provensen, I was instantly taken with <b>A Visit to William Blake’s Inn: Poems for</b> …

Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Godmother of Rock and Roll, Live in Manchester in 1964

Reconstructionist and <i>Literary Jukebox</i> hero <b>Sister Rosetta Tharpe</b> (March 20, 1915–October 9, 1973) is celebrated as gospel music’s first superstar, the godmother of rock and roll, “the original soul sister.” No better way to celebrate her spirit and legacy than with her legendary, electrifying 1964 …

George Orwell, Feminist: The Beloved Author on Gender Equality in Work and Housework

Besides his great wisdom on why writers write and how to make the perfect cup of tea, <b>George Orwell</b> (June 25, 1903–January 21, 1950) also endures as a kind of cultural oracle who presaged the NSA era in <i>1984</i> and the Occupy era in <i>Animal Farm</i>. But it turns out he might have also presaged the <i>Lean In</i> era …

A Miraculous “Accident of Physics”: Carl Zimmer Explains How Feathers Evolved, Animated

Charles Darwin devoted nearly three chapters of his famed treatise <i>Descent of Man</i> to feathers — one of the most miraculous products of evolution. In his book <b>Feathers: The Evolution of a Natural Miracle</b> (<i>public library</i>), conservation biologist <b>Thor Hanson</b> marvels that “nothing competes with feathers …

Otto: The Autobiography of a Teddy Bear

One of the most persistent critiques of Western children’s literature has always been its lack of diversity, and one of the most powerful yet little-known counterpoints to that critique is <b>Otto: The Autobiography of a Teddy Bear</b> (<i>public library</i>) by the great <b>Tomi Ungerer</b>, originally published in …

If William Shakespeare Had Written Star Wars

Though <b>William Shakespeare</b> regularly dominates surveys of the greatest literature of all time, he remains a surprisingly controversial figure of literary history — while some believe The Bard profoundly changed modern life, others question whether he wrote anything at all. Doubts of authorship …

Why Pink Doesn’t Exist: An Illustrated Stop-Motion Science Explanation in 60 Seconds

If OK Go’s stop-motion color theory for <i>Sesame Street</i> met mathemagician Vi Hart’s hand-drawn math lessons, you’d get <i>Minute Physics</i> — charming and illuminating hand-illustrated science animations, like this fantastic explanation of how the color pink exists even though pink light doesn’t. (Pink, …

How the Universe Was Born: An Animated Explanation from CERN

The question of why the world exists has not only puzzled some of history’s greatest minds but has also, at one point or another, occurred to just about every human being. And yet the more we learn, the more we understand how little we actually know: The Big Bang, for instance, turns out to have …

What I saw as a Wall Street trader: a culture of bad behaviour

My first big trade on Wall Street was approved by a fat man smoking cigarettes in a stairway littered with the butts from past conversations. That man, John, was the head of trading at Salomon Brothers, on the executive board, and only one step below the CEO. It was 1994 and he had been with the …