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Humans are more than clever apes? Don't make me laugh

Most qualities we think of as particularly 'human' can be seen elsewhere in the animal kingdom, thanks to evolution<p>Just how special do you think you are? How different do you think you are from other animals? Do you think of yourself as an animal or do you see yourself, and your fellow humans, as …

School obesity rate shifts pregnancy risk - Futurity

PENN STATE (US) — As the prevalence of obesity rises in a high school, so …

Google Glass video shows how the device can be used in everyday life

A new Google Glass video shows you how the device can be successfully used in everyday life, giving you answers in situations you come across in various moments.<p>The video shows Googlers testing the device with various searches, some of them very funny, and putting Google’s search capabilities, and …

Google Glass

APOD: Surprising Comet ISON (2013 Nov 30) Image Credit: NASA, ESA, SOHO Video Editing: Babak Tafreshi (TWAN) Explanation: After failing to appear for Sun staring spacecraft at perihelion, its harrowing closest approach to the Sun, sungrazing Comet ISON was presumed lost. But ISON surprised observers yesterday as material still traveling along the comet's trajectory became visible and even developed an extensive fan-shaped dust tail. Edited and processed to HD format, this video (vimeo, youtube) is composed of frames from the SOHO spacecraft's coronographs. It follows the comet in view of the wide (blue tint) and narrow (red tint) field cameras in the hours both before and after perihelion passage. In both fields, overwhelming sunlight is blocked by a central occulting disk. A white circle indicates the Sun's positon and scale. With questions to be answered and the tantalizing possibility that a small cometary nucleus has survived in whole or part, surprising comet ISON will be rising before dawn in planet Earth's skies in the coming days. Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page #APOD

APOD: A New Year's Crescent (2014 Jan 01) Image Credit & Copyright: Jay Ouellet Explanation: That's not the young crescent Moon poised above the western horizon at sunset. Instead it's Venus in a crescent phase, captured with a long telephoto lens from Quebec City, Canada, planet Earth on a chilly December 30th evening. The very bright celestial beacon is droping lower into the evening twilight every day. But it also grows larger in apparent size and becomes a steadily thinner crescent in binocular views as it heads toward an inferior conjunction, positioned between the Earth and the Sun on January 11. The next few evenings will see a young crescent Moon join the crescent Venus in the western twilight, though. Historically, the first observations of the phases of Venus were made by Galileo with his telescope in 1610, evidence consistent with the Copernican model of the Solar System, but not the Ptolemaic system. Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page #APOD

APOD: Sunspot at Sunset (2014 Jan 08) Image Credit & Copyright: Jürg Alean Explanation: Sunsets may be the most watched celestial event, but lately sunsets have even offered something extra. A sunspot so large it was visible to the naked eye is captured in Swiss skies in this sunset scene from January 5, crossing left to right near the center of a solar disk dimmed and distorted by Earth's dense atomosphere. Detailed views reveal a large solar active region composed of sunspots, some larger than planet Earth itself. Cataloged as active region AR 1944, on January 7 it produced a substantial solar flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME) forecast to reach Earth. The CME could trigger geomagnetic storms and aurora on January 9. Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page #APOD

APOD: M83 Star Streams (2014 Jan 17) Image Credit & Copyright: R. Gendler, D. Martinez-Delgado (ARI-ZAH, Univ. Heidelberg), D. Malin (AAO), NAOJ, ESO, HLA - Assembly and Processing: Robert Gendler Explanation: Big, bright, and beautiful, spiral galaxy M83 lies a mere twelve million light-years away, near the southeastern tip of the very long constellation Hydra. This deep view of the gorgeous island universe includes observations from Hubble, along with ground based data from the European Southern Observatory's very large telescope units, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan's Subaru telescope, and Australian Astronomical Observatory photographic data by D. Malin. About 40,000 light-years across, M83 is popularly known as the Southern Pinwheel for its pronounced spiral arms. But the wealth of reddish star forming regions found near the edges of the arms' thick dust lanes, also suggest another popular moniker for M83, the Thousand-Ruby Galaxy. Arcing near the top of the novel cosmic portrait lies M83's northern stellar tidal stream, debris from the gravitational disruption of a smaller, merging satellite galaxy. The faint, elusive star stream was found in the mid 1990s by enhancing photographic plates. Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page #APOD

APOD: Light Pillars from a Little Planet (2014 Jan 31) Image Credit & Copyright: Janne Voutilainen Explanation: Eerie pillars of light ring the edges of this snowy little planet. Of course the little planet is planet Earth, shown in a nadir-to-zenith, around-the-horizon, little planet projection. The spherical panoramic image mosaic maps a view from Siilinjärvi in eastern Finland. Flat ice crystals, like those more often found in high, thin clouds, are gently fluttering in very cold air near the surface. The pillars of light appear as their briefly horizontal facets reflect upward directed light from ground sources downward, toward the observer. In fact, the fluttering crystals produce an effect analogous to the shimmering columns of moonlight or sunlight reflected by surface waves across water. Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page #APOD