Schusterman Library at OU-Tulsa

By Ms Hoberecht | Of interest to our patrons

The Great Uprising: How a Powder Revolutionized Baking

Today, if you need to make a last-minute birthday cake, you can grab a box of Betty Crocker cake mix, whisk it some oil and eggs, and pop it in the …

Boston

Take a Peep at This Gallery of Historic Selfies

The first-ever photograph was a still life. But it wasn’t long until people were taking pictures of one another.<p>“Portraits were the most commonly …

Secret Tunnels Under London, Once Used to Hide Art During WWI, Open to the Public for the First Time

You’ll soon be able to delve into a secret world of tunnels used to transport mail hundreds of years back when London’s Postal Museum opens on July …

London

Horse-Riding Librarians Were the Great Depression's Bookmobiles

Their horses splashed through iced-over creeks. Librarians rode up into the Kentucky mountains, their saddlebags stuffed with books, doling out …

Great Depression

Hunting for Antibiotics in the World’s Dirtiest Places

“Compost bin. Pig trough. Dog-food bowl. Laptop keyboard.”<p>Ona chilly autumn morning in northwest London, just outside the Euston train station, Adam Roberts stops at the top of an outdoor staircase, looks around for police, and tries to appear inconspicuous. This is harder than it sounds, and not …

Cocaine trafficking is destroying Central America’s forests

Drug trade has stripped Nicaragua of nearly one-third of its woodlands

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A Brief History of Children Sent Through the Mail

<i>Editor's Note, December 21, 2016 Listen to the Smithsonian perspective on this story from the Smithsonian’s new podcast, Sidedoor. Listen to the</i> …

Nine Places Where You Can Still See Wheel Tracks from the Oregon Trail

Any child of the 1980s is familiar with the basic skeleton of the Oregon Trail, from the celebrations warranted by a sight of Chimney Rock to the …

Endangered Balkan Lynx Kitten Photographed for the First Time in a Decade

Earlier this month, researchers in Macedonia discovered and photographed a Balkan lynx kitten, the first newborn from that critically endangered …

Why Sand Covers the Floor of One of the Western Hemisphere's Oldest Synagogues

Fleeing anti-Semitism in Europe, Jews found unexpected shelter on the island of Curaçao

Caribbean

Everything It Will Take to Get Faster Wi-Fi on Planes

Companies are vying to bring better internet to the skies, but the path to success is almost unbelievably complicated.<p>I bring tidings from the frontier of airplane Wi-Fi. I <i>experienced</i> faster internet with my own two thumbs aboard a 757! I did a series of speed tests and received between 17 and 27 …

How We Spend $3,400,000,000,000

Why more than half of America's healthcare spending goes to five percent of patients<p>Last year, America’s total medical costs hit a new record of $3.4 trillion, according to the federal government. That’s about 18 percent of the country’s total GDP, meaning that one out of every six dollars we spent …

What If (Almost) Every Gene Affects (Almost) Everything?

Three Stanford scientists have proposed a provocative new way of thinking about genetic variants, and how they affect people’s bodies and health.<p>In 1999, a group of scientists scoured the genomes of around 150 pairs of siblings in an attempt to find genes that are involved in autism. They came up …

An Artificial Intelligence Developed Its Own Non-Human Language

When Facebook designed chatbots to negotiate with one another, the bots made up their own way of communicating.<p>A buried line in a new Facebook report about chatbots’ conversations with one another offers a remarkable glimpse at the future of language.<p>In the report, researchers at the Facebook …

We may have accidentally formed a protective bubble around Earth

Radio waves might help protect us from space weather.<p>When the Navy wants to send a message to an underwater submarine, it sometimes uses very low frequency (VLF) radio waves. These long wavelengths, beamed from large towers on the ground, are unique in their ability to travel through salty water. …

Space Weather

Lake Michigan Is So Clear Right Now Its Shipwrecks Are Visible From the Air

Though the past winter was the hottest on record, it was chilly enough on the East Coast to send seasonal sheets of ice creeping across the Great …

The Woman Who Stood Between America and an Epidemic of Birth Defects

In 1960, America had a stroke of luck. That was when the application to begin mass-marketing the drug thalidomide in the United States landed on the …

Cats Had Clout Long Before the Internet

Nine lives before Grumpy Cat; way before Keyboard Cat played her first note, felines were revered by visual artists—even without the means to post …

Players and Listeners Both Prefer a New Violin to a Stradivarius

The old masterpieces lose for a third time in a new study.<p>In 2012, Claudia Fritz from Sorbonne University packed a small concert hall near Paris with 55 volunteers from the violin world, including musicians, violin makers, music critics, composers, and more. From the stage, she asked seven …

The Soviet Union's Scientific Marvels Came From Prisons

Faced with exile in Siberia, some of Russia's best scientists opted to do research for the government behind bars.<p>There’s no shortage of stories about clashes between science and politics throughout history, and there are plenty still being written today. Scientific evidence has been distorted and …

A New Addition to the Human Family Tree Is Surprisingly Young

Homo naledi was alive between 236,000 and 335,000 years ago, which complicates the story of human evolution.<p>The one thing everyone agrees is that the fossils themselves are spectacular. In 2015, researchers unveiled 1,500 hominin fossil fragments found deep in a South African cave, excavated by six …

The American Obsession with Lawns

<i>This article is a part of the Green Thumbery series, where everyday gardening meets history and science.</i><p>Warmer weather in the northern states means …

Here's what popular dog breeds looked like before and after 100 years of breeding

Dogs have been our furry companions for thousands of years, but they didn't always look the way they do today. Many well-known breeds have changed a lot physically in the last century, thanks to humans.<p>By identifying specific traits — such as size, coat color, and demeanor — and allowing only those …

Earth - There are diseases hidden in ice, and they are waking up

Throughout history, humans have existed side-by-side with bacteria and viruses. From the bubonic plague to smallpox, we have evolved to resist them, and in response they have developed new ways of infecting us.<p>We have had antibiotics for over a century, ever since Alexander Fleming discovered …

The Internet of Things Needs a Code of Ethics

Technology is evolving faster than the legal and moral frameworks needed to manage it.<p>In October, when malware called Mirai took over poorly secured webcams and DVRs, and used them to disrupt internet access across the United States, I wondered who was responsible. Not who actually coded the …

Why Fruit Has a Fake Wax Coating

For centuries, artificial protective coatings have preserved and protected foods—and made them look more appealing. An Object Lesson.<p>Anyone who’s ever been apple-picking knows the difference between food off the branch and food off the shelf: A freshly picked apple is matte with dust. It can be …

The Fear of Feelings at Work

The psychologist Susan David argues that the idea that employees should only display positive emotions at work often results in organizational failures.<p>It’s clear which emotions are acceptable at work: Happiness and enthusiasm are welcomed, but sadness and fear are usually awkward and taboo. That’s …

Celebrate Hubble's Birthday by Tearfully Reviewing Its Best Photos

For so many nerds, the Hubble space telescope feels more like a friend than a hunk of metal in the cold vacuum of space—a friend whose job you’re …

Astronomy

An Extremely Rare Copy Of The Declaration of Independence Just Turned Up In England

“There is only one copy of the engrossed and signed Declaration of Independence, in the National Archives in Washington, D.C.,” Harvard University’s …