Tami Gardner

74 Flips | 2 Magazines | 10 Likes | 7 Following | 15 Followers | @movies1939 | Keep up with Tami Gardner on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Tami Gardner”

Photography & Travel Product Reviews

48 epic dream hotels to visit before you die

Built in the shell of a 1920s structure overlooking Milan’s golden square and the Milan Cathedral, the Boscolo Milano combines colorful avant-garde …

48 epic dream hotels to visit before you die

A GOOD HOTEL CAN MAKE or break a trip. The worst hotel in the best place is still going to make retiring after a long day an unfortunate experience. …

How the Candy Industry Manipulated Daylight Saving Time

<i>“Lives are shaped by chance encounters and by discovering things that we don’t know that we don’t know,”</i> a wise woman wrote; more than that, the discovery itself is one of life’s great rewards and pleasures. Since 2010, <b>Dan Lewis</b>, director of new media communications at <i>Sesame Workshop</i>, has been …

Naomi Wolf’s Spectacular, No-Bullshit Letter of Advice to Her Younger Self

<b>Naomi Wolf</b> was only twenty-six when she began writing the cult-classic <i>The Beauty Myth: How Images of Beauty Are Used Against Women</i>, which went on to become a bestseller that shaped the cultural narrative on beauty and identity. Confronted with her sudden success, Wolf had to face the demon of “Fear …

Before I Die: A Global Ethnography of Anonymous Aspirations in Chalk and Public Space

In early 2011, artist, designer, and TED Fellow Candy Chang, queen of thoughtful installations in public spaces that invite collaborative storytelling, covered an abandoned house in her New Orleans neighborhood in chalkboard paint and stenciled on it a grid of the deceptively simple unfinished …

The Story Behind the Iconic “Migrant Mother” Photograph and How Dorothea Lange Almost Didn’t Take It

At the same time that pioneering photographer Berenice Abbott was busy capturing the urban fabric and trailblazing anthropologist Margaret Mead was laying the groundwork for modern anthropology, <b>Dorothea Lange</b> mastered the intersection of the two in her influential Depression-era photojournalism and …

The Perils of Plans: Why Creativity Requires Leaping into the Unknown

<i>“Allow yourself the uncomfortable luxury of changing your mind,”</i> I offered in one of my 7 lessons from 7 years of <i>Brain Pickings</i>. Indeed, nothing stunts growth more powerfully than our attachment to the familiar, our blind adherence to predetermined plans, and our inability to, as Rilke famously put …

Kurt Vonnegut’s Life-Advice to His Children

<b>Kurt Vonnegut</b> (November 11, 1922–April 11, 2007) endures as one of modern history’s most beloved authors, a wiseman of storytelling and a shaman of style. He was also, however, one great dad: In <b>Kurt Vonnegut: Letters</b> (<i>public library</i>) — which also gave us the author’s priceless daily routine, his …

How to Be a Writer: Hemingway’s Advice to Aspiring Authors

<b>Ernest Hemingway</b> (July 21, 1899–July 2, 1961) has contributed a great deal to the collected advice of great writers, from his famous admonition against the dangers of ego to his short and stellar Nobel Prize acceptance speech. But some of his finest wisdom springs to life in a 1935 <i>Esquire</i> piece …

The Love Letters of Pioneering Victorian Photojournalist Fannie Benjamin Johnston

Pioneering photographer Frances “Fannie” Benjamin Johnston (January 15, 1864–May 16, 1952) received her first camera as a gift from Eastman Kodak founder George Eastman and used it to usher in a new era of photojournalism. Beginning with portraits of family and friends, she was soon recognized as a …

Stay: The Social Contagion of Suicide and How to Preempt It

If you’ve ever known someone who committed suicide, or have contemplated it yourself, or have admired a personal hero who died by his or her own hand, please oh please read this. Because, as <b>Jennifer Michael Hecht</b> so stirringly argues in <b>Stay: A History of Suicide and the Philosophies Against It</b></i> …

Charles Dickens’s Heartening Fan Mail to George Eliot

To avoid the Victorian era’s biases against women writers, Mary Ann Evans (November 22, 1819–December 22, 1880) began writing under the male pseudonym George Eliot, which went on to become one of the most revered names in literary history. Her first big break came at the age of 37, in 1857, when …

Mysterious Street Photographer Vivian Maier’s Self-Portraits

In 2007, 26-year-old amateur historian and collector <b>John Maloof</b> wandered into the auction house across from his home and won, for $380, a box of 30,000 extraordinary negatives by an unknown artist whose street photographs of mid-century Chicago and New York rivaled those of Berenice Abbott and …

The Psychology of Self-Control

Ever since psychology godfather William James first expounded the crucial role of habit in how we live and who we become, modern psychology has sought to figure out how we can rewire our bad habits, maximize our willpower, and use habits to optimize our productivity. And yet, if the market for …

Scientists and Writers Answer Children’s Simple, Surprisingly Profound Questions About How Life Works

In 2012, I wrote about a lovely book titled <i>Big Questions from Little People & Simple Answers from Great Minds</i>, in which some of today’s greatest scientists, writers, and philosophers answer kids’ most urgent questions, deceptively simple yet profound. It went on to become one of the year’s best …

Einstein on Why We Are Alive

Given my soft spot for big thinkers’ answers to young people’s questions about life, I was thrilled when reader Dave Anderson shared the story of his mother’s exchange with none other than Albert Einstein. When Marion Block Anderson, an altogether exceptional woman, was a freshman at Oberlin …

How Should We Live: History’s Forgotten Wisdom on Love, Time, Family, Empathy, and Other Aspects of the Art of Living

<i>“He who cannot draw on three thousand years is living from hand to mouth,”</i> Goethe famously proclaimed. Thomas Hobbes extolled <i>“the principal and proper work of history being to instruct, and enable men by the knowledge of actions past to bear themselves prudently in the present and providently in</i> …

Young vs. Old, Male vs. Female, Intuition vs. Intellect: Susan Sontag on How the Stereotypes and Polarities of Culture Imprison Us

<i>“Identity is something that you are constantly earning,”</i> Joss Whedon observed in his fantastic Wesleyan commencement address on our inner contradictions, adding: <i>“It is a process that you must be active in.”</i> But ours is a culture that prefers to make our identities static and confine them to …

J.R.R. Tolkien on Fairy Tales, Language, the Psychology of Fantasy, and Why There’s No Such Thing as Writing “For Children”

<i>“I do not believe that I have ever written a children’s book,”</i> the great Maurice Sendak once said in an interview. <i>“I don’t write for children,”</i> he told Colbert. <i>“I write — and somebody says, ‘That’s for children!’”</i> This sentiment — the idea that designating certain types of literature as …

George Orwell, Feminist: The Beloved Author on Gender Equality in Work and Housework

Besides his great wisdom on why writers write and how to make the perfect cup of tea, <b>George Orwell</b> (June 25, 1903–January 21, 1950) also endures as a kind of cultural oracle who presaged the NSA era in <i>1984</i> and the Occupy era in <i>Animal Farm</i>. But it turns out he might have also presaged the <i>Lean In</i> era …

Otto: The Autobiography of a Teddy Bear

One of the most persistent critiques of Western children’s literature has always been its lack of diversity, and one of the most powerful yet little-known counterpoints to that critique is <b>Otto: The Autobiography of a Teddy Bear</b> (<i>public library</i>) by the great <b>Tomi Ungerer</b>, originally published in …

Kurt Vonnegut on the Writer’s Responsibility, the Limitations of the Brain, and Why the Universe Exists: A Rare 1974 WNYC Interview

<b>Kurt Vonnegut</b> endures not only as one of the most beloved writers of the past century, but also as a kind of modern sage, with wisdom ranging from his insight on the shapes of stories to his 8 rules for writing with style to his life-advice to his children. In June of 1974, <b>Walter James Miller</b>, host …

The Love Letters of Allen Ginsberg and Peter Orlovsky, with a Cameo by William S. Burroughs

Among humanity’s greatest art-forms is the love letter. From the wonderful 1998 anthology <b>My Dear Boy: Gay Love Letters Through the Centuries</b> (<i>public library</i>) — a diverse collection of missives covering the universalities of romantic love, from longing and infatuation to jealousy and rejection to …

Cats, Dogs, and the Human Condition: The Year’s Best Books about Pets and Animals

After the year’s best books in psychology and philosophy, art and design, history and biography, science and technology, and “children’s” (though we all know what that means), the season’s subjective selection of best-of reading lists continue with the year’s loveliest reads about our fellow …

Famous Writers’ Sleep Habits vs. Literary Productivity, Visualized

The early bird gets the Pulitzer … sort of.<p><i>“In both writing and sleeping,”</i> Stephen King observed in his excellent meditation on the art of “creative sleep” and wakeful dreaming, <i>“we learn to be physically still at the same time we are encouraging our minds to unlock from the humdrum rational</i> …

Why New York City Is Known as “The Big Apple”

How come New York City is nicknamed “The Big Apple”? That’s precisely what ten-year-old Ellen wonders in <b>Does My Goldfish Know Who I Am?</b> (<i>public library</i>) — that magnificent compendium of big thinkers’ answers to little kids’ questions about how life works, also among the best children’s books and …

Dustin Hoffman on What It’s Really Like to Be a Woman

Susan Sontag argued that the male-female polarization is among our culture’s most imprisoning stereotypes. Much has been said about how to be a woman and the problem of “women writers” and even how a woman is not to ride a bicycle, but what does it really mean to be male or female — not to <i>look</i> like …

Where You Are: Cartography as Wayfinding for the Soul

Humanity has had a long and obsessive relationship with maps as sensemaking tools serving such diverse purposes as propaganda, imaginative interpretation, emotional memory, and timekeeping. Far from the precise navigational tools they once were, maps have now blossomed into masterworks of artful …