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How a genetic researcher tweeted life into the lab-leak theory

Alina Chan tends to point out things that Chinese researchers didn’t do or say, important facts they did not quickly reveal, the infected market animal they never found, or a database that’s no longer online. She’s plainly suggesting there is a cover-up—and, therefore, a plot to conceal the truth.

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How a genetic researcher tweeted life into the lab-leak theory
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    Meet Alina Chan

    The postdoc who stirred up the lab-leak theory online just wants “to stay alive and not get hacked. “My goal has been achieved,” says Alina Chan, after Biden orders an investigation into how the pandemic started in China. The accusation is that covid-19 spilled from a petri dish and is being covered up. “If I am wrong, I have done something terrible,” says Chan.

    They called it a conspiracy theory. But Alina Chan tweeted life into the idea that the virus came from a lab.

    They called it a conspiracy theory. But Alina Chan tweeted life into the idea that the virus came from a lab.

    She plans to change her name and disappear, but only after a book deal.

    More about the lab-leak theory

    Technology Review has been reporting on the lab-leak theory for months. Take a look at some of our previous coverage.

    Did the coronavirus leak from a lab? These scientists say we shouldn’t rule it out.

    Did the coronavirus leak from a lab? These scientists say we shouldn’t rule it out.

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