Mindie Wehner Parker

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First sex-determing genes appeared 180 million years ago

The Y chromosome, which distinguishes males from females at the genetic level, appeared some 180 million years ago, according to a new study …

Genetics

White matter might matter much more than we thought

Look up ‘myelin’ in any neuroscience textbook and you’ll find something along these lines: It is a fatty substance that forms a sheath around axons, and gives the fibre bundles their white appearance when viewed under the microscope. The myelin sheath insulates the fibres, and helps them to carry …

Neuroscientists discover brain circuits involved in emotion

Neuroscientists have discovered a brain pathway that underlies the emotional behaviours critical for survival.<p>New research by the University of …

3D-printed cast concept uses ultrasound to heal broken bones

Last year, Victoria University of Wellington graduate Jake Evill created the Cortex cast, a concept that sought to potentially replace traditional plaster casts while also offering the added benefit of being lightweight and odor-free. Now, the Osteoid cast, a new concept designed by Deniz …

Scientists discover brain's anti-distraction system

"Our results show clearly that this is only one part of the equation and that active suppression of the irrelevant objects is another important part."<p>…

Sense of smell gets ‘wired’ early in life

The wiring of the olfactory system, which controls the sense of smell, gets set up shortly after birth and then remains stable but adaptable.<p>To …

Irregular Periods Linked With Higher Risk Of Dying From Ovarian Cancer

By Rachael Rettner, Senior Writer<p>Published: 04/10/2014 03:02 PM EDT on LiveScience<p>SAN DIEGO — Women whose menstrual periods are irregular, such as those who go more than five weeks between periods, may be at increased risk of dying from ovarian cancer, a new study suggests.<p>In the study, women with …

Scientists grow viable vaginas from girls' own cells

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Four young women born with abnormal or missing vaginas were implanted with lab-grown versions made from their own cells, the latest success in creating replacement organs that have so far included tracheas, bladders and urethras.<p>Yuanyuan Zhang, M.D., Ph.D, assistant professor at …

Gut-Eating Amoeba Caught On Film

Most of us have heard of the brain-eating amoeba. You know, the little guy that crops up in neti pots and backyard swimming holes every now and then.<p>Now let me introduce you to its cousin: the gut-eating amoeba.<p>This nasty critter can wreak havoc in your intestinal tract and cause a dreadful case of …

Simple Blood Test To Spot Early Lung Cancer Getting Closer

One of these days, there could well be a simple blood test that can help diagnose and track cancers. We aren't there yet, but a burst of research in this area shows we are getting a lot closer.<p>In the latest of these studies, scientists have used blood samples to identify people with lung cancer.<p>At …

Neurosurgeons successfully implant 3D printed skull

A 22-year-old woman from the Netherlands who suffers from a chronic bone disorder -- which has increased the thickness of her skull from 1.5cm to …

Can stem cells make old muscles strong again?

Skeletal muscles are some of the most important muscles in the body, supporting functions such as sitting, standing, blinking, and swallowing. As …

An ultra tiny sensor could help doctors clean out your arteries

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States, and according to the CDC, clogged arteries from coronary heart disease kill more than 385,000 people annually. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a tiny device they hope will …

Families hope 'Frankenstein science' lobby will not stop gene cure for mitochondrial disease

Deniz Safak was five years old when he first displayed symptoms of the disease that would later take his life. "He started being sick and had intense, stroke-like seizures," his mother, Ruth, recalled.<p>Doctors were baffled by the boy's condition and it took months before a diagnosis was made. Ruth …