Charlotte Ferris

94 Flips | 7 Magazines | 7 Likes | 6 Following | 27 Followers | @meChar | Perplexed:Immixed w/ the whole inconstant ball of wax. Why I keep reading...

Best crime fiction books for 2015

<b>A guide to the best crime fiction of 2015. Updated monthly</b><p>I Came to Find a Girl by Jaq Hazell<p>This is an unusual thriller set on the fringes of the modern art world that is dark, haunting, twisted - and, in its own way, unforgettable. It centres on Mia, an art student in Nottingham, who gets seduced …

Books

Apollo 14 astronaut claims peace-loving aliens prevented 'nuclear war' on Earth

From “The Day the Earth Stood Still” to “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” to “E.T.,” pop culture is filled with stories about friendly, curious extraterrestrials visiting Earth to learn more about mankind. For Apollo 14 veteran Edgar Mitchell that plotline is less fiction than it is reality. The …

Is Our Universe a Fake?

<i>Robert Lawrence Kuhn is the creator, writer and host of "Closer to Truth," a public television and multimedia program that features the world's</i> …

Scientists Discover Farthest Galaxy From Earth Ever Recorded

Scientists have just found a galaxy so far away from Earth that it offers a glimpse back in time to the Big Bang.<p>The galaxy, discovered at the W. M. …

7 'alien sightings' for World UFO Day

Are we alone? Not according to those who celebrate World UFO Day.<p>Each year on July 2 extraterrestrial enthusiasts around the globe celebrate unidentified flying objects and the possibility of life outside planet Earth.<p>USA TODAY Network looks back at some of the most buzzed-about sightings of …

This cognitive bias explains why we constantly misunderstand other people

For example: Your coworker turns in a project late, and you assume he's a slacker. The next week, you turn in a project late, and you tell yourself it's because you were preoccupied with relationship issues.<p>Psychologists call this phenomenon the "fundamental attribution error" or the …

Why are the majority of Alzheimer’s patients women?

Nearly two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer's disease are women, and now some scientists are questioning the long-held assumption that it's just because they tend to live longer than men.<p>What else may put woman at extra risk? Could it be genetics? Biological differences in how women age? Maybe …

Looking deeply into the universe in 3-D

The MUSE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope has given astronomers the best ever three-dimensional view of the deep Universe. After staring at …

Scientists discover lizard that changes sex in the sun

A lizard that can change its sex in the sun has been found in Australia<p>A lizard that changes sex in the sun has been discovered by scientists.<p>It is the first time the phenomenon has been seen in reptiles in the wild and could have implications for other animal species because of climate change.<p>The …

Brilliant USC commencement speech on Leonard Cohen, turning off tech, and potato chips

This year noted author and intellect Pico Iyer gave USC's commencement address. It's a great 17 minutes for graduating college students and anyone …

This Is How Uber Takes Over a City

Charlie Hales, the mayor of Portland, Ore., was running a zoning hearing last December when he missed a call on his cell from David Plouffe, the …

Irvine Welsh: 'I was a heroin addict – then I found buy-to-let'

Fame and Fortune: Author Irvine Welsh has first-hand experience of the drug addiction and poverty his gritty novels often deal with. He describes how a bus crash and the Eighties property boom may have saved his life<p>Irvine Welsh, 56, found fame in 1993 when his debut novel, <i>Trainspotting</i>, became a …

Is Texas the Center of the Universe? Neil deGrasse Tyson Says Yes, In a Way

Neil deGrasse Tyson may be the biggest celebrity astrophysicist working today. In addition to hosting the reboot of the TV series “Cosmos,” he is …

Neil deGrasse Tyson

These Circus Elephants Were Reunited 25 years Later At An Elephant Sanctuary. Their Story Is Moving

How Canadian Writers Changed The New Yorker

“It’s hard not to dream of seeing one’s self in the same font as John Cheever and Alice Munro,” Rivka Galchen recently said in an email from her …

Censorship and Salesmanship at America’s Biggest Book Fair

One evening last week, a group of writers, including Paul Auster, A. M. Homes, Jonathan Franzen, Ha Jin, Francine Prose, and Murong Xuecun, gathered on the steps of the New York Public Library to denounce censorship in China. Franzen read aloud a letter written by the Uighur scholar Ilham Tohti, …

God, Jesus and the Bible: FAQs for Gay Pride Month

June is Gay Pride Month. It is a time for parades and for festivals, for rainbow flags and for dance tents. It is a time to recognize the amazing progress that has been made on LGBT equality as we recommit ourselves to continuing the struggle until liberty and justice for all really means "all." …

“It’s making us feel like the opposition is evil”: How cable news hurts democracy — and how to fix it

TV like Fox News is entertaining, but it’s making us hate politics — and each other, UPenn professor tells Salon<p>Have you seen this video before? It’s a clip from a Wednesday-night episode of CNN’s “The Lead with Jake Tapper.” It features the eponymous anchor — playing the role of dogged, …

Hubble in Pictures: Astronomers' Top Picks (Photos)

Hubble Images<p>Credit: NASA, ESA/Hubble and the Hubble Heritage Team<p><i>This articles was originally published on The Conversation. The publication</i> …

Photograph: Katherine Anne Rose for the Observer<p>Fitness trackers might reveal more than their users want.<p>276<p>http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2015/5/15/1431700534356/6634ec75-c892-4a97-b4a8-fda721bef342-460x276.jpeg<p>460<p>Photograph: Katherine Anne Rose for the Observer<p>Fitness …

Privacy

A History of Reading

In 1996, essayist and editor Alberto Manguel produced a 22-chapter literary adventure solely exploring the act of reading. His passion for turning the pages was met with clever anecdotes and well-researched information, all uniting to form "A History of Reading," a beloved book on the power of …

The publisher’s year: hits and misses of 2014

<b>Paul Baggaley Publisher, Picador</b><p><b>The book that made my year:</b> The commercial publication of Picador’s year was <i>The Miniaturist</i> by Jessie Burton, which has just been crowned Waterstones book of the year and was a Sunday Times No 1 bestseller. It is a magical novel that effortlessly transports the …

This Week’s Hot Reads: December 22, 2014

This week, from murder in Mississippi to the pawn shops of Appalachia.<p><i>God’ll Cut You Down</i><b>by John Safran</b><p>In 2010, the career of Mississippi white …

3 Captivating Novels For A Long Winter Weekend

<i>Because the weather outside is frightful, and an engrossing, fast-paced novel is so delightful...</i><p>By Stephanie Klose<p><b>The Thriller So Engrossing, You'll Pray For Snow</b><p><b>The Girl on the Train</b><p>By Paula Hawkins<p>336 pages; Riverhead Hardcover<p>Send in the blizzards, because nothing as mundane as work, school or …

Bleak Books to Read in January

January is bleak. Cold. Dark. Depressing. Gone are the merry, or mandatory, festivities around fireplaces; the warm glow of either love or alcohol has crystallized into the hard-eyed stare of a sober new year. Embrace it. Here is the time to look inward. Reflect. Drink cocoa and organize the apps …

12 Fiction Books That Will Shape Your Theology

When we think about the role of reading in our spiritual formation, we generally think of non-fiction books that help us understand scripture and …