Maura Dartley-Rocco

23 Flips | 2 Magazines | 1 Like | 1 Following | @mdr336 | Keep up with Maura Dartley-Rocco on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Maura Dartley-Rocco”

kenya articles on News24

PICS: Kenyan farmers toast growing demand European demand for avocados<p>It may be loved and derided as the go-to millennial brunch, but avocado toast …

Africa

Smokers lack motivation, feel more tired and are less physically active than non-smokers, new study reveals

While the results of smoking may be expected to decrease fitness, new research, published in <i>Respirology</i>, has found that smokers are less physically …

The lesson of the 'Marlboro Man'

At least four former Marlboro Men, those rugged actors of the famous ad campaign, have died of smoking-related disease. The latest was Eric Lawson, who had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease caused by a three-pack-a-day habit. Lawson, the face of what became the best-selling brand of cigarettes, …

Eight Businesses Busted Selling Tobacco To Minors

Over the last few months, Council Bluffs police officers with the PAR unit checked 71 businesses to see if they sell tobacco to minors.<p>Of the 71 …

Selling

FDA aims to prevent smoking among 10 million U.S. youth

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration initiated its first public health education campaign to prevent teens from starting smoking, officials say.

Don't blame Fifty Shades of Grey, the over-40s need sex education

New figures show a rise in sexually transmitted diseases in the over-35s and Fifty Shades of Grey is being blamed. With the number of teen pregnancies dropping, could it actually be that the older folk are need of some serious sex education, asks Dr Brooke Magnanti.<p>When in doubt, blame E L …

World Health Day isn't all about hand-washing and healthy eating

Tomorrow - April 7th - is World Health Day. This is a day that marks the founding of the World Health Organisation but, perhaps more importantly, is a day that draws worldwide attention to the importance of good health - and this does not just mean the personal health of individuals but also that …

Better-Educated Parent Leads To More Nutritious Children

<b>Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online</b><p>Researchers wrote in the journal <i>Public Health Nutrition</i> that the more educated the parent, the …

University of Illinois

Report: Healthy students are better students

Children who are physically active and well-nourished have better memory and perform more efficiently on standardized exams than students who do not …

A Sip of Soda: How Soft Drinks Impact Your Health See image larger here: http://bit.ly/YhUy7b

Anorexia Nervosa Affects Your Whole Body In Honor of National Eating Disorder Awareness Week Image from womenshealth.gov

Is your handbag going to give you arthritis? Not to mention slipped discs and bad knees? How lugging around a heavy load can put years on your body! By LAURA TOPHAM Studies show half of women suffer pain from carrying heavy handbags — and now men are also suffering, according to new research by the British Chiropractic Association. ‘Heavy man-bags — weighing, on average, 6.2kg — put unbalanced strain and stress on the body, which can lead to pain, poor posture and health problems,’ says Rishi Loatey, of the British Chiropractic Association. ‘I’ve noticed a spike in patients experiencing pain in the neck and upper back due to carrying around heavy loads more frequently,’ he adds. There, my movements while walking were recorded and analysed — both with and without my weighty 9lb-plus handbag — to see the effects. The results were startling. ‘Carrying a bag has a huge impact on posture and movement,’ says Bupa physiotherapist Russell Stocker. ‘Though you might not notice it, your body dramatically adapts and compensates. This was even more pronounced when wearing high heels.’ NECK When you carry a bag, your neck naturally leans away from the load to help carry and balance the weight. This causes tension on the carrying side of the neck and compression on the opposite side. ‘Craning your neck means increasing the distance between the neck and the shoulder,’ says Russell. The problem is that this is just where a bundle of nerves come together (forming the brachial plexus) before running into the arm; the strain can lead to neck pain and muscle inflammation. Over time, this could trigger an ‘acute episode’, he says — the muscles can spasm, restricting movement and causing pain. SHOULDERS AND BACK The shoulder bearing the load is rotated backwards and raised all the time, explains Russell. This affects the muscles running down the upper back, the shoulder blades and those supporting the spine — they tire and spasm. As Bupa orthopaedic physician Dr Leon Creaney, explains: ‘Fatigued muscles won’t hold the spine correctly, so it will slip into poor posture — slumped with curved back and shoulders.’ Long term, this can lead to painful arthritis in the facet joints. These are tiny joints running all the way along the spine on either side The vertebrae and the discs — the ‘cushions’ of cartilage that sit between the vertebrae — could also be affected. "The side of the body not carrying the bag leans away from it, crunching the lower back on this side, while extending it further on the other,’ adds Russell. This compresses the vertebrae, wearing them down. Carrying a heavy bag can, over time, also cause disc degeneration and prolapse, says Dr Creaney. This is when the soft tissue inside the disc ruptures out of it, pressing on the nerves. ‘This can be agonising, and even require surgery’ he explains — ‘and carrying a heavy bag could lead to faster disc degeneration. ‘Bearing a heavy load on one side could also cause the spinal nerves to become irritated or compressed — possibly leading to sciatica (pain in the buttock and thigh), which is also very painful.’ ARMS The arm carrying the bag remains very static while walking to keep the load still and balanced. ‘This is quite different to the natural swinging movement we make when walking,’ says Russell. ‘Without the normal arm swing used as a balance mechanism, this can make you slightly unsteady and actually mean you need greater effort to move forwards.’ The nerves in the arms can also become irritated by the pressure of the bag, leading to chronic pain. HIPS AND LEGS In the long term, women can develop arthritis from increased pressure. ‘Carrying a bag makes you walk differently, and that changes the way forces act through the skeletal system, which could cause problems and pain,’ says Russell. The greater the load of the bag, the more pressure on the leg joints. Over a long period, force on the knees can cause wear and tear and joint problems. ‘With a heavy bag you also take shorter steps — an adaptation your body probably makes to control the load better and remain upright,’ he adds. First Seen Here: http://bit.ly/UH4chL

How Hugging, Kissing And More Displays Of Affection Help Your Health! Good news, lovebirds! If you're planning to celebrate with your Valentine in the coming weeks, get ready to toast to your health. Earlier this week, a researcher at the Medical University of Vienna spread some good news in honor of National Hug Day. He pointed out that hugging someone you care about can ease stress and anxiety, lower blood pressure and even boost memory -- but hugging a stranger can have the opposite effect. While the association between hugging and your health isn't new, it's especially relevant this time of year -- with Valentine's Day on the horizon and many couples hurrying to cuddle away the frigid temperatures sweeping across much of the nation. Experts believe it all comes back to the hormone oxytocin. A simple embrace seems to increase levels of the "love hormone," which has been linked to social bonding. That oxytocin boost seems to have a greater calming effect on women than men, the BBC reported. In one study, the stress-reducing effects of a brief hug in the morning carried throughout a tough work day, USA Today reported. Perhaps the best news of all is that hugging isn't the only way getting close to your Valentine can boost your health. A few others also have big benefits: Cuddling Call it an extended hug -- cuddling also releases stress-easing oxytocin, which can reduce blood pressure and bond you with your mate. But you may not have guessed that a little cuddle time can help you and your partner communicate better. "Non-verbal communication can be a very powerful way to say to your partner, 'I get you,'" marriage and family therapist David Klow told Shape magazine. "Cuddling is a way of saying, 'I know how you feel.' It allows us to feel known by our partner in ways that words can't convey." Talking Speaking of communication -- even just spending time together without touching can put you at ease and lower blood pressure, compared to spending time with someone less significant, according to the BBC. Not to mention that making the effort to communicate openly can only strengthen your relationship. Kissing Of course, kissing has also been shown to affect oxytocin and cortisol levels, and, just like hugging and cuddling, can reduce stress. But one of the more surprising pros of puckering up is a cleaner kisser. The increase in saliva production that comes along with a smooch can wash bacteria off teeth and help fight plaque buildup. Sex In addition to relaxing you and burning some calories, some time between the sheets can help you fight off germs (Hello, flu protection!). As long as your partner isn't already sick, a couple of sexy escapades a week can boost a particular antibody that fights off colds, according to a 1999 study. Sex may also promote better sleep, thanks to both the relaxing effects of that oxytocin and an increase in a hormone called prolactin, which is normally higher during sleep, according to Women's Health. Original Article with Links to Studies: http://huff.to/Vi1Evk

Health Effects of Energy Drinks on Children, Adolescents & Young Adults - According to a research study by the American Academy of Pediatrics Full Study Here: http://1.usa.gov/Y9iUj6

What is PMS? By Discovery Health Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) is a set of hormonal changes that trigger a wide range of physical and emotional symptoms in women. These symptoms can range from anger and irritability, to abdominal cramping and breast tenderness, to food cravings. PMS generally occurs between 7 to 14 days before menstruation (a woman's monthly bleeding, or "period") and then stops once menstruation begins. It can only occur during a woman's childbearing years -- after menopause, it stops. Up to 40 percent of menstruating women experience symptoms of PMS [ref]. In most of these women, PMS is nothing more than an annoyance. But in about 5 percent of women, the symptoms are debilitating enough to interfere with daily life. PMS Symptoms There are more than 150 different symptoms associated with PMS, so it is often difficult to diagnose. Although there is no real test for PMS, doctors will do tests to rule out other conditions that cause similar symptoms. When a woman's symptoms coincide with her menstrual cycle, and she tests negative for other conditions, PMS is usually determined to be the cause of her symptoms. Keeping a monthly diary of symptoms is helpful to confirm the diagnosis. Some conditions to rule out when diagnosing PMS: Anemia Eating disorders Diabetes Alcohol abuse Hypothyroidism Oral contraceptive side effects Perimenopause Dysmenorrhea Chronic fatigue syndrome Endometriosis Autoimmune disorders There are more than 150 physical and psychological symptoms associated with PMS. These symptoms can vary from mild to severe, from person to person and from cycle to cycle. General PMS symptoms include: - Psychological symptoms - Mood changes (e.g., crying for no reason, depression, anxiety, anger, sadness or irritability) - Changes in mental functioning (inability to concentrate or remember) Changes in sex drive (increased or decreased libido) Physical symptoms - Upset stomach, diarrhea or constipation - Fatigue - Difficulty sleeping - Headache - Fluid retention/bloating - Acne - Breast tenderness - Joint or muscle pain - Cramping - Food cravings (especially for carbohydrates, chocolate and other sweets) - Weight gain What Causes PMS? Scientists don't know exactly why women get PMS or why some women experience it more severely than others. But they believe that it stems from a combination of hormonal changes, genetics, nutrition and psychological factors. The Menstrual Cycle Hormones are one of the most studied aspects of PMS's origins. PMS occurs near the end of a woman's menstrual cycle, within seven to 14 days before menstruation. During this cycle, which takes about 28 days, an egg matures and is released from the ovaries for possible fertilization. The hormones estrogen and progesterone play a big part in the menstrual cycle. At around five days into the menstrual cycle, the ovaries release the female hormone estrogen. This hormone helps thicken the uterus, which will nourish an embryo if conception occurs. At around 14 days into the cycle, the egg is released in a process called ovulation. After ovulation, the last (luteal) phase of the menstrual cycle begins, and PMS symptoms tend to emerge. During this phase, the ovaries increase production of estrogen and begin producing progesterone to prepare the uterus for a possible pregnancy. If the egg is not fertilized, production of estrogen and progesterone drops. This hormonal drop causes the lining of the uterus to die and slough off, leading to menstruation. Once menstruation starts, PMS symptoms stop with a day or two. Researchers believe that the hormones estrogen and progesterone interact with certain brain chemicals, called neurotransmitters, and that this interaction can affect mood and contribute to other PMS symptoms. Let's take a look at some of the specific neurotransmitters researchers believe are involved in PMS. Hormones and Neurotransmitters Researchers believe that the following neurotransmitters are affected by estrogen and/or progesterone during the menstrual cycle and may lead to some of the symptoms of PMS: Serotonin regulates mood and sleep patterns and creates feelings of well-being. Reduced levels of estrogen during the luteal phase may be linked to a drop in serotonin. Lower serotonin levels are associated with depression, irritability, anger and carbohydrate cravings, all of which are symptoms of PMS. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a neurotransmitter associated with anxiety and depression. Progesterone may increase the activity of this neurotransmitter. Endorphins increase feelings of pleasure and reduce the intensity of pain. Both estrogen and progesterone may affect endorphin levels. Norepinephrine and epinephrine are neurotransmitters involved in the body's stress response. Estrogen may affect the levels of these neurotransmitters, which can influence blood pressure and heart rate as well as mood. Whether symptoms are influenced by increased or decreased levels of estrogen and progesterone is a matter of some debate. Studies routinely produce conflicting results. Some researchers believe that the key to PMS symptoms lies in the balance between these two hormones during the menstrual cycle. Diet and PMS We don't know exactly how diet impacts PMS. But some research has shown that increasing complex carbohydrates before menstruation helps increase the levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin, a deficiency of which has been linked to PMS-related depression. Although complex carbohydrates (such as those found in whole grains and vegetables) are good to eat during PMS, simple carbohydrates (such as those found in sugary snacks and white bread) can actually increase water retention, irritability and other PMS symptoms. Experts also recommend that menstruating women take vitamins, especially a daily multivitamin containing folic acid (which is essential for the growth of the fetus should conception occur) and a calcium supplement with vitamin D (which helps bones stay strong and may also help alleviate PMS symptoms). Some researchers think Vitamin B6 may ease symptoms, particularly depression, but its effectiveness has not been clinically proven, and very high doses (500 mg to 2,000 mg daily) can cause nerve damage. Dieticians sometimes recommend that women who are experiencing PMS eat several small meals throughout the day rather than three big meals. Eating a lot of food at once can cause blood sugar to swing up and down, which some people believe might exacerbate PMS symptoms. Experts say that certain foods should be avoided: Caffeine, because it can increase irritability, nervousness and insomnia Alcohol, because it can act as a depressant Salt, because it can increase water retention and bloating Women should also avoid nicotine because, in addition to its other health risks, it can affect PMS symptoms much like caffeine. A 2005 study found that women who ate a diet rich in vitamin D and calcium had less of a risk of developing PMS than women who didn't eat these nutrients. To see a benefit, the women in the study had to eat at least 1,200 milligrams of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D each day. Researchers don't know exactly why vitamin D and calcium warded off PMS symptoms, but they say it may have something to do with calcium's effect on the hormone estrogen during the menstrual cycle. Full infographic from I Heart Guts :http://bit.ly/WpSLkk

From Nuisance to Asset: Promoting 21st Century Skills with Smart Phones

Anyone working with middle school and high school youth has been frustrated at one time or another with excessive cell phone use during programming. …

Smartphones In The Classroom: Working Smarter, Not Harder

<b>Smartphones In The Classroom: Working Smarter, Not Harder</b><p>by <b>Dawn Casey-Rowe</b>, Social Studies & Educational Technology Teacher<p>My smartphone changed my …

Education Technology

Use Smartphones in class, say school principals

The National Association of Secondary School Principals have been trying to make sense of the whirlwind that is Social and Mobile Technologies.<p>They …

Some Schools Actually Want Students To Play With Their Smartphones In Class

If there is one thing that the mobile-computing era has made clear, it's that kids love touch screens. Because those touch screens — smartphones, iPads, Kindles and the like — are an inevitable added distraction to the classroom, schools across the country are struggling to deal with the growing …