Lizette Carrazco

51 Flips | 6 Magazines | 2 Following | 4 Followers | @lizette9 | Keep up with Lizette Carrazco on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Lizette Carrazco”

Tight ankles | Feat. Kelly Starrett | MobilityWOD

Stacked Caps: Craig Capurso's Heavy-Volume Shoulder Workout

Vital Stats<p><b>Name:</b> Craig Capurso <b><br>Occupation:</b> Owner of Fire and Ice Fitness; Cellucor and Bodybuilding.com Athlete; IFBB Physique Pro <b><br>Website:</b> …

Dips Vs Close Grip Bench Press Vs Skullcrushers – Fitness Volt Bodybuilding & Fitness Magazine

It’s been a while since I’ve written a Vs post. I kind went off on a much longer than anticipated look into the factors of muscle growth in my latest …

4 Things You Need to Know About Planks

While improved strength and muscle tone are reason enough to add planks to your workout routine, this move has many other health benefits that often …

Ten Oly Truths

1. There’s no short cut<p>2. From the time you begin, you only have a certain amount of time to reach your peak<p>3. You can’t progress if you don’t recover<p>…

Kettlebell Exercise Routine | The Art of Manliness

<i>This post is brought to you by Onnit. Check out Onnit’s line of supplements and fitness gear including the Onnit Primalbell, a 36-pound kettlebell in</i> …

Deadlifts vs. Clean Pulls

<b>How Picking Stuff Up Can Be Totally Different</b><p><i>(Note from MR: This is a guest post from my good friend Wil Fleming. Wil is a very sharp guy and knows</i> …

Hips Don't Lie: They're Stronger Than You Are

by MISSY ALBRECHT, DPT, CSCS, FMS| Physical Therapist/Coach<p><b>Do your homework!</b> [Y]ou should be improving your hip extension mobility to allow your body …

Trigger Point Release For Beginners | The Art of Manliness

We can’t all afford a personal masseuse or athletic trainer to regularly rub out the kinks, soreness, and tight spots in our muscles. But there is a …

Mastering The Muscle-Up

For athletes looking to get their first muscle-up—whether on the rings or the bar—who may have tried and failed numerous times; who may have studied …

Muscle

Squat Stance the Olympic Lifts: The Snatch Clean Receiving Positions

Squat Stance & the Olympic Lifts: The Snatch & Clean Receiving Positions <br>Greg Everett<p>With the Olympic lifts, it’s easy to wander a little too far …

Help for Your Shortie Hamstrings

<b>My hamstrings and I have had a long and troubled relationship.</b> While we’re pretty happily enamored with one another these days, it wasn’t always so …

Depression 'makes us biologically older'

<b>Depression can make us physically older by speeding up the ageing process in our cells, according to a study.</b><p>Lab tests showed cells looked biologically older in people who were severely depressed or who had been in the past.<p>These visible differences in a measure of cell ageing called telomere …

Telomere

Albuquerque becomes latest abortion battlefield

ALBUQUERQUE — A high-desert city in one of the poorest states in the nation has become the abortion debate's latest battlefield and a testing ground for whether abortion limits can be imposed on the local level.<p>Early voting is underway in Albuquerque for an election Tuesday, which will decide …

A Blood Test For Alzheimer's?

8 Ways to Spice Up Oral Sex

Going down is about to get even better<p>You probably have a ton of favorite positions when it comes to sex, but what about foreplay? If your pre-sex routine is feeling, well, routine, it’s time to get creative with your mouth moves. Take a page (or eight!) out of the <i>Men’s Health and Women’s Health</i> …

your New York, NY center for back pain

The Norman Marcus Pain Institute can eliminate your pain and end your suffering<p>There is Help for You<p>You have persistent pain, probably in your back, …

Ask an Expert: All About Physical Therapy

Hi everyone! I'm Dr. Paul Kochoa. I'm a physiotherapist that specializes in the evaluation and treatment of orthopedic musculoskeletal injuries, …

Reason why you feel back pain Tag, Like and Share with Friends www.physio-therapy.cz

Low Back Pain Exercises Exercises that stretch and strengthen the muscles of your abdomen and spine can help prevent back problems. Strong back and abdominal muscles help you keep good posture, with your spine in its correct position. If your muscles are tight, take a warm shower or bath before doing the exercises. Exercise on a rug or mat. Wear loose clothing. Don’t wear shoes. Stop doing any exercise that causes pain until you have talked with your healthcare provider. These exercises are intended only as suggestions. Check with your provider before starting the exercises. Ask your provider or physical therapist to help you develop an exercise program. Ask your provider how many times a week you need to do the exercises. Caution: If you have a herniated disk or other disk problem, check with your healthcare provider before doing these exercises. Exercises Standing hamstring stretch: Put the heel of one leg on a stool about 15 inches high. Keep your leg straight. Lean forward, bending at the hips until you feel a mild stretch in the back of your thigh. Make sure you do not roll your shoulders or bend at the waist when doing this. You want to stretch your leg, not your lower back. Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat with each leg 3 times. Cat and camel: Get down on your hands and knees. Let your stomach sag, allowing your back to curve downward. Hold this position for 5 seconds. Then arch your back and hold for 5 seconds. Do 2 sets of 15. Quadruped arm and leg raise: Get down on your hands and knees. Pull in your belly button and tighten your abdominal muscles to stiffen your spine. While keeping your abdominals tight, raise one arm and the opposite leg away from you. Hold this position for 5 seconds. Lower your arm and leg slowly and change sides. Do this 10 times on each side. Pelvic tilt: Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor. Pull your belly button in towards your spine and push your lower back into the floor, flattening your back. Hold this position for 15 seconds, then relax. Repeat 5 to 10 times. Partial curl: Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor. Draw in your abdomen and tighten your stomach muscles. With your hands stretched out in front of you, curl your upper body forward until your shoulders clear the floor. Hold this position for 3 seconds. Don't hold your breath. It helps to breathe out as you lift your shoulders. Relax back to the floor. Repeat 10 times. Build to 2 sets of 15. To challenge yourself, clasp your hands behind your head and keep your elbows out to your sides. Gluteal stretch: Lie on your back with both knees bent. Rest the ankle of one leg over the knee of your other leg. Grasp the thigh of the bottom leg and pull toward your chest. You will feel a stretch along the buttocks and possibly along the outside of your hip. Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times with each leg. Extension exercise: Lie face down on the floor for 5 minutes. If this hurts too much, lie face down with a pillow under your stomach. This should relieve your leg or back pain. When you can lie on your stomach for 5 minutes without a pillow, you can continue with Part B of this exercise. After lying on your stomach for 5 minutes, prop yourself up on your elbows for another 5 minutes. If you can do this without having more leg or buttock pain, you can start doing part C of this exercise. Lie on your stomach with your hands under your shoulders. Then press down on your hands and extend your elbows while keeping your hips flat on the floor. Hold for 1 second and lower yourself to the floor. Do 3 to 5 sets of 10 repetitions. Rest for 1 minute between sets. You should have no pain in your legs when you do this, but it is normal to feel some pain in your lower back. Do this exercise several times a day. Side plank: Lie on your side with your legs, hips, and shoulders in a straight line. Prop yourself up onto your forearm so your elbow is directly under your shoulder. Lift your hips off the floor and balance on your forearm and the outside of your foot. Try to hold this position for 15 seconds, then slowly lower your hip to the ground. Switch sides and repeat. Work up to holding for 1 minute or longer. This exercise can be made easier by starting with your knees and hips flexed toward your chest. Comment, Like and Share with Friends www.physio-therapy.cz

Kneecap Bursitis Exercises You can stretch your leg right away by doing the first 3 stretching exercises. Do the other exercises to strengthen your leg. Hamstring stretch on wall: Lie on your back with your buttocks close to a doorway. Stretch your uninjured leg straight out in front of you on the floor through the doorway. Raise your injured leg and rest it against the wall next to the door frame. Keep your leg as straight as possible. You should feel a stretch in the back of your thigh. Hold this position for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times. Standing calf stretch: Stand facing a wall with your hands on the wall at about eye level. Keep your injured leg back with your heel on the floor. Keep the other leg forward with the knee bent. Turn your back foot slightly inward (as if you were pigeon-toed). Slowly lean into the wall until you feel a stretch in the back of your calf. Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Return to the starting position. Repeat 3 times. Do this exercise several times each day. Quadriceps stretch: Stand an arm's length away from the wall with your injured side farthest from the wall. Facing straight ahead, brace yourself by keeping one hand against the wall. With your other hand, grasp the ankle on your injured side and pull your heel toward your buttocks. Don't arch or twist your back. Keep your knees together. Hold this stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Quad sets: Sit on the floor with your injured leg straight and your other leg bent. Press the back of the knee of your injured leg against the floor by tightening the muscles on the top of your thigh. Hold this position 10 seconds. Relax. Do 2 sets of 15. Heel slide: Sit on a firm surface with your legs straight in front of you. Slowly slide the heel of the foot on your injured side toward your buttock by pulling your knee toward your chest as you slide the heel. Return to the starting position. Do 2 sets of 15. Straight leg raise: Lie on your back with your legs straight out in front of you. Bend the knee on your uninjured side and place the foot flat on the floor. Tighten the thigh muscle on your injured side and lift your leg about 8 inches off the floor. Keep your leg straight and your thigh muscle tight. Slowly lower your leg back down to the floor. Do 2 sets of 15. Side-lying leg lift: Lie on your uninjured side. Tighten the front thigh muscles on your injured leg and lift that leg 8 to 10 inches away from the other leg. Keep the leg straight and lower it slowly. Do 2 sets of 15. Wall squat with a ball: Stand with your back, shoulders, and head against a wall. Look straight ahead. Keep your shoulders relaxed and your feet 3 feet from the wall and shoulder's width apart. Place a soccer or basketball-sized ball behind your back. Keeping your back against the wall, slowly squat down to a 45-degree angle. Your thighs will not yet be parallel to the floor. Hold this position for 10 seconds and then slowly slide back up the wall. Repeat 10 times. Build up to 2 sets of 15. Comment, Like and Share with Friends www.physio-therapy.cz

Managing Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

Shoulder pain is a highly prevalent and quality of life-diminishing problem, affecting around 14% of adults. Rotator Cuff tendinopathy (or …

Map of our brain Comment, Like & Share www.physio-therapy.cz

Stress and our body Comment, Like & Share www.physio-therapy.cz

Scapula Stability Exercises, Challenging Current Practice : A guest article by Chris Littlewood

<b>So yet again I am pleased to give you another fantastic</b> <b>guest article, this time from Chris Littlewood a physio and a research fellow at the</b> …

Is there a relationship between subacromial impingement syndrome and scapular orientation? A systematic review

Abstract<p><b>Background</b> Alterations in scapular orientation and dynamic control, specifically involving increased anterior tilt and downward rotation, are …

Comment, Like and Share with your Friends www.physio-therapy.cz