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New Archaeology Discoveries Shed Light on Humanity's Oldest Relatives

Since the late 1800s, we've known that other types of humans once roamed our planet. At that time, scientists recognized that fossils unearthed in caves across Europe belonged to archaic humans now known as Neanderthals. Over that time, our understanding of Neanderthals has undergone dramatic upheavals.

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New Archaeology Discoveries Shed Light on Humanity's Oldest Relatives
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    'Simply did not work': Mating between Neanderthals and modern humans may have been a product of failed alliances, says archaeologist Ludovic Slimak

    'Simply did not work': Mating between Neanderthals and modern humans may have been a product of failed alliances, says archaeologist Ludovic Slimak

    "When two populations are close to one another but they are very distinct — maybe they can have a different language and different traditions, they …

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