Roy Lichtenstein

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Richard Pettibone | Roy Lichtenstein, 'Ball of Twine', 1963 (2013)

As a young painter, Richard Pettibone began replicating on a miniature scale works by newly famous artists, and later also modernist masters, signing …

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Make a Comic Book, Pop Art, Cartoon from a Photo

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Make a Comic Book, Pop Art Poster

Animated Pop Art: Roy Lichtenstein music video for the Art Institute of Chicago

Pop Artist Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein: Tokyo Brushstrokes

ROY LICHTENSTEIN: Still Lifes at Gagosian Gallery West 24th Street

Roy Lichtenstein [excerpt]

Roy Lichtenstein au Centre Georges Pompidou - Paris 2013

Roy Lichtenstein Pops into 3-D

Stefan Sagmeister has a great eye for design. He earned his reputation by making album covers for The Rolling Stones, David Byrne and Lou Reed, among others. His company Sagmeister & Walsh's latest project imagines a fashion shoot for the Lebanese department store Aishti that could have sprung from …

Tate Modern brings a guided museum tour to Twitter to highlight its Lichtenstein exhibit

The Tate Modern art museum is taking a modern approach to the gallery tour by bringing its Twitter followers along for a guided exploration. Tomorrow, the museum is giving a tweet- and image-based tour of its Roy Lichtenstein exhibit for art appreciators who otherwise wouldn't be able to visit the …

Art

Andy Warhol, Jeff Koons, and Roy Lichtenstein all created amazing BMW 'art cars'

Lichtenstein. Warhol. Koons. Stella. Calder. Rauschenberg. Holzer. Elíasson.<p>Since a BMW 3.0 CSL painted by Alexander Calder lined up for the Le Mans 24-hour race exactly 40 years ago, the BMW Art Car Collection has fascinated both art and design enthusiasts as well as car and technology fans all …

Art

You Have 38 Days to See This Lichtenstein Mural Before It’s Destroyed

The life span of an art exhibit is predictable. It opens, exists for a while, and closes. The work is curated, displayed, and packed up again—unless someone throws an arm through a painting, or the whole thing is set aflame, or it simply disappears in the dead of night as if fleeing unpaid rent.</b> …