Kok Ming Loo

9 Flips | 1 Magazine | 2 Followers | @kokmingloo | Keep up with Kok Ming Loo on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Kok Ming Loo”

Joaquin Phoenix estranged from Marvel's Doctor Strange

Joaquin Phoenix has turned down the chance to play mystical superhero Doctor Strange for Marvel Studios, according to the Hollywood Reporter.<p>The Oscar-nominated star of Gladiator, Walk the Line and The Master was in advanced negotiations for the role in July, but talks broke down for unspecified …

Menswear for autumn/winter: texture and pattern – in pictures

Autumn/winter 2014 menswear mixes rich pattern, shearling and textured knit. Layer up, ready for the journey. It’s all about the road less travelled<p>Styling by Helen Seamons Photography by Joanna van Mulder. Grooming by Gow Tanaka using Aveda. Model: Erik Andersson at FM. Retouching: Cecile Stevens …

Wakie Wakes You With Phone Calls From Strangers

There’s alarm clock apps that force you to spin around, and ones that require you to move closer to your router. Then there’s Wakie, an app that encourages random strangers around the world to wake you up with a phone call.<p>Wakie has actually existed before, as it’s the international version of the …

US (NY): Gotham Greens plans another hydroponic rooftop greenhouse

Gotham Greens, which operates a rooftop greenhouse in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, plans to create one of the largest commercial greenhouses in the country …

History of Hydroponics Aztecs were true hydroponic pioneers who grew crops on rafts woven out of reeds and roots, on the edge of lakes. When they were driven off of their land, in the 11th and 12th centuries, they settled on the shores of Lake Tenochtitlan (and others) in Mexico, where it was too marshy to grow the traditional way. So, they developed an ingenious, revolutionary way to grow crops in the water! The lake shores were stocked with mineral-rich deposits that were used to nourish the food they grew on the water. The floating rafts that they constructed where often attached together to form entire floating fields- the size of islands- on which they grew everything they needed to sustain themselves. Plant roots grew through the rafts, made of natural fibers, and dangled into the water, sucking in everything they needed from the nutritious lake water. Aztec decedents still cultivate some of these floating gardens near Mexico City today, in a long-standing tradition.