Kevin Imrie

136 Flips | 4 Magazines | 1 Like | 4 Following | @keemer | Keep up with Kevin Imrie on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Kevin Imrie”

Poetry can heal – it helped me through depression

In Dante’s time, books were sold in apothecary shops: literature as medicine. I learned this when I was very ill, during an acute episode of manic depression, and I was struck by the profound metaphor behind this commercial fact. The apothecary of literature can heal, and I would need it …

Literature

Geoffrey Hill: 'poetry should be shocking and surprising'

<b>Sometimes difficult and often very funny, Sir Geoffrey Hill – who died this week, aged 84 – was one Britain’s greatest living poets. He granted a rare audience to Sameer Rahim for this interview, first published in December 2013</b><p><b>Geoffrey Hill</b> is arguably our greatest post-war poet. Over the past 50 …

Paris Review - William Stafford, The Art of Poetry No. 67

Interviewed by William Young<p>Issue 129, Winter 1993<p>The intimacy of William Stafford’s poetry would seem to belie the enormous popularity the poet’s work has enjoyed, but in fact it is a product of Stafford’s keen ability to discern poetic language in everyday speech and appropriate it for his own …

10 Mystical Quotes by Omar Khayyam That Would Touch a Chord with Every Poetry Lover

Persian scholar Omar Khayyam donned multiple hats. He was a mathematician, an astronomer, a philosopher, but his most enduring identity has been that …

Billy Collins - Interview

Is there anything Billy Collins misses about being the U.S. poet laureate, a post he held from 2001 to 2003?<p>“Not really,” Collins says genially …

The brilliance of writing poetry on napkins

Brazilian poet Pedro Gabriel has always had his head in the clouds, simmering with ideas in a mix of words that, by a twist of fate, led him to stardom, as his books sold more than 200,000 copies. In a country where the habit of reading is not as strong and being published is something extremely …

Books

100 Must-Read Epistolary Novels from the Past and Present

There is something pleasantly, innocently voyeuristic about reading an epistolary novel. They give you the feeling of stumbling on a box of letters …

Globe poetry

It was the same life, more or less,<p>yet suddenly a flight itinerary represented<p>the most tangible indication of my fate.<p>From the air I saw mountains, forest,<p>lakes in which dissolved the notion<p>of ownership, and the sweet little Beechcraft<p>wagged its tail on landing<p>in a crosswind. My fellow …

'That's not poetry; it's sociology!' – in defence of Claudia Rankine's Citizen

At a recent reception following a poetry reading by elder, experimental poets, an academic critic – of decidedly avant-garde tastes – overheard that I had been teaching Claudia Rankine’s Citizen for the last four semesters. I knew, in fact, that this scholar’s life’s work centered around …

Literature

The Seven Types of Poetry

The simplest but least useful way to think of poetry is as two types: good or bad. Yet for those willing to look deeper, there is much to be gained from attempting to understand and appreciate the wide and varied landscape of contemporary poetry.<p>One of the mistakes of the beginning poet is to …

U.S. poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera on the art of poetry

As you might expect from a U.S. poet laureate, Juan Felipe Herrera has a way with words. When we talked to him about his appointment, he shared his ideas on the act of writing, some of his inspirations and the art of poetry.<p>Here are Herrera's thoughts, in his own words.<p><b>On the craft of poetry:</b> The …

1,200 years later, is Chinese poetry entering a new golden age?

A few weeks ago in Beijing, a dozen well-known poets got together.<p>Among them was an IT guy who wanted their help testing out a new app for a social network — not based on sharing friends, photos or business contacts, but about sharing <i>poetry</i>. He convinced them to each recite some of their …

Poetry Notebook 2006-2014 review – Clive James’s absorbing thoughts on verse

Clive James is never po-faced about poetry. He writes with the buoyant, aphoristic panache that made his career and with a judgment refined by a lifetime of reading and thinking about poetry – and writing it (he has a new collection coming out this April). This sympathetic, absorbing and …

Literature

21 Heart-Punching Quotes That Will Make You Fall In Love With Poetry

It’s no secret that I love poetry. Like, if I could wake up and eat poetry for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, I probably would. (Okay, sometimes I …

Poetry Is a Virus That Can Save the World: On Jorie Graham’s ‘From the New World’

The poet Jorie Graham was born in New York in 1950 to a sculptor and a journalist. She was raised in Italy and, later, France, where she studied at …

Paris Review - Mark Strand, The Art of Poetry No. 77

Interviewed by Wallace Shawn<p>Issue 148, Fall 1998<p>Mark Strand was born in 1934 on Prince Edward Island in Canada. His parents were from the United States. His father did many different things—you could call him a businessman—and his mother was at different times a schoolteacher and an archaeologist. …

Paris Review - Charles Olson, The Art of Poetry No. 12

Interviewed by Gerard Malanga<p>Issue 49, Summer 1970<p>I arrived at Annisquam, a village nearby Gloucester, on Sunday, April 13, about midday. I was the houseguest of the poet Gerrit Lansing whom I had met a few years previously in New York at a party given by the poet Kenward Elmslie. Early in the …

View from the Mountain

New poems by Louise Glück.<p>Louise Glück’s new volume of poetry, “Faithful and Virtuous Night,” lifts its title from a book that belongs to one of its characters:<p>At the time of which I’m speaking,<br>my brother was reading a book he called<br>the faithful and virtuous night.<br>Was this the night in which he …

Body Unlimited: The Incredible Poetry of Samuel Beckett

The Samuel Beckett we’re taught in America is solitary, dryly humorous, and existentially distressed: basically, he’s an absurdist playwright from a …

Literature

Paris Review - John Banville, The Art of Fiction No. 200

Interviewed by Belinda McKeon<p>Issue 188, Spring 2009<p>John Banville in 1998.<p>When I first arrived at his Dublin city-center apartment, John Banville was working at his writing desk. The apartment, with its neatly aligned furniture and its orderly piles of books, is not Banville’s home but his office, …

The Saturday poem: ‘Smith’

What is this fear before the unctuous teller?<br>Why does it seem to take a forger’s nerve<br>To make my signature come naturally?<br>Naturally? But every singature’s<br>A trick we learn to do, consistently,<br>Like Queequeg’s cross, or Whistler’s butterfly.<br>Perhaps some childhood spectre grips my hand<br>Every time I’m …

Snark and sexting are making Patricia Lockwood a young poetry star

At age 32, Patricia Lockwood is making a splash in the poetry world — as you might expect, considering that her rise to literary fame included the publication of a 1200-word poem called "Rape Joke."<p>Lockwood wrote the poem in response to an uproar over stand-up comedian Daniel Tosh's <i>actual</i> rape …

How to Enjoy Poetry

<i>“True poetic practice implies a mind so miraculously attuned and illuminated that it can form words, by a chain of more-than coincidences, into a living entity,”</i> <b>Edward Hirsch</b> advised in his directive on how to read a poem. But how, exactly, does one cultivate such “true poetic practice”? In an …

Mary Oliver on the Mystery of the Human Psyche, the Secret of Great Poetry, and How Rhythm Makes Us Come Alive

<i>“Poetry makes possible the deepest kind of personal possession of the world,”</i> James Dickey wrote. <i>“The way to develop good taste in literature,”</i> Joseph Brodsky advised, <i>“is to read poetry.”</i> Wordsworth believed the poetic form to be <i>“the breath and finer spirit of all knowledge.”</i> For Edward Hirsch, it …

Paris Review - Anne Carson, The Art of Poetry No. 88

Interviewed by Will Aitken<p>Issue 171, Fall 2004<p>Anne Carson and I first met in 1988 at a writers’ workshop in Canada, and have been reading each other’s work ever since. The interview that follows is a mix of our usual conversation and discussion about topics that preoccupy Carson’s work—mysticism, …

Paris Review - Billy Collins, The Art of Poetry No. 83

Interviewed by George Plimpton<p>Issue 159, Fall 2001<p>Billy Collins, ca. 2011. Photograph by David Shankbone<p>The big news, of course, is that Billy Collins has been appointed the new poet laureate by the Library of Congress, now the newest of a distinguished list that among others includes Robert Penn …

Literature

Paris Review - Jorie Graham, The Art of Poetry No. 85

Interviewed by Thomas Gardner<p>Issue 165, Spring 2003<p>Jorie Graham has published eight books of poems since 1980: <i>Hybrids of Plants and of Ghosts</i>, <i>Erosion</i>, <i>The End of Beauty</i>, <i>Region of Unlikeness</i>, <i>Materialism</i>, <i>The Errancy, Swarm</i>, and <i>Never</i>. Her selected poems, <i>The Dream of the Unified Field</i>, won the Pulitzer …

Paris Review - Les Murray, The Art of Poetry No. 89

© Valerie Murray<p>The dairy farm at Bunyah where Les Murray grew up is located between Forster and Gloucester in the Manning River area of New South Wales; or—to adopt the Aboriginal names—it lies between the districts of Coolongolook and Bucca Wauka. According to one of his most moving poems, "The …

Paris Review - James Tate, The Art of Poetry No. 92

Interviewed by Charles Simic<p>Issue 177, Summer 2006<p>James Tate, ca. 1965. Photograph by Elsa Dorfman<p>James Vincent Tate was born on December 8, 1943, in Kansas City, Missouri. He was educated at Kansas State College and at the University of Iowa, where he was still a student when his first book, <i>The</i> …