Jen

43 Flips | 8 Magazines | 6 Following | 2 Followers | @jgermino | Keep up with Jen on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Jen”

Searching for Sustainabile Clothing in India

Changing Planet<p><i>Andrew Flachs researches the trials of Indian farmers and their rush toward modern farming practices, such as GMO crops and new pesticides. The choices these farmers make aren’t always easy, even if they seem obvious—an entire host of factors may pressure them one way or the other.</i> …

Strongest Evidence Yet That Pygmies' Short Stature Is Genetic

Area of genome linked to growth differ between pygmies and neighboring groups.<p>It's not another tall tale: Evolutionary biologists have developed a new understanding of the genetic basis of short stature in humans. Also known as the pygmy phenotype, a study published Monday in the <i>Proceedings of the</i> …

100,000 African Elephants Poached Since 2010, Study Finds

Changing Planet<p><b>Ivory-seeking poachers have killed 100,000</b> <b>African elephants</b> <b>in just three years, according to a new study that provides the first reliable continent-wide estimates of illegal kills. During 2011 alone, roughly one of every twelve African elephants was killed by a poacher. (Read the</b> …

Bone Rush in the Arctic

Changing Planet<p><i>The hunt for fossils in the far-flung reaches of Svalbard is on! Jørn Hurum and his associates ply the arctic waters and snows of Svalbard to dig up some of the northernmost dinosaur fossils in the world. Their findings, particularly of ichthyosaurs, are some of the most unique on</i> …

Smithsonian.com | Smithsonian Magazine | Smithsonian

May 18, 2018<p>May 17, 2018<p>May 16, 2018

Switzerland’s valley of butterflies

The rugged, ancient landscape of Canton Valais is home to a variety of exquisite, endangered butterflies that draws lepidopterists from around the world.<p>I had not come to Valais, a rugged, ancient landscape that stretches along Switzerland’s Rhône River Valley, for its ski slopes or Matterhorn …

Sleeping on stilts in the Amazon

At Brazil’s largest nature reserve, travellers can stay in treehouses, paddle past alligators and pick acai berries – but only 1,000 visitors a year are allowed in.<p>As 75-year-old villager Antônio Gomes told us stories of growing up in Boca do Mamirauá, a tiny settlement in the northern Amazon …

South Asia’s new adrenaline capital

Sri Lanka’s Central Highlands – a patchwork of waterfalls, craggy peaks and tropical jungles – is challenging Asia’s other great adventure capitals, including Pokhara and Leh.<p>It was 6 am and there was not another person in sight. The first rays of dawn split the thin vapour of clouds and I could …

Portugal’s anti-port

Port might be Portugal’s most famous export, but with a more affordable price point and roots that are uniquely Portuguese, vinho verde is the wine to drink every day.<p>There were nine musicians in all – playing horns, guitars, accordions – and that's if you didn't count the rest of us, improvising …

Forgotten landscapes outside Krakow

Linked to Krakow by a portion of the Amber Trail Greenway, Tyniec’s limestone cliffs, dense woodland and millennia-old abbey comprise one of Eastern Europe’s most overlooked villages.<p>Running along the rivers between the Baltic and Adriatic seas, Poland’s ancient trade routes used to crowd with …

Living in: Istanbul

With its dynamism, diversity and double-continent span – not to mention its 14 million residents and 2,600-year history – Istanbul has an option for every mood and moment.<p>As a city that spans two continents and has more than 14 million residents, Istanbul offers so much variety that, residents say, …

How Iceland’s baby volcano was born

In 1973, a 1,600m-long fissure erupted on Iceland’s island of Heimaey, spewing lava, ash and destroying 800 houses – and birthing a new volcano that remains live, and warm, even today.<p>On 23 January 1973 on Heimaey, the largest of Iceland’s Westman Islands, a 1,600m-long fissure split open and began …

China’s Atlantis of the East

The Chinese city of Shicheng was flooded in 1959, then forgotten. With its recent rediscovery, divers can explore a 600-year-old city that is both underwater – and unseen for decades.<p>Often called the “Atlantis of the East” by travellers, the underwater city of Shicheng is a magnificent, mysterious …

Inside the Pope’s private gardens

Castel Gandolfo has served as the Pope’s summer retreat since the 17th Century. For the first time, the gardens surrounding the residence are open to the public.<p>Castel Gandolfo has served as the Pope’s summer retreat since the 17th Century. For the first time, the gardens surrounding the residence …

India’s hidden Himalayas of Ladakh

India’s semi-autonomous region of Ladakh shares Tibet’s Himalayan peaks, Buddhist culture, spectacular scenery and traditional living – yet receives only a fraction of its visitors.

The wildest side of Nairobi

Forget the Maasai Mara – it’s in the polluted, congested three million-strong capital where you really understand how wild Africa can be.<p>I had not expected to see a giraffe at the breakfast buffet. The 6m-tall herbivore had bent its elongated, spotted neck through the open conservatory-style …

Turkey’s religious ghost town

Until the deportations of 1923, Muslims and Christians lived harmoniously in the Turkish town of Kayakoy. Today, the ghost town remains a poignant reminder of happier times.<p>Few independent tourists make their way to Kayakoy, a ghost town just 5km west of the tattoo parlours, British pubs and dance …

In Pakistan, imposing tombs that few have seen

Just 90km west of the largest city in Pakistan, Makli is the final resting place of more than half a million people. Yet its intricate tombs are little known to travellers today.<p>Covering more than 10sqkm, Makli is one of the world’s largest necropolises, acting as the final resting place of more …

Trekking in China, where dragons stand guard

Get a different perspective on Tiger Leaping Gorge by walking the 22km High Path, a two-day trek through remote Naxi hill farming terraces that is far removed from the tourist hordes.<p>For sheer dramatic natural beauty, Tiger Leaping Gorge in China’s Yunnan province takes some beating. Situated …

See the Best of Travel 365

See the Best of Travel 365

How World War I Helps Explain Today's Middle East Bloodshed

Hitler's ambition sparked the Second World War, but the tinderbox of Eastern Europe was its fuel.<p>The Great War, as it came to be known, lasted four years, from 1914 to 1918. But its aftereffects haunted Europe and the rest of the world through the 20th century—and are still felt in our own times.<p>In …

On the Hundredth Anniversary of the Start of World War I, Remembering the Part Animals Played

Horses, dogs, pigeons—even glowworms—were crucial participants in the war to end all wars.<p>Tucked between two lanes of traffic at Brook Gate, in London's leafy Hyde Park, two heavily laden mules, cast in bronze, trudge terrified but steadfast across an imaginary battlefield. In front of them, carved …

Peru’s first-ever high-resolution carbon map could help the world breathe easier

Changing Planet<p><b>To put an accurate price on carbon, you need to know how much you have and where it’s located, researchers say</b><p>Stanford University scientists have produced the first-ever high-resolution carbon geography of Peru, a country whose tropical forests are among the world’s most vital in …

Zaña, Peru: The Town That Almost Was

Changing Planet<p><i>Sarah Kennedy is a zooarchaeologist investigating the lives of native Peruvians under Spanish rule in their colonial period. By analyzing the remains of animals in past settlements, she is able to piece together a mosaic of knowledge about how ancient people lived.</i><p>This summer, I have …

Big Data Reveals How Cities Beckoned the Brainy for 2,000 Years

Historical figures have moved to cities in the same way for centuries.<p>How do you keep them down on the farm, once they've seen Paris? You don't, suggests a study of 150,000 historical figures that shows cities have long acted as cultural magnets.<p>The brainy headed away from the hinterlands in the …

Q&A: Can Airlifting Rhinos Out of South Africa Save the Species?

In 2015 an organization called Rhinos Without Borders will move a hundred rhinos from South Africa to Botswana.<p>Over the past three decades National Geographic Explorers-in-Residence Dereck and Beverly Joubert, who are based in Botswana's Okavango Delta, have focused their movie and still cameras on …

Q&A: Why Sunni Extremists Are Destroying Ancient Religious Sites in Mosul

The Islamic State is demolishing tombs, statues, mosques, and shrines of importance to Christians, Muslims, and Jews.<p>Mosul has long been known for its religious diversity. Iraq's second largest city has been home to Persians, Arabs, Turks, and Christians of all denominations since it was first …