Janice Cook

32 Flips | 2 Magazines | @janicecook509 | Keep up with Janice Cook on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Janice Cook”

Yonkers Train Station Offers a Glimpse into the Grand Central that Might Have Been

As you pull into the Yonkers train station, you couldn’t feel farther from Grand Central. A few sleepy platforms greet you as you exit the train. …

STRONGER THAN EVER!!!!!!

9/11

Never Forget .. Patriot Day in United States Patriot Day is an annual observance on September 11 to remember those who were injured or died during the terrorist attacks in the United States on September 11, 2001. Many Americans refer Patriot Day as 9/11 or September 11. On the direction of the President, the flag of the United States of America should be displayed on the homes of Americans, the White House and all United States government buildings in the whole world. The flag should be flown at half-mast as a mark of respect to those who died on September 11, 2001. Many people observe a moment of silence at 8:46 AM (Eastern Daylight Time). This marks the time that the first plane flew into the World Trade Center. The September 11 attacks (also referred to as September 11, September 11th, or 9/11 were a series of four coordinated terrorist attacks launched by the Islamic terrorist group al-Qaeda upon the United States in New York City and the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. Four passenger airliners were hijacked by 19 al-Qaeda terrorists so they could be flown into buildings in suicide attacks. Two of those planes, American Airlines Flight 11 and United Airlines Flight 175, were crashed into the North and South towers, respectively, of the World Trade Center complex in New York City. Within two hours, both towers collapsed with debris and the resulting fires causing partial or complete collapse of all other buildings in the WTC complex, as well as major damage to ten other large surrounding structures. A third plane, American Airlines Flight 77, was crashed into the Pentagon (the headquarters of the United States Department of Defense), leading to a partial collapse in its western side. The fourth plane, United Airlines Flight 93, was targeted at Washington, D.C., but crashed into a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania after its passengers tried to overcome the hijackers. In total, almost 3,000 people died in the attacks, including the 227 civilians and 19 hijackers aboard the four planes. It also was the deadliest incident for firefighters in the history of the United States. Suspicion quickly fell on al-Qaeda. Although the group's leader, Osama bin Laden, initially denied any involvement, in 2004 he claimed responsibility for the attacks. Al-Qaeda and bin Laden cited U.S. support of Israel, the presence of U.S. troops in Saudi Arabia, and sanctions against Iraq as motives for the attacks. The United States responded to the attacks by launching the War on Terror and invading Afghanistan to depose the Taliban, which had harbored al-Qaeda. Many countries strengthened their anti-terrorism legislation and expanded law enforcement powers. Having evaded capture for years, bin Laden was located and killed by U.S. forces in May 2011. The destruction of the Twin Towers and other properties caused serious damage to the economy of Lower Manhattan and had a significant effect on global markets. Cleanup of the World Trade Center site was completed in May 2002, and the Pentagon was repaired within a year. Numerous memorials have been constructed, including the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York, the Pentagon Memorial, and the Flight 93 National Memorial in Pennsylvania. After a lengthy delay, the 1,776-foot-tall (541 m) One World Trade Center was completed at the World Trade Center site in New York City in 2013. The attacks resulted in the deaths of 2,996 people, including the 19 hijackers and 2,977 victims. The victims included 246 on the four planes (from which there were no survivors), 2,606 in New York City in the towers and on the ground, and 125 at the Pentagon. Nearly all of the victims were civilians; 55 military personnel were among those killed at the Pentagon. More than 90% of the workers and visitors who died in the towers had been at or above the points of impact. In the North Tower 1,355 people at or above the point of impact were trapped and died of smoke inhalation, fell or jumped from the tower to escape the smoke and flames, or were killed in the building's eventual collapse. The destruction of all three staircases in the tower when Flight 11 hit made it impossible for anyone above the impact zone to escape. One hundred-seven people below the point of impact died as well. In the South Tower, one stairwell (A), was left intact after Flight 175 hit, allowing 14 people located on the floors of impact (including one man who saw the plane coming at him) and four more from the floors above to escape. 911 operators who received calls from individuals inside the tower were not well informed of the situation as it rapidly unfolded and as a result, told callers not to descend the tower on their own. 630 people died in that tower, fewer than half the number killed in the North Tower. Casualties in the South Tower were significantly reduced by some occupants deciding to start evacuating as soon as the North Tower was struck. At least 200 people fell or jumped to their deaths from the burning towers (as exemplified in the photograph The Falling Man), landing on the streets and rooftops of adjacent buildings hundreds of feet below. Some occupants of each tower above the point of impact made their way toward the roof in hope of helicopter rescue, but the roof access doors were locked. No plan existed for helicopter rescues, and the combination of roof equipment and thick smoke and intense heat prevented helicopters from approaching. A total of 411 emergency workers died as they tried to rescue people and fight fires. The New York City Fire Department (FDNY) lost 340 firefighters, a chaplain and two paramedics. The New York City Police Department (NYPD) lost 23 officers. The Port Authority Police Department lost 37 officers. Eight emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics from private emergency medical services units were killed. Cantor Fitzgerald L.P., an investment bank on the 101st–105th floors of the North Tower, lost 658 employees, considerably more than any other employer. Marsh Inc., located immediately below Cantor Fitzgerald on floors 93–100, lost 358 employees, and 175 employees of Aon Corporation were also killed. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) estimated that about 17,400 civilians were in the World Trade Center complex at the time of the attacks. Turnstile counts from the Port Authority suggest 14,154 people were typically in the Twin Towers by 8:45 a.m. The vast majority of people below the impact zone safely evacuated the buildings. After New York, New Jersey lost the most state citizens, with the city of Hoboken sustaining the most deaths. More than 90 countries lost citizens in the attacks on the World Trade Center. Two people were added to the official death toll after dying from health conditions linked to exposure to dust from the collapse of the World Trade Center. Weeks after the attack, the death toll was estimated to be over 6,000, more than twice the number of deaths eventually confirmed. The city was only able to identify remains for about 1,600 of the World Trade Center victims. The medical examiner's office collected "about 10,000 unidentified bone and tissue fragments that cannot be matched to the list of the dead". Bone fragments were still being found in 2006 by workers who were preparing to demolish the damaged Deutsche Bank Building. In 2010, a team of anthropologists and archaeologists searched for human remains and personal items at the Fresh Kills Landfill, where seventy-two more human remains were recovered, bringing the total found to 1,845. DNA profiling continues in an attempt to identify additional victims. Post 9/11/01, close to 1,400 first responders, rescue and recovery workers have died due to the toxins and carcinogens in the air at 'Ground Zero'.

Flags are at half-staff at the #911Memorial today. #Honor911 #NeverForget http://t.co/AJ5B6pw6yp

Amazing photo! #Honor911 @Golfweek_Dusek Unbelievable view flying over lower Manhattan #NeverForget http://t.co/cdUpeoKEQ6

RT @edutopia: Today we pay tribute to the brave people who lost their lives on #911. #AlwaysRemember http://t.co/Q5oQR0PRqF

Thanks @BofA_Community for taking the time to #Honor911. Visit the #911Memorial billboard in Times Square today. #NYC http://t.co/Ky1k7jaEqd

9/11 United We Stand

Lean + Green: The New Empire State Building

<i>By Denver Nicks</i><p>The traveling spirit tends to seek out unfamiliar, untrammeled places, so as a denizen of New York who sees the Empire State Building almost daily, I wasn’t sure what to make of my invitation to take a “behind the scenes” tour.<p>But I had never seen it like this.<p>The iconic Art Deco …

Annie Fitzsimmons’s NYC

When star blogger and licensed New York City tour guide <b>Annie Fitzsimmons</b> started to fill out this questionnaire, she was reminded of a saying from her alma mater, Texas A&M University: “From the outside looking in, you can’t understand it. From the inside looking out, you can’t explain it.” That’s …

24 Hours in Manhattan: Hotels with More Than Beds

Manhattan’s hyper-competitive luxury hotels are always trying to outdo each other. But they’ve been taking it to a new level lately.<p>How else would you describe a museum-quality art collection, a 3D movie theater, or the finest indoor pool this side of Central Park?<p>At the Peninsula New York, that’s …

The Best Holiday Treats in NYC

I ducked into Jacques Torres’ chocolate oasis and came face to face with a police officer. I love the NYPD, largely because of their help in silencing the ear-splitting music from Madame X nightclub near my first apartment, so I welcome the sight. But I wonder if he’s there to investigate a candy …

Warm Up: 10 Cozy Spots in NYC

“I hate hazelnuts,” I said to Chef Kyle McLelland as my boyfriend Andy and I prepared to tuck into the tasting menu at Prospect in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. He smiled and asked, “Can I change your mind?” Feeling gutsy, I said “Sure, why not?” Though I wasn’t born one, my extensive travels have made me …

5 Must-See Pieces at the Met

The next time you visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, you must say hello to “William.”<p>The small blue statuette has been the museum’s unofficial mascot since he made his debut in 1917. But don’t let his youthful looks fool you; he’s been around for almost four millennia. Today, …

The Best of the West Village

The West Village is a labyrinth of shady brownstone-lined streets, hidden gardens, corner shops, and a mix of sophisticated culinary temples and casual downhome joints. It’s also a place I’m proud to call home.<p>I often find myself thinking <i>I feel like I’m on the set of a movie</i> while wandering this …

Hyper-Local Tours in NYC

Having recently played “tourist” in my own hometown (see previous post), I felt inspired to explore more of New York from an out-of-towner’s perspective. I’ve already done the Circle Line cruise, all the major museums, a city bus tour, and even a bike trip through Harlem, so I was looking for a new …

Behind the Scenes in Central Park

It has been said that Central Park was the first place in New York City where people from all walks of life could gather and relax together. This still rings true today, with the 843-acre park drawing 40 million visitors a year.<p>More than any other landmark, Central Park reflects the brilliance of …

NYC by Pizza

On a typical day, Scott Wiener teaches children about the science of pizza at the New York Public Library, researches his forthcoming book on pizza boxes, and leads at least one of the pizza tours for which he’s most known. As Adam Brija, manager at the legendary Patsy’s Pizzeria, said of Scott, …

Picture Archive: 1980s Brooklyn

Erik’s Brooklyn

<b>Erik Trinidad</b> of The Global Trip has traveled to dozens of countries around the world, but he’s been proud call Brooklyn home for the past five years. Check out a few of his favorite things about New York City’s most populous borough (by far, actually), then add your own two cents by leaving a …

Why I Love the Upper East Side

I’ll just say it: I love the Upper East Side.<p>I’ve heard grumbles and witnessed eye-rolls from people who see it as the land of <i>Gossip Girl</i> and old-money families — and those who think the far East Side is for recent college grads sharing studio apartments.<p>While there’s truth to every stereotype, the …

Travels on the Run: Lower Manhattan

Central Park is the obvious go-to run in NYC, but for something different (and because it’s near my hotel), I jog to the esplanade that runs along the Hudson River in Lower Manhattan and head south. (Note: Hudson River Park extends 5 miles from 59th Street south to Battery Park)<p>As I clip along this …

New York Travel Guide

Free Things to Do in New York City

Finding free activities to fill your day in the City That Never Sleeps is easier than you might think. With countless cultural attractions and a large city parks system, there's plenty to do that won't cost you a cent.<p><b>Art/Music</b><p>Skip the $25 ticket price when the <b>Museum of Modern Art</b> opens its doors, …

New York Sights

See New York photos in this gallery from National Geographic’s Ultimate City Guide for New York City.

New York Must-Dos

Our experts recommend the top attractions in and around New York—with advice on how to get the most out of your visit.<p><b>Ferry to Governors Island</b><br>172 acres (70 hectares) of quiet in the center of New York Harbor. "Part of the island is a national monument, with astonishing views of the skyline and …

New York Central Park

See New York City photos in this gallery from National Geographic’s Ultimate City Guide for New York City.