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Astronomy
APOD: NGC 891 Edge-on (2013 Oct 11) 
Image Credit & Copyright: Adam Block, 
Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, Univ. of Arizona 
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap131011.html 

Explanation: This sharp cosmic portrait features NGC 891. The spiral galaxy spans about 100 thousand light-years and is seen almost exactly edge-on from our perspective. In fact, about 30 million light-years distant in the constellation Andromeda, NGC 891 looks a lot like our Milky Way. At first glance, it has a flat, thin, galactic disk and a central bulge cut along the middle by regions of dark obscuring dust. The combined image data also reveal the galaxy's young blue star clusters and telltale pinkish star forming regions. And remarkably apparent in NGC 891's edge-on presentation are filaments of dust that extend hundreds of light-years above and below the center line. The dust has likely been blown out of the disk by supernova explosions or intense star formation activity. Faint neighboring galaxies can also be seen near this galaxy's disk. 

http://www.caelumobservatory.com/ 
http://skycenter.arizona.edu/ 
http://www.as.arizona.edu/ 

Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page 
http://asterisk.apod.com/discuss_apod.php?date=131011 

#APOD

APOD: NGC 891 Edge-on (2013 Oct 11) Image Credit & Copyright: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, Univ. of Arizona Explanation: This sharp cosmic portrait features NGC 891. The spiral galaxy spans about 100 thousand light-years and is seen almost exactly edge-on from our perspective. In fact, about 30 million light-years distant in the constellation Andromeda, NGC 891 looks a lot like our Milky Way. At first glance, it has a flat, thin, galactic disk and a central bulge cut along the middle by regions of dark obscuring dust. The combined image data also reveal the galaxy's young blue star clusters and telltale pinkish star forming regions. And remarkably apparent in NGC 891's edge-on presentation are filaments of dust that extend hundreds of light-years above and below the center line. The dust has likely been blown out of the disk by supernova explosions or intense star formation activity. Faint neighboring galaxies can also be seen near this galaxy's disk. Starship Asterisk* • APOD Discussion Page #APOD

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