Igorgomes

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Good Charts

Publication Date: <b>May 17, 2016</b><p>A good visualization can communicate the nature and potential impact of information and ideas more powerfully than any other form of communication. For a long time "dataviz" was left to specialists--data scientists and professional designers. No longer. A new generation …

How human culture influences our genetics

The way we eat, cook, explore and interact with others can influence our genes, says Jason G Goldman. So how will modern culture shape our children?<p>You shouldn't be able to drink milk. Your ancestors couldn't. It is only in the last 9,000 years that human adults have gained that ability without …

Stephen Hawking’s Charming Children’s Book about Time-Travel, Co-Written with His Daughter

It’s not uncommon for famous authors of “adult” literature to have also penned lesser-known but no less lovely children’s books — take, for instance, those by Mark Twain, Maya Angelou, James Joyce, E. E. Cummings, and Sylvia Plath. Famous scientists, on the other hand, are more likely to become the …

How Art Can Save Your Soul

<i>“Art holds out the promise of inner wholeness,”</i> British philosopher Alain de Botton wrote in <b>Art as Therapy</b> (<i>public library</i>), one of the best art books of 2013. He expounds the premise of the book in this fantastic “Sunday sermon” from The School of Life — the lecture series de Botton founded in …

The Culture and Costs of Anxiety

<i>“Anxiety … makes others feel as you might when a drowning man holds on to you,”</i> Anaïs Nin wrote. <i>“Anxiety may be compared with dizziness. He whose eye happens to look down the yawning abyss becomes dizzy,”</i> Kierkegaard observed. <i>“There is no question that the problem of anxiety is a nodal point at</i> …

Henry James on Memory, Growing Older, and What Happiness Really Means

What does it take to live a good life, to flourish, to be happy? The art-science of happiness has been contemplated since the dawn of recorded thought, and yet no agreement seems to have been reached: For Albert Camus, it was about escaping our self-imposed prisons; for Alan Watts, about living …

Reinventing the Wheel: A Design History of the Circle as a Visual Metaphor for Information

<i>“Everything rolls, everything comes back; eternally rolls the wheel of being,”</i> Nietzsche wrote in <i>Thus Spoke Zarathustra</i>. Indeed, it seems that for as far back as we’re able to peer into human history, the wheel has been one of our most central visual metaphors for being. From our early maps of the …

Advice from Artists on How to Overcome Creative Block, Handle Criticism, and Nurture Your Sense of Self-Worth

<i>“Inspiration is for amateurs — the rest of us just show up and get to work,”</i> Chuck Close scoffed. <i>“A self-respecting artist must not fold his hands on the pretext that he is not in the mood,”</i> Tchaikovsky admonished. <i>“Show up, show up, show up, and after a while the muse shows up, too,”</i> Isabel Allende …

The Science of Our Warped Perception of Time, Animated

Why the same amount of time can seem to fly or slow to a crawl depending on the context.<p>In 2013, a mind-bending read on the psychology of why time slows down when we’re afraid, speeds up as we age, and gets warped when we’re on vacation became one of the year’s most popular articles. Now, …

Buckminster Fuller Presages Online Education, with a Touch of TED, Netflix, and Pandora, in 1962

In 1962, <b>Buckminster Fuller</b> (July 12, 1895–July 1, 1983) delivered a prophetic lecture at Southern Illinois University on the future of education aimed at “solving problems by design competence instead of by political reform.” It was eventually published as <b>Education Automation: Comprehensive</b> …

Italo Calvino on Distraction, Procrastination, and Newspapers as the Proto-Time-Waster

In the early 1980s, shortly before Saul Bellow lamented “the distracted public,” another literary titan, <b>Italo Calvino</b> — a sage of the written word, feminist, keen critic of America, man of heartening New Year’s resolutions — considered the role of distraction in his own life. In his short …

Creativity, the Gift of Failure, and the Crucial Difference Between Success and Mastery

<i>“You gotta be willing to fail… if you’re afraid of failing, you won’t get very far,”</i> Steve Jobs cautioned. <i>“There is no such thing as failure — failure is just life trying to move us in another direction,”</i> Oprah counseled new Harvard graduates. In his wonderfully heartening letter of fatherly …

Mary Roach on the Science of Masturbation and the Outrageous Vintage Pseudoscientific Techniques for Controlling It

Human sexuality has a long history of intellectual fascination, from the first ejaculation on Earth to Malcolm Cowley’s parodic vintage prediction for sex in the techno-future to Susan Sontag’s poignant meditation on the gap between love and sex. But the recent perusal of Mark Twain’s entertaining …

How to Master on the Art of Getting Noticed: Austin Kleon’s Advice to Aspiring Artists

In 2012, artist Austin Kleon gave us <i>Steal Like an Artist</i>, a modern manifesto for combinatorial creativity that went on to become one of the best art books that year. He now returns with <b>Show Your Work!</b> (<i>public library</i> | <i>IndieBound</i>) — “a book for people who hate the very idea of self-promotion,” in …

Einstein on Fairy Tales and Education

Albert Einstein, celebrated as “the quintessential modern genius,” is credited with many things — from era-defining scientific discoveries to great wisdom on everything from creativity to kindness to war to the secret to learning anything. Among them is also a sentiment of admirable insight yet …

Happy Birthday, Standard Time: How the Railroads Gave Us Time Zones

Our internal time, distorted as it is, may dictate a great deal of our lives, but it is external time — the scientific and cultural conventions of timekeeping — that anchors the rhythms of society. One of those most central timekeeping anchors was born on March 19, 1918, when the United States …

Larry and Friends: An Illustrated Ode to Immigration, Diversity, Otherness, and Kindness

Much has been said about the lack of diversity in children’s books. But these discussions — as most conversations about diversity — have been largely co-opted by questions of race, overlooking other elements of diversity, such as nationality and native language. This is particularly perplexing in …