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Back always killing you? These yoga poses can help

<b>Strengthening the Back and Core</b><p>A lot of back problems stem from weak or imbalanced muscles and poor core strength. These yoga poses will build a …

What Is Yoga, Really?

I started practicing yoga in the late 80s/early 90s when yoga was already very accessible, but not practiced by many. Back then, classes were only available in a yoga studio that was strictly dedicated to the practice of yoga. Now we are in a different time. Today, yoga is discussed in film, …

Manual Therapy for Ankle Sprains

2 comments<p>image courtesy of aafp.org<p>What are your options for ankle sprains? A recent study shows that manual therapy by a trained physical therapist …

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Frozen Shoulder Exercises Wand exercise, Flexion: Stand upright and hold a stick in both hands, palms down. Stretch your arms by lifting them over your head, keeping your arms straight. Hold for 5 seconds and return to the starting position. Repeat 10 times. Wand exercise, Extension: Stand upright and hold a stick in both hands behind your back. Move the stick away from your back. Hold this position for 5 seconds. Relax and return to the starting position. Repeat 10 times. Wand exercise, External rotation: Lie on your back and hold a stick in both hands, palms up. Your upper arms should be resting on the floor with your elbows at your sides and bent 90 degrees. Use your uninjured arm to push your injured arm out away from your body. Keep the elbow of your injured arm at your side while it is being pushed. Hold the stretch for 5 seconds. Repeat 10 times. Wand exercise, Internal rotation: Stand with your uninjured arm behind your head holding the end of a stick. Put your injured arm behind your back at your waist and grab the stick. Pull the stick up behind your back by straightening the elbow of your uninjured arm and bending the elbow of your injured arm. Hold this position for 5 seconds and then go back to the starting position. Repeat 10 times. Wand exercise, Shoulder abduction and adduction: Stand and hold a stick with both hands, palms facing away from your body. Rest the stick against the front of your thighs. Use your uninjured arm to push your injured arm out to the side and up as high as possible. Keep your arms straight. Hold for 5 seconds. Repeat 10 times. Scapular active range of motion: Stand and shrug your shoulders up and hold for 5 seconds. Then squeeze your shoulder blades back and together and hold 5 seconds. Next, pull your shoulder blades downward as if putting them in your back pocket. Relax. Repeat this sequence 10 times. Pectoralis stretch: Stand in an open doorway or corner with both hands slightly above your head on the door frame or wall. Slowly lean forward until you feel a stretch in the front of your shoulders. Hold 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times. Biceps stretch: Stand facing a wall (about 6 inches away from the wall). Raise your injured arm out to your side and place the thumb side of your hand against the wall (palm down). Keep your arm straight. Rotate your body in the opposite direction of the raised arm until you feel a stretch in your biceps. Hold 15 seconds. Repeat 3 times. Sleeper stretch: Lie on your injured side with your hips and knees flexed and your arm straight out in front of you. Bend the elbow on your injured side to a right angle so that your fingers are pointing toward the ceiling. Then use your other hand to gently push your arm down toward the floor. Keep your shoulder blades lightly squeezed together as you do this exercise. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times. Comment, Like and Share with your Friends www.physio-therapy.cz

Muscular System Comment, Like and Share with your Friends www.physio-therapy.cz

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Jumper's Knee What is jumper’s knee? Jumper’s knee is inflammation or micro-tears in the tendon that connects the kneecap (patella) to the shinbone. It is also called patellar tendinopathy. Tendons, are strong bands of connective tissue that attach muscle to bone. When a tendon is acutely injured it is called a strain. Tendonitis is when a tendon is inflamed. When there are micro-tears in a tendon from repeated injury it is called tendinosis. Tendinopathy is the term for both inflammation and micro-tears. How does it occur? Activities that put repeated stress on the patellar tendon can cause it to be inflamed. Too much jumping is the most common cause. Other repeated activities such as running, walking, or bicycling may also cause the problem. Jumper’s knee can also happen if your hips, legs, knees, or feet are not aligned properly. People whose hips are wide, who are knock-kneed, or who have feet with arches that collapse when they walk or run can have this problem. The patellar tendon may sometimes rupture or tear completely during strenuous activity. What are the symptoms? Symptoms may include: pain and tenderness around the patellar tendon swelling in your knee joint or swelling where the patellar tendon attaches to the shinbone pain with jumping, running, or walking, especially downhill or downstairs pain when you bend or straighten the leg tenderness behind the kneecap If your patellar tendon is ruptured, usually you will have sudden severe pain and you will not be able to straighten your leg or walk. How is it diagnosed? Your healthcare provider will examine your knee. He or she will also have you run, jump, or squat to see if this causes pain. Your feet will be examined to see if you have a problem with over-pronation. You may have X-rays or an MRI of your knee. How is it treated? To treat this condition: Put an ice pack, gel pack, or package of frozen vegetables, wrapped in a cloth on the area every 3 to 4 hours, for up to 20 minutes at a time. Elevate your knee on a pillow when you sit or lie down. Take an anti-inflammatory medicine such as ibuprofen, or other medicine as directed by your provider. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDs) may cause stomach bleeding and other problems. These risks increase with age. Read the label and take as directed. Unless recommended by your healthcare provider, do not take for more than 10 days. Follow your provider’s instructions for doing exercises to help you recover. Your healthcare provider will show you exercises to help decrease the pain behind your kneecap. Your healthcare provider may suggest that you: Wear shoe inserts (called orthotics) for over-pronation. You can buy orthotics at a pharmacy or athletic shoe store or they can be custom-made. Use an infrapatellar strap, a strap placed beneath the kneecap over the patellar tendon. Wear a neoprene knee sleeve, which supports your knee and patella. While you recover from your injury, you will need to change your sport or activity to one that does not make your condition worse. For example, bicycle or swim instead of run. In severe cases, you may need surgery. How long will the effects it last? A tendon that is only mildly inflamed and has just started to hurt may improve within a few weeks. A tendon that is significantly inflamed and has been painful for a long time may take up to a few months to improve. You need to stop doing the activities that cause pain until your tendon has healed. If you continue doing activities that cause pain, your symptoms will return and it will take longer to recover. When can I return to my normal activities? Everyone recovers from an injury at a different rate. Return to your activities depends on how soon your knee recovers, not by how many days or weeks it has been since your injury has occurred. In general, the longer you have symptoms before you start treatment, the longer it will take to get better. The goal is to return to your normal activities as soon as is safely possible. If you return too soon you may worsen your injury. You may safely return to your normal activities when, starting from the top of the list and progressing to the end, each of the following is true: you can straighten and bend your injured knee without pain your knee and leg are as strong as your uninjured knee and leg your knee is not swollen you are able bend, walk, and squat without pain How can I prevent jumper’s knee? Jumper’s knee can best be prevented by having strong thigh muscles. It also helps to stretch before and after exercising, and wear shoes that fit properly and are right for the activity. Comment, Like and Share with Friends www.physio-therapy.cz

Transitioning From Injury to Strength Training

• 9shares<br>• 5<p>If you ever work with injured people, you will inevitably get the question from a patient at some point “how do I transition back into …

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Whole Body Stretching Exersice Comment, Like and Share with Friends www.physio-therapy.cz

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