Patrick Robinson

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Tonight's West Seattle sunset. Photo by Patrick Robinson https://t.co/7bj9U67qXv

Tonight's Rainbow on Alki. Photo by Patrick Robinson https://t.co/uJVnLB3glp

West Seattle sunset. Photo by Patrick Robinson https://t.co/i9dEFLdMv4

By Jean Godden Michelle Wolf, the young woman who delivered the roast at the recent White House Correspondents Dinner, was severely criticized, not only by President Donald Trump but by some members of the press itself. They said she was too mean, too personal and too raunchy. Some critics argued that Wolf should apologize to her targets and the entire event should be rethought, perhaps discontinued. Taken as a whole, reaction to Wolf's performance seems blown out of proportion. What she said was indeed rude and blue. There is even realization that her comedy was not laugh-out-loud funny except for a certain surprise factor. Can an attractive young woman addressing a crowd of tuxedoed and gowned journalists, politicians and celebrities really be saying that? Wolf was reaching for gasps rather than just guffaws. There is one school of thought -- and I can sympathize -- that takes a moderate, defensive stance on Wolf's speech. Defenders point out that Wolf was only following recent tradition. Past performances at White House Correspondents events -- Stephen Colbert's roast among them -- have not hesitated to twist knives in sore spots and talk truth to power. Then there is the current standard, pushed by the president himself, to demonize and bully opponents and to ridicule women's looks. Certainly, as far as raunch is concerned, the president with his "grab them by the pussy" remark has set the bar so low that it is not possible to outdo the King of Crude. There is misogyny here. One wonders about the reaction if, instead of Michelle Wolf, the monologue (leaving out the abortion joke) had been delivered by Seth Meyers or Bill Mayer. Would there have been a different, perhaps even a yawning comeback? After all, a roast is a roast and comedians seldom deliver bouquets. Society still finds it hard to accept that women can be funny. I discovered that fact myself, first as a columnist and again when I ran for office. It was interesting to discover that, when it came to humor, jabs went unnoticed as long as I stuck to making fun of myself or poking at male targets. But whenever I made a joke about a woman, it provoked an outsized response. One time I used my column to joke about phone-answering messages allegedly left by local politicos. I erred when I wrote that state Democratic Party chair Karen Marchioro had a voice message saying she had missed your call because she was "off in Nicaragua teaching the Sandinistas to fight dirty." I thought it was a mild, even lame, joke. But the next morning I heard from Bill Ames, my old journalism professor, yelling into the phone. Apparently, I violated a code about a woman making fun of another woman. Wolf made the same mistake: a woman attacking other women when she skewered Kellyanne Conway and Sarah Huckabee Sanders. The Sanders jokes were raw, particularly when Wolf compared Sanders to Auntie Lydia, the meanest character on "The Handmaid's Tale."On the other hand, Sanders, in her job as press secretary, has not been a shrinking violet. She hands out blatant falsehoods, white washes executive actions and is none too kind to reporters who are merely doing their job, trying to inform the readers and listeners. To ridicule Sander's eye makeup, with the target seated steps away, may have been tasteless, but it was not undeserved. White House Correspondent president Margaret Tallev, interviewed the day after the dinner, said she had no regrets about inviting Wolf to speak. Tallev agreed that Wolf had been polarizing, but added, "Comedy is meant to provoke thought and debate."Beyond the raunchy roast, there is a more significant question: What is the rationale for the correspondents' dinner itself? Should media be sitting down with newsmakers? While it might be OK to meet over coffee to elicit information, coming together in evening wear to dine on leg of lamb and chortle over raw jokes should cause discomfort. Reporters, they say, should have no friends. After all, how can one write unbiased news, the unvarnished truth, about last night's dinner companion? if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_2'); }); }

<b>By Jean Godden</b><p>Michelle Wolf, the young woman who delivered the roast at the recent White House Correspondents Dinner, was severely criticized, not …

By Lindsay Peyton A group of West Seattle students won the golden ticket--not to tour Willy Wonka’s factory alongside Charlie but instead to peek inside the wondrous world of the Spheres. Heidi Paulson’s seventh grade social studies class trekked to the Amazon campus from Louis Boren STEM K-8 School on Friday, April 27. Boarding the bus to the Spheres, Paulson could already feel the excitement brewing in her students. “There are not a lot of opportunities to see the Amazon Spheres,” Paulson said. Amazon opened its new monumental biospheres to members of the community in honor of Arbor Day. Guests were invited to learn about local city programs and environmentally focused organizations The company’s horticulture ambassadors guided students through the urban jungles, teaching them about the more than 600 species of plants in the Spheres, as well as Amazon’s own programs designed to foster sustainability. Paulson said the tour was an ideal way for her students to see history in the making. “Amazon is shaping Seattle,” she said. Already the students have studied the pioneering culture of the region. “Washington was one of the later territories,” she said. “The whole West Coast has a different persona.” Members of the public now have the opportunity to register for tours of the Spheres. Program manager Justin Schroeder said it’s worth signing up for a spot. “We’ve created a really unique environment,” he said. “The plant palette we have is really surprising. We wanted to make it meaningful and impactful and tell a story.” Perusing the first floor is like walking on the forest floor, he explained. Heading upstairs brings plants to eye level. It’s part conservatory and part office space. Amazon employees work over laptops and espressos from the Spheres’ coffee shop. An array of fish swims in tanks. Plants ascend the walls, reaching for the sun shinning through the domed windows. “As we invested in building in a urban setting, the one thing missing was a connection to nature,” Schroeder said. “We’re giving our employees a place to go to get out of the urban environment and get back to nature. And we’re really excited to extend that to the public.” Recently the Spheres became available to the public for weekend visits. Visitors areable to roam the space on their own two Saturdays a month. Ambassadors are available on site to teach about the plants and the architecture. Reservations are required and are available up 30 days prior to each public Saturday. The Spheres have also been added the Amazon headquarter tours, which are available every 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays by reservation. The visitor center “Understory” is separate from the indoor gardens of the Spheres, but available without reservation from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays. For more information, visit www.seattlespheres.com. if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_2'); }); }

<b>By Lindsay Peyton</b><p>A group of West Seattle students won the golden ticket--not to tour Willy Wonka’s factory alongside Charlie but instead to peek …

Ferry on the black waters of Puget Sound. Photo by Patrick Robinson https://t.co/co8KPY6nmB

By Peggy Sturdivant The Haftersons were the first people to welcome us to the neighborhood. Idling their car in the alley along our snowy backyard white-haired Marion leaned over her husband Jim to say, “You must be the new neighbors.” Not missing a beat I replied, “And you must be the old neighbors.” When they both laughed I knew we were all in good company. They’d moved in with a newborn daughter forty years earlier, leaving behind a trailer home closer to Jim Hafterson’s mechanic work at Sea-Tac Airport. Jim Hafterson later told me, “It was the cheapest house that I could find, and it was in bad shape.” The house had good bones though, with a view of the Sound and a big yard. The Haftersons raised their two girls there, the alley becoming one big playground for lots of kids, with few fences in between. There were swing sets and sprinkler runs, Easter egg hunts and trick-or-treating. Now those children are grown-ups who remember being allowed to play in the basement of the house with the dance floor. But sometimes, even decades later, their best friend is the same. We met Jim and Marion after their daughters were grown. Yet their back porch was always a place for socializing; the coffeeshop across the street a regular meeting spot. The front yard boasted rose bushes and legendary blueberries. The back yard was home to rhubarb and plums, Tombstone roses and irises that smelled like grape Kool-Aid. The clothesline was used year round. Marion loved to tell the story about when they finally had to get a new washer and the delivery person kept asking, “Where’s your dryer.” She’d point to the clothesline. I had clothesline privileges. A few years ago Marion had some falls and her memory began to falter. Marion and Jim Hafterson moved over to Port Orchard to a retirement community that was supposed to be safer, but Marion broke a bone stepping off a curb almost immediately. She recovered and was able to receive rightful honors for her years of work with the Ballard Historical Society in June 2016. The last years have not been so kind, not to any of the Haftersons. if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_6'); }); }

<b>By Peggy Sturdivant</b><p>The Haftersons were the first people to welcome us to the neighborhood. Idling their car in the alley along our snowy backyard …

By Jean Godden Seattle is back in the headlines with the news that Seattle is one of only five cities able to boast that more people are moving here than are heading out. That means we're seeing a net increase of 21,000 per year or an average of 57 newbies each day. The gain is noteworthy since the other cities with net gains are all located in the Sun Belt. Besides, there are other cities -- Chicago for one -- where people are fleeing and they're losing population. All of this gives us incentive to get those thousands of newcomers up to speed. Let's help them on the way to becoming Real Seattleites. Here are the most important lifestyle changes that the would-be-natives need to adopt: Wardrobe: Real Seattleites dress mainly for the weather: gloom, mist, drizzle, flurry, showers and occasional deluge. A proper Seattle wardrobe will have two well-used raincoats, heavier for winter and lighter for summer. Residents need a collection of flannel-lined jeans for winter, stone-washed denim for summer and, of course, a fleece vest and a Seahawks' hoodie. Footgear should be a variation on hiking boots with lug soles and waterproofing. Driving: Seattleites do own cars, even if they don't always use them for commuting. How else will they get to the ski slopes in winter and the coast in summer? But there are arcane rules of the road when driving inside city limits. Most important is to navigate like the legendary Ballard driver, once known for forgetting to cancel turn signals, allowing a raincoat belt to trail alongside the driver's door and poking along at five miles below the speed limit. Seattleites never sound a horn except when losing their brakes on downhill inclines like Queen Anne's Counterbalance, Magnolia's West Dravus and Southwest College in Alki. Real Seattleites also know how to handle four-way stops where it's important to let the other driver go first, even if it means catching 40 winks while waiting your turn. Bicycling: Seattle veteran bike riders are among the most fearless athletes alive; they have to be to survive the city's daily crush of autos, buses and delivery trucks. They also have to guess when, without prior notice, bicycle lanes will be shut down to accommodate the latest out-of-scale construction project. On the good side, bicyclists are seldom asked to obey rules like respecting traffic lights and stop signs, wearing helmets or observing downhill speed limits. Walking: Real Seattleites religiously obey Walk/Don't Walk signs. They have been known to stand in torrential rainstorms, waiting for the "walk" light at traffic-free intersections at 3 a.m. They almost always stroll with eyes cast downward, knowing that it's the only way to keep from tripping over sidewalk potholes, tree root invasions, misplaced sandwich boards and unused newspaper boxes. Recyling: Seattleites not only believe in recycling, they insist others recycle as well. Never toss an empty pop bottle or can into a trash container; save it for the recycling bin, even if it means carrying it around for blocks. Don't want to finish that Seattle hotdog (the one with excess cream cheese and onions)? Deposit any leftovers in the proper food waste/compost receptacle. Or else. Sports: Real Seattleites are still stung over losing the Seattle Sonics basketball team a decade ago. But fans exhibit tremendous pride in the sports teams they do have ("Go Hawks!" and "How about those M's?") and they're apparently hankering for a new franchise or two. If you want to gain instant points, start talking up the Chinooks -- which may or may not be the name of a new NHL team. It helps to realize Chinook is a native word that means "ice eater." Reading: Real Seattleites, their noses stuck in a book or waterproof e-reader, are a bookseller's dream. Prepare for Seattle citizenship by brushing up on local bestsellers and be prepared to discuss this year's selection for "Seattle Reads." The Seattle Public Library program, celebrating its 20th year of all Seattle reading a single book, has been copied across the U.S. and in several other nations. Eating: Real Seattleites have culturally acquired tastebuds, favoring such regional delicacies as library-paste chowder, sandy clams and crabmeat dental floss. Fortunately, dozen of ethnic restaurants featuring exotic foods like pizza and tacos have moved into town and are supplementing the native fare. When it comes to gourmet establishments, be prepared to order the ultimate Northwest dish: geoduck (pronounced "gooey-duck") sushi. if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_2'); }); }

<b>By Jean Godden</b><p>Seattle is back in the headlines with the news that Seattle is one of only five cities able to boast that more people are moving here …

Seattle Parks and Recreation is looking for public input on playground renovations being planned for Puget Ridge Playground at 6029 21st Ave SW. Two meetings are set for the project. Please offer your input on this project by completing this survey. And join Seattle Parks at the community meeting on April 16. Public Meeting #1 Monday April 16, 2018 5 - 6:30 p.m. Sanislo Elementary School 1812 SW Myrtle Street, 98106 Public Meeting #2 Wednesday June 6, 2018 4 - 6 p.m. At the Puget Ridge Playground 6029 21st Avenue SW, 98106 The renovation project will update the community-built park features with play structures accessible to children of all abilities, ages 2-5 and 5-12. The intent is to maintain the charm of the small park and enhance the safety and play area accessibility in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Play area will be closed during construction. Location 6029 21st Ave SW, 98106 Budget Seattle Park District provides $300,000 for planning, design and construction. Schedule Planning & Design: Spring - Summer 2018Construction: Fall 2018 Project Description The renovation project will update the community-built park features with play structures accessible to children of all abilities, ages 2-5 and 5-12. The intent is to maintain the charm of the small park and enhance the safety and play area accessibility in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Community Participation Offer input for this project at the Puget Park Play Area Renovation Project Survey if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_2'); }); }

Seattle Parks and Recreation is looking for public input on playground renovations being planned for Puget Ridge Playground at 6029 21st Ave SW.<p>Two …

Thief takes tools At 7:50 a.m. on Tuesday, March 27, a caller reported a burglary in the 9800 block of 39 Ave SW. She said that at 6 a.m., she noticed that the stockroom supply door was open. Then, she discovered that a number of power tools were missing. No surveillance camera footage was available. Officers searched the area but were unable to earn more. Mailbox burglar The manager of a building located in the 4800 block of California Ave SW called police at 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 27. He said that when he arrived at the apartment building in the morning, he noticed that mailboxes had been pried open. There were five separate panels of mailboxes and all had been pried open. The victim then watched security footage from the night before. He saw that the suspects entered the building around 2 a.m. and used a screwdriver to access the mailboxes. They left a few packages open in the lobby but took a number of packages. Officers took photographs and found fingerprints, which were uploaded into evidence. Burglars strike twice Officers received a call at 7:45 a.m. on Sunday, March 25 regarding a burglary in the 3800 block of 55 Ave SW. The homeowner said that the storage shed at the property has been burglarized twice within 24 hours. During the second time, thieves took a number of items. The victim was trying to make the shed more secure, but the burglar returned and struck again. No information about the suspect is available. Burglarized while away A woman residing in the 2700 block of 60 Ave SW returned home at 7:50 a.m. on Sunday, March 25 from a trip to find her house had been burglarized. She left at 9 p.m. the night before and came back to find her laptop missing. She tried to locate her computer on her phone and eventually it showed up at the intersection of 40th Ave SW and SW Morgan St. Then, it was turned off. The victim said that her window does not lock, and she has to use a board to secure it. She forgot to put the board back in the window before leaving for her trip. She did not think that anything else was stolen. if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_5'); }); }

<b>Thief takes tools</b><p>At 7:50 a.m. on Tuesday, March 27, a caller reported a burglary in the 9800 block of 39 Ave SW. She said that at 6 a.m., she noticed …

By Lindsay Peyton Questions are swirling about Sound Transit’s light rail project in West Seattle. Susan Staples, who has lived in the neighborhood since 1986, is worried about preserving the view that first attracted her to the area. “That’s why you come out here,” she said. “It’s a part of the community’s identity. West Seattle has always been known for its views.” Staples hopes that Sound Transit will consider tunneling instead of building an overhead track for the rail. “Having this above ground would be absurd,” she said. “This area is about the views. It’s about being able to see the water. That’s why a lot of us moved here.” West Seattle resident Kathy Kelleher wonders whether bus routes will be eliminated when the light rail opens. She explained that this is already an issue in her neighborhood. She said her bus stop went from being nearby to six blocks away. “It used to be right around the corner,” she said. Area residents brought a number of concerns to light during a recent meeting of the Admiral Neighborhood Association. Attendees asked about everything from parking available along the route to possible lane reductions due to the pilings for the light rail track. Larry Wymer, Admiral Neighborhood Association president, shared more information about proposal made by the Junction Neighborhood Organization (JuNO) to move the elevated track underground. Wymer also serves as treasurer for the West Seattle Transportation Coalition Board and as a council member of the Seattle Southwest District Council. The presentation noted that the proposed elevated alignment could interfere with pedestrian walkways and would intersect the cultural center of the Junction, passing by the historic buildings now occupied by Easy Street and Cupcake Royale. Instead of going above ground, Wymer said the track could tunnel underground near Genesse St’s intersection with SW Avalon Way. Tunneling would save 60 homes from destruction, he said. He explained that the Junction Neighborhood Organization also wants the plan to include building up commercial centers in West Seattle, allowing the Light Rail to be used both ways, instead of simply taking commuters downtown to work. “We’d increase employment opportunities so trains are just full of people leaving West Seattle,” Wymer said. Amanda Sawyer, president of the Junction Neighborhood Organization, has lived in the area for a year and a half. “How does a neighborhood grow but still retain its character?” she asks. She is also concerned with protecting green space while accommodating a rising population. She and Rich Koehler created the tunneling proposal, along with architectural artist Tomasz Biernacki, who prepared the graphics. Sawyer encourages area residents to become active participants in this project. “They’ve [Sound Transit] gotten off on the right foot looking for community input,” she said. “It’s really a lot to think about, and hopefully that will inspire more people to get involved.” if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_2'); }); }

<b>By Lindsay Peyton</b><p>Questions are swirling about Sound Transit’s light rail project in West Seattle.<p>Susan Staples, who has lived in the neighborhood …

You can race around or build a turtle; But be sure you know where you are headed

<b>By Patrick Robinson</b><p>Ever since I was in second grade and the teacher wrote on my report card, “Patrick seems to spend a lot of time daydreaming” I’ve …

Posters

Taste of West Seattle 2018 Tickets

<b>Support your local community through the West Seattle Helpline</b><p>This event is a fundraiser to help West Seattle families facing one-time emergencies …

Seattle

Marsalis is a band on the cusp of fame; Like many, making it in the music business is an elusive goal

So, what's been happening for Marsalis is the process of building awareness through sheer determination and perserverance. Back before there was a …

Music

Southgate Roller Rink will celebrate seven years with Top Knot Fest

Southgate Roller Rink will celebrate its seventh anniversary with Top Knot Fest March 30. The event will feature two stages of Northwest+ punk, …

Numb

Doesn’t the world seem kind of crazy these days?

<b>By Ken Robinson</b><p><b>Managing Editor</b><p>You don’t have to be a parent to feel a palpable sense of grief over the deaths of school children at the hands of a …

Guns

No Small Change

<b>By Jean Godden</b><p>Seattle is a seven-letter word that means change. This city changes visibly overnight. Drive down a familiar arterial street and, …

Urban Design

Brass Knuckle Bistro opens in White Center

<b>Brass Knuckle Bistro</b> is now open in White Center at 9602 16th Ave SW and offers something new to the neighborhood in that it's a completely scratch …

Sandwiches

Portal to the Emerald City during a storm on 2/25/18. Photo by David Rosen of SlickPix Photography https://t.co/riNVmiDwo3

Sportswatch:Sports events worth keeping an eye on Week of 2-26-18

<b>By Tim Clinton</b><p><b>SPORTS EDITOR</b><p>High schools<p><b>Girls basketball</b><p>West Seattle High School will wait until the state quarterfinals on Thursday at 7:15 p.m. to …

College Sports

Full moon over Seattle. Photo by Patrick Robinson https://t.co/Pavp36ne9u

Robbery in dark parking lot Around 1:20 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 20, officers were dispatched to the 4700 block of California Ave SW. The victim said that he was robbed at gunpoint in a bank parking lot. He and his girlfriend had just left a party and were walking back to his apartment, when he noticed a man in his peripheral vision. The suspect approached and demanded the victim’s cell phone. The suspect had a gun in his waistband. The man then asked for the victim’s wallet. The victim dropped his phone and wallet on the ground. The suspect picked them up and then asked for the victim’s wristwatch. Once he obtained it, he told the victim to leave. The suspect left in a white Honda Accord with a missing back plate. The victim ran to his apartment and borrowed a phone from a passerby to call 911. Then, he used an app to locate his phone at 4 Ave S and S Mead. Officers went to the location and found the car described by the victim, which turned out to be a vehicle that had been reported stolen. Officers called to impound the car. There were no witnesses of the crime. Thieves take tools A man remodeling a home in the 3800 block of 40 Ave SW called police around 6 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 20 to report a burglary at the property. He had surveillance footage of the crime, which occurred around 1 a.m. An unknown man entered the home through a back door, forcing it open and then grabbing a bucket containing tools before he left. The victim showed officers the damage to the door. He was not sure how many tools were stolen. The victim emailed officers the surveillance footage, which was submitted into evidence. Burglary on 18th Ave Officers arrived in the 8800 block of 18 Ave SW around 8 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 19 after receiving a call about a burglary. The victim said she left home at 7:30 a.m. When she returned at 7:30 p.m., she discovered that her kitchen window was broken. There was glass shattered on the floor. Her husband cleaned up the mess and placed plastic over the window. The victim had not noticed anyone around her residence, nor did the neighbors. Officers checked for fingerprints but were unable to find any. Robbery and assault on California Ave SW Officers are investigating a robbery that occurred in the 4000 block of California Ave SW around 1 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 18. The victim was at his residence on 34 Ave SW. He said that after midnight the night before, a close female friend arrived at his apartment, bringing with her a man he did not know. She said that the man was homeless and asked if he could stay the night at the victim’s house. He felt uncomfortable about the question but invited both to come inside. He offered to give the man $50 to find a hotel, but he only had a $100 bill. The three went to a gas station on California Ave SW to get change. When they realized the shop was closed, they walked north to find a bar to break the bill. They walked about eight blocks until they found a place to go. When he came back from the bar, the suspect grabbed him by the back of his jacket and repeatedly slammed his head against a parked box truck. The victim gave him all his money. The suspect then kicked him and pushed him into a puddle, before running away. The victim said he has not seen the woman or man since the robbery. He said they were both about 19 years old. if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_2'); }); }

<b>Robbery in dark parking lot</b><p>Around 1:20 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 20, officers were dispatched to the 4700 block of California Ave SW. The victim said …

Fund the Future Auction Highland Park Improvement Club 1116 S.W. Holden St. Sat., Feb. 3, 6–9 p.m. The future is whatever you make it, and the Highland Park PTA is trying to make it a good one for every child in our school family. Immediate needs at our Title 1 school include building our first playground, funding experiential environmental education for our 5th grade class, and supporting school-wide STEAM enrichment programming. Because time traveling is just too dangerous, dress in digs from your favorite era and join us for a night of fundraising games, silent auction items, yummy bites, and tempting sips. We even have a donation option for folks whose flux capacitor is out of order that evening! Tickets include heavy appetizers, all drinks, and are presale only. Get yours at fundthefuture.brownpapertickets.com/. Family Resource Center Enrichment Programs Family Resource Center at Neighborhood House High Point 6400 Sylvan Way S.W. Join the Family Resource Center for our free Enrichment programs offered in partnership with the Woodland Park Zoo, Seattle Art Museum, Seattle Aquarium, Seattle Children’s Theatre, and Seattle Parks and Recreation Department. Programs are designed for children 3 to 5 years old, however children of all ages are welcome to attend with their parents or caregivers. Woodland Park Zoo Tues., Feb. 6, 10:30-11:30 a.m. The Woodland Park Zoo will be joining us with a visit from an ambassador animal! Children will listen to a story, learn about the ambassador animal, and then take turns touching it. For more info call 206.588.4900 ext. 3010. The Seattle Children’s Theatre Tues. Feb. 13, 10:30-11:30 a.m. The Seattle Children’s Theatre will be visiting the Family Resource Center to present a Story Drama Workshop. Facilitators will tell an animated, interactive story to young listeners who are encouraged to engage and act along. For more info call 206.588.4900 ext. 3010. The Other Alcott by West Seattle author Elise Hooper Seattle Public Library, High Point Branch 3411 SW Raymond St. Thurs., Feb. 8, 6 p.m. Marking the 150th Anniversary of the publication of Little Women, Elise Hooper will present her novel, The Other Alcott (William Morrow, Sept. 2017), about May Alcott, an artist and Louise May Alcott's sister. This free book-talk event by Words, Writers & West Seattle co-sponsored by the Southwest Seattle Historical Society and the Seattle Public Library. For more info call Dora-Faye Hendricks at 206.290.8315 or by e-mail at Dora-Faye@comcast.net. SINGING & LEARNING ABOUT AMERICAN MUSIC: HONORING AFRICAN AMERICAN VOCAL TRADITIONS Admiral Congregational UCC 4320 SW Hill St. Sat., Feb. 10, 1–4:30 p.m. American music is deeply rooted in the musical traditions of African American culture. Through the joyful act of singing, we can embody the values embedded in these songs and gain greater understanding of how this music influences political and social struggle and creates community. Led by Pamela Gerke, Admiral Choir Director. $10 donation To register email officemgr@admiralchurch.org or call 206.932.2928. —ONGOING FREE EVENTS— Community Dining in the “Junction Diner” Senior Center of West Seattle 4217 S.W. Oregon St. Come join us for lunch in the Senior Center of West Seattle’s Junction Diner “Sound Generations.” The Community Dining program at the Senior Center of West Seattle is where those aged 60 and up can enjoy an affordable, nutritious meal with other older adults. Guests enjoy a hot, made-from-scratch meal prepared by our amazing Chef, Francisco Briseno and learn about other fun events and activities. Before joining us, please make a reservation. You may call 206.932.4044 ext. 1 or walk in and sign up. There is no membership fee or commitment required. Lunch is free with a suggested donation of $5 for those aged 60 and older. For those under the age of 60, there is a nominal fee of $10. Have a birthday coming up? Ask about our Monthly Birthday Lunches and other special events! Active Dad’s Play Group Neighborhood House High Point 6400 Sylvan Way S.W. Every Thurs., 10 a.m.–Noon. Join this group of dads, infants and children for socializing and open play at Neighborhood House High Point in West Seattle.Free and open to anyone who wishes to attend. La Leche League: Free Breastfeeding Support Group Neighborhood House High Point 6400 Sylvan Way S.W. Every fourth Mon. 10:30 a.m.–Noon. Join this group of new moms for mother-to-mother support. Free and open to anyone who wishes to attend. For free breastfeeding help or information contact Betsy: 206.932.9912; info@lllwa.org. Beginner ESL Class Roxhill Elementary School 30th Ave. S.W. Every Tues. and Thurs., 12:30 p.m.–2 p.m. Beginner classes. Free childcare is provided. If you or anyone you know of is interested in signing up for class or participating as a volunteer instructor please contact megand@nhwa.org via email or call the Family Center: (206)588-4900 ext. 3010. Pre-Lit ESL Class Neighborhood House High Point 6400 Sylvan Way S.W. Every Mon., 1–2:30 p.m. and Wed., 10–11:30 a.m. Pre-literate classes for individuals who are just starting to learn to speak, read, and write English. If you or anyone you know of is interested in signing up for class or participating as a volunteer instructor please contact megand@nhwa.org via email or call the Family Center: 206.588.4900 ext. 3010. Enrichment Classes for 0-5 year olds Neighborhood House High Point 6400 Sylvan Way S.W. Every Wed., 10 a.m.–Noon.Join this group of parents, caregivers and children ages 0-5 for free enrichment classes On the first and third Wed., we offer art classes for children to experiment with color and materials, with a focus on process and expose to encourage in children a desire to create. Art starts at 10:00. Stay to play. On the second Wed., Nathalie, High Point Children’s Librarian, hosts story time with books and songs. On the fourth Wed., join us for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) themed activities. In March, children will be planting seeds to take home and watch grow. Job Support Neighborhood House High Point 6400 Sylvan Way S.W. Every Tues., 2–4 p.m. Are you looking for a job? Do you need support in enrolling in college or a training program? Work one-on-one with a coach and get help searching for opportunities, filling out applications, creating a cover letter and resume, practicing interview skills and more. You are also welcome to use our computer lab with free use of Wi-Fi, printing, fax, scanning, and copying. You might also be interested in dropping in for Open Lab and Resource Connections Every Wed. and Fri. from 2–4 p.m. to use our computer lab and learn about local resources for low-income individuals and families. Drop-in or call to sign up: 206.588.4900 ext. 3010. Kiwanis of West Seattle Weekly Meeting The Sisson Building/Senior Center 4217 S.W. Oregon St. www.kiwaniswestseattle.org Every Wed., 6:30–7:30 p.m. Guests Welcome. People dedicated to community service, and we have FUN, too! Sponsor Key Clubs at local High Schools plus many activities to support our community.Established in West Seattle in 1929. Years and years of service to the community. Come check us out! Information: Denis Sapiro, 206.601.4136. West Seattle Block Watch Captains’ Network S.W. Police Precinct 2300 S.W. Webster St. Every fourth Tues., 6:30 – 8 p.m. Our special guest will be Alex Voorhees from the King County Prosecutor’s office. Serial burglars and auto thefts will be our big topics of discussion. She’ll provide an overview of how their office deals with serial offenders—especially offenders involved in property offenses (burglary, auto theft and prowl and ID theft). Everyone is welcome, even if you aren’t a Block Watch Captain! RSVP is appreciated, but not necessary to attend. You can email us at wsblockwatchnet@gmail.com. Early Days Parent Support Group Meetings Nurturing Expressions 4746 44th Ave. S.W., Suite 201 425.243.2355 Every Mon., 10:30 a.m.–Noon (except federal holidays). Early Days uses the MotherWoman format to facilitate an honest discussion of the realities of parenting. Trained facilitators work to create a comfortable environment for folks to share whatever is going on for them, free of judgement or advice. You are not alone! All moms (birth, adoptive, foster) who experience emotional challenges are welcome. Come join a circle of parents that are having similar feelings and challenges! Support people and partners welcome! Suggested donation $10; no one turned away. www.TheEarly Days.org / Facebook: EarlyDays WS / earlydaysws@gmail.com. District Council Meetings Youngstown Cultural Arts Center 4408 Delridge Way S.W. Third Wed., 7–9 p.m. Representatives from neighborhood councils and other community organizations provide reports on what issues and concerns they are working on and announcements about up-coming community meetings and events. Stay-at-home dads Hiawatha Playfield Playground 2700 California Ave. S.W. Every Mon. and Thurs. at 9 a.m. A resource and community for stay-at-home dads, fathers who are primary caregiver in their family, and other involved dads are welcome. All fathers are invited. Alzheimer Caregiver Support Group Providence Mt. St. Vincent, 4831 35th Ave S.W. Third Thurs. of the month, 1–2:30 p.m. Caring for someone with memory loss? Do you need information and support? Alzheimer’s Association family caregiver support groups provide a consistent and caring place for people to learn, share and gain emotional support from others who are also on a unique journey of providing care to a person with memory loss. For information call Kristine Kumangai at 206.937.3701 ext. 28345. Volunteer with Food Lifeline to end hunger in Western Washington Every Mon.–Fri., 8:45 a.m.–Noon and 12:45–5 p.m. 40% of food in America goes to waste. You can help change that by volunteering with Food Lifeline’s Fresh Rescue program. Local grocery stores donate perishable and shelf-stable products, including produce, dairy, meat and bakery items. Volunteers work alongside a trained staff to inspect and pack grocery donations for immediate distribution to 275 local food assistance programs. For more information or to sign up to volunteer, please email our volunteer team at volunteer@foodlifeline.org or visit www.foodlifeline.volunteerhub.com. —ONGOING PAID EVENTS— Daystar Toastmasters Daystar Retirement Village 2615 SW Barton Sat., Nov. 18, 10–11 a.m. Come as a guest on to experience the safe, supportive atmosphere in which you can grow your communication and leadership skills. Improve your ability to think-on-your-feet and become more comfortable speaking to groups. Arrive 5 to 10 minutes early for orientation. For more information see daystarclub.toastmastersclubs.org. or call Bill at 206.932.6706. West Seattle TOPS Meeting Providence Mount St. Vincent 4831 35th Ave. S.W. Every Tues. evening, 5:30–7p.m. Everyone is welcome to join us at our “Take Off Pounds Sensibly” weekly meeting, an encouraging weight loss support group. Weigh-in 5:30–6 p.m., Meeting 6–7 p.m. Our group encourages healthy living and loss of pounds, with accountability via our weekly weigh-ins. Informative programs, challenges, awards, encouragement and lots of FUN! TOPS is an extremely affordable program. Convenient and free parking. For more information contact: Linda at 206.932.3021 or Jane at 206.938.4439. West Seattle Lion’s Club Events Senior Center of West Seattle 2nd floor 4217 S.W. Oregon St. Thurs., Noon–1:30 p.m. for lunch and speaker unless otherwise noted. Call Harvey Rowe at 206.762.1221 for reservations by prior Tues. evening. Lunch $7. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Guadalupe Church Pastoral Care Center 7000 35th Ave. S.W. Every Tues., 9:30 a.m. TOPS is an encouraging weight loss support group with weigh-ins every Tuesday. For info: 206.932.2621. Overeaters Anonymous Meetings Peace Lutheran Church 8316 39th Ave. S.W. Every Thurs. evening, 7–8:15 p.m. Overeaters Anonymous is a fellowship of women and men who meet to help solve compulsive overeating (obesity, anorexia and bulimia). The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop eating compulsively. OA is a non-profit international organization patterned after the Twelve-Step Alcoholics Anonymous program. All are welcome. For more info 206.979.6665 or www.seattleoa.org. AARP Defensive Driving Workshop Daystar Retirement Village 2615 S.W. Barton St. First Sat. of every month, ongoing, 9–5:30 p.m. $15 for members, $20 non-members. Call 206.937.6122 for info or to RSVP. Business Network with Westside Professionals Alki Masonic Hall 4736 40th Ave. S.W. Every Wed., 8–9:30 a.m. Build your business through referrals and networking. For info, contact sfelix@quidnunc.net. Join the West Seattle Lion’s Club Senior Center of West Seattle 4217 S.W. Oregon St. 206.762.1221 Meets every Thurs., Noon–1:30 p.m. Irish Dance Lessons West Seattle VFW Hall 3601 S.W. Alaska St. Every Mon. and Tues. in the late afternoon and early evenings. Open to children and adults. Information at 206.851.2102. Daystar Toastmasters Daystar Retirement Village 2615 SW Barton Sat., Dec. 16, 10–11 a.m. Come as a guest on to experience the safe, supportive atmosphere in which you can grow your communication and leadership skills. Improve your ability to think-on-your-feet and become more comfortable speaking to groups. Arrive 5 to 10 minutes early for orientation. For more information see daystarclub.toastmastersclubs.org. or call Bill at 206.932.6706. if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_2'); }); }

<b>Fund the Future Auction</b><p><i>Highland Park Improvement Club</i><p><i>1116 S.W. Holden St.</i><p><b>Sat., Feb. 3, 6–9 p.m.</b> The future is whatever you make it, and the Highland …

By Jean Godden Things move quickly in the age of internet. Ideas move so fast that no sooner does a worthy cause emerge than a backlash arises to question its validity. Such is the case with the #MeToo movement. The hashtag MeToo was created 10 years ago by civil rights activist Tarana Burke. Her idea was to let a young victim of sexual assault know she was not alone. Burke thought of the hashtag as a way to empower black and brown women who had experienced sexual abuse. The movement was not universally adopted at first. It languished for a decade. Then it was reborn following revelations of Harvey Weinstein's deplorable behavior. Actress Aylssa Milano responded, reviving the hashtag as an awareness campaign to help people realize the magnitude of the problem of sexual harassment and abuse. The campaign has reemerged as an enlightened movement, designed to support those who speak out, as well as to censure those who misbehave. There is a long list of the latter, centering on political and entertainment arenas, but extending into academia, arts, the media, medicine, technology, journalism and the restaurant industry. The MeToo movement swept the nation, taking off in October. It reached a high point at the end of the year with Time Magazine naming "the silence breakers," women who have spoken out, as persons of the year. MeToo has sparked a genuine cultural revolution, an upheaval of gigantic proportions. It aims to quell misogyny and inequality. That's the good news. The bad news is that the backlash, which may have been predictable, arrived in January. Negative response surfaced within a mere four months. One counter attack erupted after a woman called "Grace" -- not her real name -- told about a date gone awry with comedian Aziz Ansari. Grace's lament, detailed in Babe, a feminist website, alleged sexual misbehavior, but not an assault. Grace's account struck a nerve, partly because it tagged Ansari -- himself co-author of "Modern Romance," a book about dating in the digital age. if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_2'); }); }

<b>By Jean Godden</b><p>Things move quickly in the age of internet. Ideas move so fast that no sooner does a worthy cause emerge than a backlash arises to …

Lee RobinsonEditor’s note: This column appeared in the Oct. 3, 1958 edition of the White Center News. The author is our mother Lee Robinson. She wrote a periodic column about life. She died at age 46. By Lee Robinson This age when the wilder speculation and fancies of man become realities is a constant source of wonder. As we struggle to survive and keep pace with the rapid changes, I sometimes wonder where we’re all going—where will it lead? What happens next? I was talking to a fellow just the other day and he knows where he's going. He strikes me as a type who has the determination, positive attitude and plain old-fashioned grit to get there. We were lunching together and suddenly he slammed his fist down on the gable and stated in ringing tones “I’m going to the moon!” I’ll have to admit I laughed. I’m sorry now. I could see I had offended him. He scowled at me and his lower lip jutted out. I’ve seen him do that before—it’s a sure sign that nothing can change his mind. Apparently we wan’t discouraged tho, for he related his statement almost defiantly. Soberly, I asked “But how?” “Rocket” was the terse reply. He isn’t much of a talker and prefers to take action right now. Well, it’s nice to know somebody who knows what he wants and where he is going. This fellow may make it. He has a long time to plan. Not too long ago, I saw him up on our roof, reaching for the stars—probably calculating distances. Like I said, he has a long time to make plans. He was two years old last May. *** Every now and then I encounter someone who tries to convince me that cats are snobs. Imperious creatures who will have no truck with us human types. A pox on them. They haven’t met our four (count ‘em, four) cats. Now I am a feline fancier of the fanciest type, in fact. And my steady beau is a canine cuddle. Natcherly, he is not overly fond of sharing his board with our furry friends. These cats will eat anything any time and all the time. I have even caught them looking slyly at me a time or two. If I even glance toward the kitchen, they race madly for the cupboard and roll cans of Puss and Boots around the room. Since they are not fed on any set schedule, our home is a monument to chaos. They remind us in plaintive and persistent tones that chow time is due. Recently, we tried to adopt a policy of making them sleep outside. This is pretty effective if we seal ourselves in by bolting all windows and doors. It is disconcerting to hear a voice in the pitch black of night, just as I have dozed off, “Someone is standing on my eyeballs.” I SAID—SOMEONE IS STANDING ON MY EYEBALLS AND BREATHING HIS FISHY BREATH IN MY FACE.” (Come to think of it—it’s pretty funny, too.) He has hinted to Charles Brown, boy Bassett Hound, that he could be helpful in escorting the cats off into the toolies. But Charles is no fool—he likes cats like crazy—and he knows the majority rules. if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_2'); }); }

<b>Editor’s note: This column appeared in the Oct. 3, 1958 edition of the White Center News. The author is our mother Lee Robinson. She wrote a periodic</b> …

By Lindsay Peyton Area business owners are convinced that the sugar tax is having an unintended consequence: hurting the small shops that operate on the border of Seattle’s city limits. A few business owners gathered on Friday, Jan. 26 to voice their concerns. Most were members of the “Keep Seattle Livable for All” coalition, a group banding together to protest the city’s new tax. The group’s spokesman Jim Desler kicked off the news conference, which was held in the parking lot of A Pizza Mart, 9452 35th Ave SW. “We’ve seen the impact,” he said. “We want to give a voice to those who are most vulnerable.” Peter Lamb, a representative of Teamsters Local 174, said that the sugar tax will take a toll on small businesses and those who work wage jobs. Most at risk of having an adverse effect are businesses located on city borderlines, Lamb said, as consumers can simply go a block away for cheaper beverages. “They’re traveling outside the city to avoid the tax,” he said. “And who wouldn’t?” And they’re not just buying soda across the city’s border, they’re buying all their groceries in one place, Lamb added, making an even greater impact on small businesses than just missing the profits from soda. “It’s the plight of the neighborhood store owner we want to draw your attention to,” he said. Jagajit Sing, owner of A Pizza Mart, said her business has already been affected by the tax, which was enacted less than a month ago, on Jan.1. “Many of my customers will simply choose not to come to my store,” she said. She explained that all employees of food services, restaurants, groceries and convenience stores are feeling the pressure of the tax. Gurdev Singh Mann, an owner of two convenience stores, said his customers are also going outside the city to buy drinks. “I feel like every single day my sales go down,” he said. “Even my regular customers are very upset.” He is especially concerned because he felt that the city should have been more proactive in educating residents about the measure. “The way they came up with the tax was behind closed doors,” he said. Daniel Kim, general manager of the Korean Grocers Association, said that many customers are confused by the upcharge and end up leaving their drinks on the counter and walking out upset. “A tax like this makes it even more difficult to make a profit in this city,” he said. “It’s just more and more difficult.” Prem Singh, who owns a 7-Eleven in Ballard, has also felt a hit from the tax. “We see an impact already,” he said. “We saw this in the very first week. Our sales dropped dramatically.” He said that he will have to reduce his labor costs to help counteract the loss. He is convinced that the tax will lead to job loss in a number of stores and restaurants. “We should do something immediately to stop this,” he said. Lamb is calling on the city to start a thorough review of the tax immediately. “This tax doesn’t make any sense in any way, shape or form,” he said. Lamb said that he is not against the nonprofit organizations benefitting from the tax. Rather, he said the funding for these initiatives should not come from small businesses that cannot handle negative impacts from the tax. if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_2'); }); }

<b>By Lindsay Peyton</b><p>Area business owners are convinced that the sugar tax is having an unintended consequence: hurting the small shops that operate on …

The Fauntleroy Boulevard Project which would have created a major traffic issue for a minimum of 18 months in even the best case scenario has been put on hold by the Seattle Department of Transportation. Citing potential conflicts with the planning for light rail coming from Sound Transit the agency released the news in a statement on Wednesday, Jan 30. "Based on community input and continued coordination with Sound Transit, we are putting construction of the Fauntleroy Boulevard Project on hold. This decision responds to community concerns about prolonged construction and effective use of taxpayer dollars. Sound Transit’s current proposed route for the voter-approved light rail extension to West Seattle includes an elevated rail line on Fauntleroy Way. If built after the Fauntleroy Boulevard Project, there is the possibility that Fauntleroy improvements would need to be removed and potentially rebuilt. During our recent design outreach, we heard community concerns about dealing with major construction twice in such a short amount of time. The community also asked whether constructing the Fauntleroy Boulevard Project now, and potentially having elements of the project removed later, would be an effective use of public dollars. Our decision to put construction on hold will help to ensure that SDOT’s and Sound Transit’s plans for this stretch of Fauntleroy Way don’t conflict. We recognize West Seattle has multiple paving and transit priorities, and we will reallocate Fauntleroy Boulevard Project funds to address the community’s needs. Sound Transit is still in the early stages of their design for light rail to West Seattle, and they anticipate choosing a preferred alignment by mid-2019. Last month, the City announced plans to work closely with Sound Transit over the next 18 months to identify a preferred route for the light rail tracks and stations to the West Seattle Junction. If you have any questions or concerns, please email us at fauntleroyblvd@seattle.gov or call our project phone number at (206) 727-3994. if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_2'); }); }

"Based on community input and continued coordination with Sound Transit, we are putting construction of the Fauntleroy Boulevard Project on hold. …

Information from USCG Coast Guard air and boat crews rescued one woman and recovered one man after their 15-foot paddleboat was reportedly beset by weather near Three Tree Point in Burien, Wash., Sunday morning. An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Air Station Port Angeles and a Station Seattle rescue boat crew aboard a 45-foot Response Boat-Medium responded to the incident and transferred both mariners to local Emergency Medical Service personnel. Coast Guard Sector Puget Sound watchstanders received initial notification from King County Dispatch at 2:53 a.m., reporting two individuals aboard a paddleboat potentially beset by weather. Sector personnel established communication with the mariners via cell phone and reported hearing a loud scream before losing connection. Once on scene, the Coast Guard aircrew discovered the capsized vessel near Seahurst Park. At 4:51 a.m., the aircrew located an unresponsive female in the water and vectored in the boat crew to rescue her. The crew transported her to the Fauntleroy Ferry dock where a local EMS crew was waiting. At 5:02 a.m., a male was recovered by the helicopter crew and transported to Boeing airfield where he was pronounced dead by a local EMS crew at 5:38 a.m. The female is reportedly in critical condition and is being treated at Harborview Medical Center hospital. if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_2'); }); }

Information from USCG<p>Coast Guard air and boat crews rescued one woman and recovered one man after their 15-foot paddleboat was reportedly beset by …

Bartell Drugs has named Kathi Lentzsch as Chief Executive Officer. Bartell moved their corporate headquarters to 4025 Delridge Way SW in West Seattle in 2012. Brian Unmacht, the only person from outside the Bartell family to ever run the 127-year-old company, stepped down last April after two years on the job. Lentzsch comes to Bartell after serving as interim CEO of Gump’s, a San Francisco based luxury specialty store and direct-to-consumer retailer. She has more than three decades of retail experience previously serving as President, CEO and board member for Berkeley, California's Elephant Pharmacy, Executive VP of Merchandising for Cost Plus World Market, Senior VP of merchandising at Pottery Barn, and VP of Merchandising at Pier 1 Imports. Bartell Drugs chairman George Bartell said in a statement, “Kathi’s experience as a CEO and the breadth of her retail experience will be ideal for leading Bartells. She brings a record of transforming businesses through innovation and entrepreneurial agility. This will be instrumental in growing the Bartells brand as the local chain expands its reach in the Puget Sound region.” Bartell Drugs operates 64 drug stores in King, Snohomish and Pierce counties if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_2'); }); }

Bartell Drugs has named Kathi Lentzsch as Chief Executive Officer. Bartell moved their corporate headquarters to 4025 Delridge Way SW in West Seattle …

information from Southwest Seattle Historical Society Marking the 150th Anniversary of the publication of Little Women, Elise Hooper will present her novel, The Other Alcott (William Morrow, Sept. 2017), about May Alcott, an artist and Louise May Alcott's sister. This free book-talk event by Words, Writers & West Seattle co-sponsored by the Southwest Seattle Historical Society and Seattle Public Library takes place at 6PM at the High Point Branch, 3411 SW Raymond St. (Raymond and 35th), on Thursday, Feb. 8, 2017. The complicated relationship among sisters and the one shared by the Alcott sisters of Concord, Massachusetts inspired Louisa May Alcott as she wrote her classic novel Little Women. However, instead of focusing on Jo March, a character based on Louisa herself, Amy is often the least favorite sister. Hooper's first novel tells the truth about Louisa’s sister, May. The other Alcott sister, May, is stylish, outgoing, creative, and grows up longing to experience the wide world beyond Concord. While her sister Louisa crafts stories, May is a talented and dedicated artist and faces scorn for entering what is very much a man’s profession. Author Elise Hooper has lived in West Seattle since moving to the Pacific Northwest in 2001 and now lives with her husband and two young daughters within stone-skipping distance of Puget Sound. When she's not writing, Elise is in her classroom trying to make American history and literature interesting for high school students. She's drawn to historical figures, especially women, who linger in the footnotes of history books yet have fascinating stories waiting to be told. The Other Alcott is Hooper's first novel Words, Writers & West Seattle's future book-talks are all scheduled for the Second Thursday of each month at 6 PM at the Southwest Branch of the Seattle Public Library, 9010 35th Ave. SW, West Seattle, WA 99126. On March 8, 2018, Peter Stekel will present Beneath Haunted Waters (Globe Pequot, 2017), a WWII aviation mystery. For videos on these and other authors' presentations visit: www.loghousemuseum.info/events/words-writers-and-west-seattle. Additional information on future presentations can be obtained by contacting Dora-Faye Hendricks, Chair, 'Words, Writers & West Seattle" by phone at 206-290-8315 or by e-mail at Dora-Faye@comcast.net. if (typeof googletag !== "undefined") { googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('js-dfp-tag-in_story_5'); }); }

<i>information from Southwest Seattle Historical Society</i><p>Marking the 150th Anniversary of the publication of Little Women, Elise Hooper will present her …