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What They Never Told You About The Great Depression

Just how bad was the Great Depression? Well, that depends on which historian you consult, what sort of political leanings that economics or political website happens to have, and which group of 1930s society you're actually talking about. The historical recollections of the Great Depression have changed over time, and a lot of what we used to believe has turned out to be wrong. Here is a list of some of the most common misconceptions about that awful decade.

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    • Great Depression
    • 20th Century
    • Franklin D. Roosevelt
    • American History
    • History
What They Never Told You About The Great Depression

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    False Things You Believe About The Great Depression

    False Things You Believe About The Great Depression

    No matter how bad things get, always remember, they could be worse. Way, way, worse. The world could have ended back in the 80s during some dumb nuclear misunderstanding or something. The world could end today for pretty much the same reason. Global infrastructure could collapse and leave us all in the dark. There could be zombies. Well, that last one would actually be kind of cool but never mind. No matter how bad things get, they could always get even worse. And they have, too. You just have to look to the past and you'll find plenty of great examples. The Great Depression is one of them.

    How Policymakers Accidentally Made The Great Depression Worse

    How Policymakers Accidentally Made The Great Depression Worse

    The Great Depression that began in 1929 was a global fiscal event that was worst felt in the U.S. and Europe. A multitude of factors played into what would be the severest downturn in U.S. history. However, it may be said that the failure of the Gold Standard to which the economy was tied was at the heart of the matter, leading to a 47% drop in industrial production and a nearly one-third decline in the country's gross domestic product (GDP). The result was panic in the financial sector, widespread joblessness, and horrifying poverty. Despite this, in 1937, it seemed as though the worst had passed. There were emerging signs of something resembling a recovery, with rising employment figures and increases in industrial output both contributing to a sense that the Great Depression was coming to an end.

    What Life Was Really Like For Families During The Great Depression

    What Life Was Really Like For Families During The Great Depression

    Over the course of a few short weeks in 1929, the stock market crashed and the Great Depression rocked the United States. Banks went under, and patrons lost all the money they had earned. As businesses failed and workers lost their jobs and livelihoods, people were forced to try to find any work they could to support their families, feed their children, and keep a roof over their heads. For some, the task was impossible: Many Americans became homeless, living on the road or in ramshackle tent cities known as Hoovervilles. All around the country, people were struggling.

    Bizarre Things That Happened During The Great Depression

    Bizarre Things That Happened During The Great Depression

    For a lot of people in the first world, "hardship" is when the internet goes out for the afternoon or when the grocery store runs out of avocados. Of course, this isn't really hardship — just look at the dismal years people suffered through during the Great Depression. Jobs were few and far between, life savings disappeared in an instant, and starvation was a very real thing. That's hardship. Still, in between all the uncertainty, the fear, and the heartbreak, some seriously weird things happened.

    The Aftermath Of The Great Depression Is More Messed Up Than You Know

    The Aftermath Of The Great Depression Is More Messed Up Than You Know

    "The Great Depression," said Vanderbilt economics professor Robert Margo, "is to economics what the Big Bang is to physics." The reactions by governments around the world to the worst global economic downturn in history have become not merely the basis for modern economic theories across the spectrum but also for the political, economic, and cultural realities of billions of people for the rest of the 20th century.

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