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The biggest scandals to ever hit the History Channel

Long ago, when the internet was young and facts still had meaning, there was a television network known as the History Channel. It featured shows about history. You know, past events that actually happened in real life? The channel specialized in documentaries about wide-ranging subjects, like World War II and its aftermath. It had adequate ratings and a solid audience of dads.

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The biggest scandals to ever hit the History Channel
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    The Biggest Scandals To Ever Hit The History Channel

    The Biggest Scandals To Ever Hit The History Channel

    Long ago, when the internet was young and facts still had meaning, there was a television network known as the History Channel. It featured shows about history. You know, past events that actually happened in real life? The channel specialized in documentaries about wide-ranging subjects, like World War II and its aftermath. It had adequate ratings and a solid audience of dads. But then something happened (extraterrestrial intervention?), and the History Channel began to pivot away from strictly historical programming. Instead, we were presented with a slew of reality shows about pawn shops, swamp people, and truckers driving on icy roads, plus a whole bunch of incoherent "documentary" series about how aliens built the pyramids (they didn't) and how Bigfoot was finally captured by scientists (he wasn't).

    Times The History Channel Lied To You

    Times The History Channel Lied To You

    If you count yourself among the legions of debt-saddled millennials who slashed cable television out of their bills about a decade ago, you probably think of the History Channel as being a continuous 24/7 stream of World War II documentaries. But over the years, a lot has changed over at the big H. While History.com continues to be a well-sourced encyclopedic resource of everything that's ever happened, the website's TV counterpart has become ... well, if the old History Channel was a do-gooder straight-A student, the new History is a cranky old conspiracy theorist who secretly binges reality shows.

    Where These History Channel Stars Are Today

    Where These History Channel Stars Are Today

    Since its inception in 1995, The History Channel has been popular with TV fans who are fascinated by the secrets of the past. The network is known for its documentary series, which have focused on everything from major turning points like World War II to niche subjects like alleged alien encounters. It has also been recognized for its striking historical dramas, such as The Bible and Vikings. However, it's perhaps most famous for its reality TV programming. Many of its shows, such as Pawn Stars and Ice Road Truckers, give audiences a peek into the daily lives of people with fascinating jobs. Others, such as Alone and Top Shot, are intense competitions that test skills like wilderness survival and marksmanship.

    What Nobody Told You About History Channel's Mountain Men

    What Nobody Told You About History Channel's Mountain Men

    If you're looking to get lost in the untamed, frozen wilderness of North America without ever leaving the warmth of your living room, you're probably tuned into History Channel's "Mountain Men." This 10-season hit reality show traces (and sometimes even traps) the lives of unlikely superstars who aren't just offline. They're completely off the grid. These are the homesteaders, wildlife hunters, and stockpilers, who are carving out lives in some of the most uninhabitable places around.

    History Channel's Ridiculous Theory About Amelia Earhart's Disappearance

    History Channel's Ridiculous Theory About Amelia Earhart's Disappearance

    2017 had all the makings of a basic cable Cinderella story for The History Channel. Sure, they'd had their ups and downs, having strayed from their original path as an educational programming outlet. Yes, most of their content consisted of alien conspiracy theorists and pawn shop employees giving community theater-level reads on quippy one liners like "awkward!" and "oh no he didn't!" And it's true that the seemingly bottomless well of docu-series figuring out the real truth of the whereabouts of Adolf Hitler had finally run dry, somewhere between "he's still alive and working at a Church's in Jacksonville" and "he got hit by a Pontiac Fiero walking out of a Wawa in 1986."

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