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The Battle Of Waterloo Finally Explained

In 1814, a Russo-Prussian-Austrian coalition defeated Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Leipzig and forced the emperor into captivity on the tiny Italian island of Elba. Undeterred, Napoleon escaped exile a year later and found his way back to Paris, where he mustered his old veterans into a new army to confront the inevitable coalition that would rise to oppose him before he could consolidate his position. Nearly all of Europe opposed Napoleon, but only Britain, Prussia, the Netherlands

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The Battle Of Waterloo Finally Explained
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    The Battle Of Waterloo Finally Explained

    The Battle Of Waterloo Finally Explained

    In 1814, a Russo-Prussian-Austrian coalition defeated Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Leipzig and forced the emperor into captivity on the tiny Italian island of Elba. Undeterred, Napoleon escaped exile a year later and found his way back to Paris, where he mustered his old veterans into a new army to confront the inevitable coalition that would rise to oppose him before he could consolidate his position. Nearly all of Europe opposed Napoleon, but only Britain, Prussia, the Netherlands, and a few small German states mustered to fight him. The two sides met in Belgium near a village called Waterloo.

    Weird Things About Napoleon You Didn't Know

    Weird Things About Napoleon You Didn't Know

    Given that the guy conquered nearly all of Europe, Napoleon is one of those historical figures we should all probably know a lot more about. But for most of the non-French world, the "Little Corporal" is today nothing more than fodder for jokes about short guys with certain complexes (unfair, given that he was average height), and yet another cautionary tale for why invading Russia in winter is just a really terrible idea.

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