Erna Peters

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2018 Golden Globes A-Z: Everything You Need to Know

A<p><b>Ansel Elgort:</b> The <i>Divergent</i> and <i>The Fault in Our Stars</i> is nominated for Best Actor in a Motion Picture, Musical or Comedy for his performance in the …

10 books to read before they become movies in 2018

If one of your New Year’s goals is to read more, then you have some quality pages to turn this year.<p>From childhood classics to action-packed adventures, 2018 has some exciting book-to-film adaptations, featuring stars such as Oprah Winfrey, Tom Hanks, Jennifer Lawrence and Chris Hemsworth. Kick off …

Books

Writers Are Self-Loathing: 50 Writers on Writers, in Fiction

Writers don’t have the best reputation and they have no one to blame but themselves. Instead of writing stories where writers are attractive, heroic, and strong, they describe the writers within their own works as eccentric, depressed, reclusive, broke, and egotistical.<p>Much like I do in my new book</i> …

The Essential Ernest Hemingway from Biography to Fiction

Ernest Hemingway stands as one of the most influential writers of the twentieth century and, in his personal life, a character of near mythic status. The man called “Papa” was often as much idolized for his uber-masculinity and hard-charging, restless persona as his sparse, affecting prose. He was …

Steve Jobs

• <b>Auteur:</b> Walter Isaacson<p>De enige geautoriseerde en volledige biografie over Steve Jobs. Walter Isaacson heeft de afgelopen drie jaar exclusieve en unieke gesprekken voerde met Jobs, zijn familie en vrienden, om een beeld van de mens Steve Jobs te krijgen. Maar Isaacson heeft ook gesproken met …

Free at Last: The Robert Redford Story

He's always been obsessed with the American way of winning and losing, the blessing also being the curse. It's the subject of much of his career and the substance of much of his life. PLUS: The Exclusive Never-Before-Seen Photos of Redford from 1959<p><i>Published in the April 2013 issue</i><p><b>The war is over,</b> …

Paris Review - James Salter, The Art of Fiction No. 133

Interviewed by Edward Hirsch<p>Issue 127, Summer 1993<p>James Salter is a consummate storyteller. His manners are precise and elegant; he has a splendid New York accent; he runs his hands through his gray hair and laughs boyishly. At sixty-seven he has the fitness of an ex-military man. He tells …

Listen: Sylvia Plath Reads "Daddy"

Lawrence Ferlinghetti Turns Down 50,000 Euro Poetry Prize

By Sadie Stein October 12, 2012<p>Lawrence Ferlinghetti has declined the fifty-thousand-euro Janus Pannonius International Poetry Prize from the Hungarian branch of PEN, citing the government’s suppression of free speech.<p>Bret Easton Ellis is most seriously displeased: despite his aggressive …

Paris Review - Alice Munro, The Art of Fiction No. 137

Interviewed by Jeanne McCulloch and Mona Simpson<p>Issue 131, Summer 1994<p>There is no direct flight from New York City to Clinton, Ontario, the Canadian town of three thousand where Alice Munro lives most of the year. We left LaGuardia early on a June morning, rented a car in Toronto, and drove for …

Paris Review - Susan Sontag, The Art of Fiction No. 143

Interviewed by Edward Hirsch<p>Issue 137, Winter 1995<p>Susan Sontag lives in a sparsely furnished five-room apartment on the top floor of a building in Chelsea on the west side of Manhattan. Books—as many as fifteen thousand—and papers are everywhere. A lifetime could be spent browsing through the books …

Paris Review - John le Carré, The Art of Fiction No. 149

Interviewed by George Plimpton<p>Issue 143, Summer 1997<p>John le Carré was born in Poole, England, on October 19, 1931. He had a gloomy childhood, thanks to the disruptive motions of his father, an erratic businessman who kept the family moving from place to place. After attending a series of private …

Paris Review - Paul Auster, The Art of Fiction No. 178

Interviewed by Michael Wood<p>Issue 167, Fall 2003<p>In 1985, after seventeen New York publishers had rejected <i>City of Glass</i>, the lead novella in The New York Trilogy, it was published by Sun and Moon Press in San Francisco. The other two novellas, <i>Ghosts</i> and <i>The Locked Room</i>, came out the next year. Paul …

Paris Review - Simone de Beauvoir, The Art of Fiction No. 35

Interviewed by Madeleine Gobeil<p>Issue 34, Spring-Summer 1965<p>Simone de Beauvoir had introduced me to Jean Genet and Jean-Paul Sartre, whom I had interviewed. But she hesitated about being interviewed herself: “Why should we talk about me? Don’t you think I’ve done enough in my three books of …

Our Editors Select The Best Books Of 2012

It's awards season in the book world, with the National Book Awards in November and The Nobel Prize in Literature announcement. We figured now was as good a time as any to reflect on the books we've read this year (and as book editors, we've read a lot!), and determine which, in our opinion, are …

Paris Review - William Faulkner, The Art of Fiction No. 12

Interviewed by Jean Stein<p>Issue 12, Spring 1956<p>Mr. Faulkner’s self portrait, 1956.<p>William Faulkner was born in 1897 in New Albany, Mississippi, where his father was then working as a conductor on the railroad built by the novelist’s great-grandfather, Colonel William Falkner (without the “u”), …

Paris Review - Gabriel García Márquez, The Art of Fiction No. 69

Interviewed by Peter H. Stone<p>Issue 82, Winter 1981<p>Gabriel García Márquez was interviewed in his studio/office located just behind his house in San Angel Inn, an old and lovely section, full of the spectacularly colorful flowers of Mexico City. The studio is a short walk from the main house. A low …

Paris Review - Julian Barnes, The Art of Fiction No. 165

Interviewed by Shusha Guppy<p>Issue 157, Winter 2000<p>Photograph by Ellen Warner<p>Julian Barnes lives with his wife Pat Kavanagh, a literary agent, in an elegant house with a beautiful garden in north London. The long library where the interview was conducted is spacious and quiet. Overlooking the garden, …

Why Does the Short Story Survive?

<i>The medium isn't as popular as it used to be, but a new anthology from</i> The Paris Review <i>makes the case for the power and promise of short stories. Below, an interview with editor Sadie Stein.</i><p>Random House<p>A new anthology from the editors of <i>The Paris Review</i> showcases the verve and variety of a …

Paris Review - John Irving, The Art of Fiction No. 93

Interviewed by Ron Hansen<p>Issue 100, Summer-Fall 1986<p>John Irving, ca. 2010. Photograph by Jost Hindersmann<p>John Irving was interviewed in the cramped back room of his otherwise large and luxurious apartment in Manhattan. A jump rope hangs on the door, a heavy set of weights “is always in the way” on …

007, Moby-Dick, Literates

By Sadie Stein October 19, 2012<p>The handwritten contract for <i>Moby-Dick</i>.<p>The top ten literary parodies! (Warning: highly subjective and skews very British. But then, it would.)<p>Watch the trailer for <i>Midnight’s Children</i>. In the words of one YouTube commenter, “can b a gud movie for literates.”<p>In news …

Paris Review - Jeffrey Eugenides, The Art of Fiction No. 215

Interviewed by James Gibbons<p>Issue 199, Winter 2011<p>At the MacDowell Colony in 1994.<p>Born in Detroit in 1960, Jeffrey Eugenides lived through the city’s last glory years as the heart of the American auto industry. His first two novels, <i>The Virgin Suicides</i> (1993) and <i>Middlesex</i> (2002), are rooted in …

Paris Review - Joseph Heller, The Art of Fiction No. 51

Interviewed by George Plimpton<p>Issue 60, Winter 1974<p>Joseph Heller, ca. 1986<p>This interview with Joe Heller took place during the week of the publication of <i>Something Happened</i>—a literary event of considerable significance, because the novel is only the second of the author’s career. The first, of …

Paris Review - Kazuo Ishiguro, The Art of Fiction No. 196

Interviewed by Susannah Hunnewell<p>Issue 184, Spring 2008<p>Ishiguro in 2005.<p>The man who wrote <i>The Remains of the Day</i> in the pitch-perfect voice of an English butler is himself very polite. After greeting me at the door of his home in London’s Golders Green, he immediately offered to make me tea, though …

Paris Review - Joan Didion, The Art of Nonfiction No. 1

Interviewed by Hilton Als<p>Issue 176, Spring 2006<p>Didion in her bedroom.<p>The last time this magazine spoke with Joan Didion, in August of 1977, she was living in California and had just published her third novel, <i>A Book of Common Prayer</i>. Didion was forty-two years old and well-known not only for her …

Short Stories: 'The Paris Review' Creates A Great New Compilation

Short stories, when done well, can be perfect narratives, captured in miniature. So when <i>The Paris Review</i> recently released their new book, <i>Object Lessons: The Paris Review Presents the Art of the Short Story</i> (Picador, $16), it instantly became one of our books of the year. It features authors …

Paris Review - John Cheever, The Art of Fiction No. 62

Interviewed by Annette Grant<p>Issue 67, Fall 1976<p>PHOTOGRAPH BY NANCY CRAMPTON<p>The first meeting with John Cheever took place in the spring of 1969, just after his novel <i>Bullet Park</i> was published. Normally, Cheever leaves the country when a new book is released, but this time he had not, and as a result …

Paris Review - Alberto Moravia, The Art of Fiction No. 6

Interviewed by Anna Maria de Dominicis & Ben Johnson<p>Issue 6, Summer 1954<p>Alberto Moravia, 1954.<p>Via dell’Oca lies just off the Piazza del Popolo. A curiously shaped street, it opens out midway to form a largo, tapering at either end, in its brief, cobbled passage from the Lungotevere to a side of …

Paris Review - Max Frisch, The Art of Fiction No. 113

Interviewed by Jodi Daynard<p>Issue 113, Winter II 1989<p>Max Frisch, ca. 1961. Photograph by Jack Metzger<p>Max Frisch was born in a suburb of Zurich, Switzerland, on May 15, 1911. By the age of twenty-six he had published two works, the novel <i>Jürg Reinhart</i> (1934), and <i>Answer from Silence</i>, a novella (1937), …

Paris Review - François Mauriac, The Art of Fiction No. 2

Interviewed by Jean Le Marchand<p>Issue 2, Summer 1953<p>“Every novelist ought to invent his own technique, that is the fact of the matter. Every novel worthy of the name is like another planet, whether large or small, which has its own laws just as it has its own flora and fauna. Thus, Faulkner’s …