M

149 Flips | 3 Magazines | 1 Follower | @fischeye | Keep up with M on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “M”

Do Millennial Men Want Stay-at-Home Wives?

Millennials, generally defined as people born between 1982 and 2000, were supposed to be the generation that forged what has been called “a new national consensus” in favor of gender equality. Indeed, in February the prominent Columbia professor Jeffrey Sachs labeled the 2016 election, where an …

AP Classes Are a Scam

The College Board earns over half of all its revenues from the courses—and, in an uncertain environment, students keep being suckered.<p>Fraudulent schemes come in all shapes and sizes. To work, they typically wear a patina of respectability. That's the case with Advanced Placement courses, one of the …

What Does It Take to Climb Up the Ladder?

What drives success? Cognitive skills are important, but so are harder-to-measure strengths that fall under the heading of what is sometimes called character.<p>Richard V. Reeves, of the Brookings Institution, has been doing research on the persistence of social and economic disadvantage for a long …

Why the white middle class is dying faster, explained in 6 charts

The complicated collapse of middle-aged white Americans.<p>In 2015, a blockbuster study came to a surprising conclusion: Middle-aged white Americans are dying younger for the first time in decades, despite positive life expectancy trends in other wealthy countries and other segments of the US …

The Forces Driving Middle-Aged White People's 'Deaths Of Despair'

In 2015, when researchers Anne Case and Angus Deaton discovered that death rates had been rising dramatically since 1999 among middle-aged white Americans, they weren't sure why people were dying younger, reversing decades of longer life expectancy.<p>Now the husband-and-wife economists say they have …

Middle Age

For First Time In 130 Years, More Young Adults Live With Parents Than With Partners

For the first time in more than 130 years, Americans ages 18-34 are more likely to live with their parents than in any other living situation, according to a new analysis by the Pew Research Center.<p>In that age group, 32.1 percent of people live in their parents' house, while 31.6 live with a spouse …

Demographics

‘Segregation Had to Be Invented’

During the late 19th century, blacks and whites in the South lived closer together than they do today.<p>CHARLOTTE, N.C.—Growing up here in the 1940s and 1950s, Sevone Rhynes experienced segregation every day. He couldn’t visit the public library near his house, but instead had to travel to the …

New York City’s paid sick leave law has hardly affected employers at all. Win!

Over the past decade, the movement for paid sick leave has been one of American progressives’ greatest policy triumphs. Since San Francisco first …

America Is Even Less Socially Mobile Than Most Economists Thought

And as a result, the policies that would address the situation are even more extreme—and more politically unfeasible.<p>Sociologists and economists are probably psyched that the work they’ve been doing on inequality and social mobility for decades has finally gotten attention from the average …

Income Inequality

Conquering the Freshman Fear of Failure

Although it’s been a long time, I vividly recall my reaction when I learned that I had been admitted to Amherst College: The admissions office must have made a terrible mistake.<p>I had graduated from a Long Island high school where most students didn’t go to college, so I was convinced that at …

World Population Growth

First published in 2013; updated April, 2017.<p>200 years ago there were less than one billion humans living on earth. Today, according to UN …

How welfare has changed since 1996, in three charts

<i>Note: This piece originally ran in 2016, we're reposting it this week in light of updated welfare data.</i><p>Twenty years ago, the federal government took a pretty simple cash welfare system — if you were poor and had children, you were guaranteed a welfare check — and replaced it with a program called …

Bill Clinton

Scientific Studies: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

Car Rationing Experiment Backfires In Polluted New Delhi

New Delhi has the most polluted air of any city in the world. NPR explores whether rationing cars in the Indian city could solve the problem.<p>Transcript<p>ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:<p>In the U.S., almost 90 percent of households have a car. In India, that figure is only 6 percent, but it is growing steadily. …

Shifting Parent Work Hours, Mom vs. Dad

Articles about stay-at-home dads and parents with even work loads might make it seem like dads are putting in a lot of hours in the household these …

Parenting

The World Has a Problem: Too Many Young People

AT no point in recorded history has our world been so demographically lopsided, with old people concentrated in rich countries and the young in not-so-rich countries.<p>Much has been made of the challenges of aging societies. But it’s the youth bulge that stands to put greater pressure on the global …

For Many Schools The Recession Never Ended

Let's begin with a choice.<p>Say there's a check in the mail. It's meant to help you run your household. You can use it to keep the lights on, the water running and food on the table. Would you rather that check be for $9,794 or $28,639?<p>It's not a trick question. It's the story of America's schools in …

Education

Life Expectancy Study: It's Not Just What You Make, It's Where You Live

Poor people who reside in expensive, well-educated cities such as San Francisco tend to live longer than low-income people in less affluent places, according to a study of more than a billion Social Security and tax records.<p>The study, published in <i>JAMA</i>, the Journal of the American Medical …

Demographics

It’s time for an ambitious national investment in America’s children: Investments in early childhood care and education would have enormous benefits for children, families, society, and the economy

Introduction and key findingsNearly 7 years into the recovery from the Great Recession, two glaring problems remain in the U.S. economy. One is a …

Income Inequality

Denying Housing Over Criminal Record May Be Discrimination, Feds Say

The Department of Housing and Urban Development is making it easier for people with criminal records to find housing.<p>In new guidance, released Monday, HUD tells landlords and home sellers that turning down tenants or buyers based on their criminal records may violate the Fair Housing Act.<p>Because of …

How to level the playing field for working families

I graduated from law school nine months pregnant with my second baby — and 100 percent unemployable. In 1976, no law firm was going to offer a job to …

Building Up and Tearing Down

The real-estate boom of the early 2000s and subsequent crash left a number of lasting effects on Chicago. It created a rolling tide of up-scale condo …