Justin Sawyer

66 Flips | 2 Magazines | 3 Following | 49 Followers | @dynamitejet | Keep up with Justin Sawyer on Flipboard, a place to see the stories, photos, and updates that matter to you. Flipboard creates a personalized magazine full of everything, from world news to life’s great moments. Download Flipboard for free and search for “Justin Sawyer”

Earth - Are massive squid really the sea monsters of legend?

For centuries, fishermen from Norway and Greenland have told tales of a terrifying sea monster: the kraken. Supposedly, this vast creature has giant tentacles that can pluck you from your boat and drag you to the depths of the ocean. You can't see it coming, because it lurks deep beneath you in the …

Whales

Why Icelanders are wary of elves living beneath the rocks

<b>Plans to build a new road in Iceland ran into trouble recently when campaigners warned that it would disturb elves living in its path. Construction work had to be stopped while a solution was found.</b><p>From his desk at the Icelandic highways department in Reykjavik, Petur Matthiasson smiles at me …

Nitrogen: The bringer of life and death

<b>Nitrogen is one of the most paradoxical elements in the periodic table. Flames are extinguished and animals die in an atmosphere of pure nitrogen - so it was once known as "azote", Greek for "lifeless". And yet this colourless, odourless gas, making up 78% of the atmosphere, has a highly explosive</b> …

Nobel Prize

BBC iWonder - Human vs superbug: Too late to turn the tide?

Human vs superbug: Too late to turn the tide?<p>Presented byLiz BonninScience presenter<p>1. Antibiotics: End of the line<p>Presented byLiz BonninScience presenter<p>Antibiotics are important medicines that have been used to treat bacterial infections for 70 years. They work by either disrupting processes …

Microbiology

Google Glass: Why the gadget faces its biggest test

Will Google Glass catch on? With a backlash in full swing, there may be one thing that threatens the technology’s adoption more than anything else, argues Chris Baraniuk. And in the video above, BBC Click’s Spencer Kelly takes a look at how one airline is embracing the technology while some other …

Google Glass

Webdriver Torso YouTube mystery clips' French connection

http://vod-pro-ww-live.akamaized.net/mps_h264_hi/public/news/technology/1073000/1073349_h264_1500k.mp4?__gda__=1534399952_e566ed2513dd9fac643ecf4f95f10e10<p><b>On 23 September 2013 at 14:45, YouTube user Webdriver Torso quietly uploaded a video.</b><p>The mysterious 11-second sequence of red and blue rectangles …

Online Life

Sodium: Getting rid of dirt - and murder victims

<b>Be warned, this article contains material some readers may find distressing. That's because it's about sodium - and the story of one of Italy's most notorious serial killers illustrates elegantly some of this element's unique properties.</b><p>Sodium is highly reactive, which means the soft, …

Sodium

The spooky world of the 'numbers stations'

<b>This is the era of hyper-tech espionage, encrypted emails and mindboggling cryptography. But you can hear a very old-fashioned form of espionage on shortwave radio.</b><p>It is 13:03 on a Tuesday in a cramped room with some fairly advanced radio equipment. What is suddenly heard on a shortwave receiving …

The storyteller of Marrakech

<b>Storytelling in Marrakech is a practice with ancient roots, thought to date back to the 11th Century. But has it been superseded by modern life?</b><p>The Cafe de France in Marrakech is something of an institution. It is the oldest and most famous of the slightly louche establishments that surround the …

Film Festivals

The woman who lost a dog and gained 200 sloths

<b>Monique Pool first fell in love with sloths when she took in an orphan from a rescue centre. Since then many sloths have spent time in her home on their way back to the forest - but even she found it hard to cope when she had to rescue 200 at once.</b><p>It all began in 2005 when Pool lost her dog, a …

Moths

The English expressions coined in WW1

<b>World War One gave rise to expressions and slang such as blighty and cushy, but only some are still used, says Kate Wild, senior assistant editor of the Oxford English Dictionary.</b><p><b>Zepps in a cloud</b>, anyone? <b>Toot sweet!</b> But <b>liberty cabbage</b> - <b>no bon</b>.<p>If you're not sure what the last line means, you're not …

What do those squiggles on the pavement actually mean?

<b>Look down at British roads and pavements and there's often a slew of squiggles, dots and arrows, painted in a plethora of hues. But what do they actually mean?</b><p>In London alone, more than 50 different utility companies have the power to dig up the highway.<p>There are a lot of people who need to know …

How does the Thames Barrier stop London flooding?

<b>The Thames Barrier has been in record use over the past two months. How does it work?</b><p>A map released by its operator, the Environment Agency, in December showed how London would look if sea levels continued to rise and there was no barrier. The Houses of Parliament, the O2 arena, Tower Bridge, and …

North Sea

The Sahara memorial seen from space

<b>At 16°51′53.748″N 11°57′13.362″E in the Sahara desert there is an intriguing landmark - the outline of an aeroplane pointing in the direction of Paris. Visible on satellite pictures, this beautiful image, like a tattoo on the landscape, has been a viral hit.</b><p>It is a memorial to a flight that never …

Africa

The Brazilian ranch where Nazis kept slaves

<b>On a farm deep in the countryside 100 miles (160km) west from Sao Paulo, a football team has lined up for a commemorative photograph. What makes the image extraordinary is the symbol on the team's flag - a swastika.</b><p>The picture probably dates from some time in the 1930s, after the Nazi Party's rise …

Gulnara Karimova: How do you solve a problem like Googoosha?

<b>A year ago, the daughter of the Uzbek president was riding high - a businesswoman, a pop star with a catchy name, she was even seen as a possible future leader. But over the past 12 months all that's changed - her businesses closed, her official positions snatched away. Can she bounce back?</b><p>The …

Business tips from UK's oldest family firms

<b>Some of the UK's oldest family businesses have survived for almost 500 years. What have they been doing right to make them so enduring?</b><p>According to the Institute for Family Business (IFB), there are around three million family firms in the UK.<p>It says the 10 companies below are thought to be among …

Family Business

The allure of abandoned Tube stations

A collection of cultural artefacts<p>The New Year's Day episode of Sherlock included a plot line about abandoned London Underground stations. The eerie empty platforms and booking offices have enthralled photographers.<p>Without revealing any spoilers, the detective drama referenced the many stations …

10 truly bizarre Victorian deaths

<b>Life in Victorian times was arguably considerably more dangerous than now, if the newspaper reports of the time are anything to go by, writes Jeremy Clay.</b><p>A recent BBC News Magazine piece set out the dangers within the Victorian or Edwardian home. But there were plenty of ways to come a cropper …

Christmas Eve

100 down: The crossword marks its centenary

<b>One hundred years ago the first proto-crossword appeared in the New York World newspaper. Since then there have been millions of chewed pens and scratched heads.</b><p>A newspaper editor once told me the secret of keeping readers happy. You can shift a paper's politics, apparently, and you can get your …

Why border lines drawn with a ruler in WW1 still rock the Middle East

<b>A map marked with crude chinagraph-pencil in the second decade of the 20th Century shows the ambition - and folly - of the 100-year old British-French plan that helped create the modern-day Middle East.</b><p>Straight lines make uncomplicated borders. Most probably that was the reason why most of the …

Middle East

A tale of three murderers

<b>Three murderers were sentenced to life imprisonment on one day. The minimum terms set were 18, 27 and 40 years. Why were they so different?</b><p>On 28 November 2013, in separate courtrooms around England, three men were handed life sentences. Each was given a different minimum tariff before they could be …

Crime

Prism and privacy: What could they know about me?

<b>Leaked documents have suggested the US government is able to access details of smartphone and internet activity under the Prism scheme. But what can be found out about users in the UK and what other information is held?</b><p>The Prism allegations suggest US intelligence agencies had direct access to the …

Why do we value gold?

<b>Mankind's attitude to gold is bizarre. Chemically, it is uninteresting - it barely reacts with any other element. Yet, of all the 118 elements in the periodic table, gold is the one we humans have always tended to choose to use as currency. Why?</b><p>Why not osmium or chromium, or helium, say - or maybe …

British Museum

Egypt's new hijab-clad superheroine

<b>She's got comic strip superpowers, fights for justice and gives bad guys a hard time. If this makes you think of Catwoman, then think again - for this is a new kind of superheroine with a visible difference.</b><p>Meet Qahera - the hijab-wearing Egyptian comic-book character fighting back against crime …

Sexual Harassment

Mandela death: How a prisoner became a legend

<b>As the imprisoned Nelson Mandela became the face of a global campaign against apartheid, within South Africa a ban on his image meant people weren't sure what he looked like - and he became a mythological figure, recalls author William Gumede.</b><p>Nelson Mandela was very fond of telling a story of how, …

South Africa

Nicky Crane: The secret double life of a gay neo-Nazi

<b>He was the British extreme right's most feared streetfighter. But almost right up to his death 20 years ago, Nicky Crane led a precarious dual existence - until it fell dramatically apart.</b><p>The skinhead gang marched in military formation down the High Street clutching iron bars, knives, staves, …

Neo-nazism

What would the union jack look like if the Scottish bit were removed?

<b>Scotland's referendum on independence is now just over 10 months away, but the question of what might happen to the union jack has been largely overlooked. An association of flag experts, or vexillologists, has created a set of designs it hopes will encourage a discussion.</b><p>Some 400 years ago when …

Great Britain

Why are we more scared of raw egg than reheated rice?

<b>Twenty-five years ago minister Edwina Currie sparked a scare over salmonella in eggs and had to resign amid outrage from farmers and plummeting sales. The panic has shaped the way we think about food safety.</b><p>There are foods that people instinctively associate with the risk of poisoning - raw …

Environmental Health

60 years since 'bat's wings' became first BBC TV symbol

http://vod-pro-ww-live.akamaized.net/mps_h264_hi/public/news/entertainment/1033000/1033113_h264_1500k.mp4?__gda__=1534499952_97ed81228fd9e1d71c175e26294f9fc1<p><b>Sixty years ago today the BBC unveiled its first "television symbol" - a moving logo to identify a TV channel - nowadays known as an …

Posters