CSHL Newsletter

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Key cancer protector has an “Achilles’ heel”

Our bodies, fortunately, employ a number of protectors against cancer. A protein called PTEN is one of the strongest checks against prostate and lung …

A cancer like an “oatmeal raisin cookie”

Pancreatic cancer is like an oatmeal-raisin cookie, according to Professor David Tuveson, where the cancer cells are raisins. Just as oatmeal makes …

Molecules and a mission: Base Pairs podcast season 1

Just four simple DNA “letters”—the molecules that make up the base pairs of the double helix—are enough to convey the complex instructions for life. …

In cancer, one wrong makes a right?

The idea that the wrong number of chromosomes can give rise to cancer dates back over a century. We know now that most cancers do indeed have an …

Reversing Rett syndrome’s impairment of adult learning

Learning impairment is a deeply disabling component of Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder seen almost exclusively in females. As a result, …

A bank for cancer research

Scientists have been saying for years that they could learn a lot more about cancer if they had better access to samples and data from patients under …

From the Labdish Blog

Now available for binge-listening: Season 1 of <i>Base Pairs</i>. Read more.<p>http://labdish.cshl.edu/newsletter/from-the-labdish-blog/<p>article<p>en_US<p>LabDish: A …

Basic Research: From Our Labs to Doctors’ Hands

Just before the holidays, the FDA approved a drug that will save lives of young people with the severe form of a disease that causes muscles to waste …

Understanding How Zinc Affects How We Think

Poking out from many neurons in the brains are NMDA receptors, whose faulty operation has been implicated in disorders including Alzheimer’s, …

Our Genome’s Guardian Can Break Bad

A protein known as p53 has long held the grand title of “guardian of the genome” for the protection it provides against cancer-causing mutations. New …

For Alan Alda, Science Communication is a State of Mind

Alan Alda, famous for his role in the classic TV series “M*A*S*H” and the PBS series “Scientific American Frontiers,” recently received a 2016 CSHL …

Alan Alda and Roy Vagelos honored at 11th Double Helix Medals Dinner

Alan Alda, known as Hawkeye from the classic TV series <i>M*A*S*H</i> and host of PBS’s <i>Scientific American Frontiers</i>, and Roy Vagelos, retired chairman and …

American Museum of Natural History

More people will say “I used to have cancer”

That’s a major goal for Dr. David Tuveson, the new director of CSHL’s Cancer Center. After seeing too many patients with dismal options as a cancer …

Cancer

Get busy or get RNAi

All cells are either busy reproducing or “quiescently” waiting to reproduce. The latter category includes many critical cells in our bodies, like …

Biology

Emma’s Story: with science on her side, one little girl finds hope

Emma’s prognosis was grim. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) was crippling her and it seemed that nothing could stop it. That’s now changing thanks to an …

Science

No (real) moustache required to join the “Movember” party

Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer among American men, but most of the prostate cancer researchers at CSHL have zero risk of …

Cancer

Cancer can hijack our web-slinging immune cells

Immune cells called neutrophils have an amazing weapon: they can shoot out webs of DNA to capture invaders. But if neutrophils are Spider-Man, cancer …

The case for investing in young scientists

When he was just 27 years old, Adrian Krainer was offered the opportunity to run his own lab at CSHL. Research by his team has led to the development …

HIV/AIDS Research – Its History and Future

“I wanted to bring together scientists who fought the HIV/AIDS epidemic for 35 years to share their accomplishments and discuss the future of the …

The Claire Friedlander Family Foundation Donates $200,000 for New...

The Claire Friedlander Family Foundation Donates $200,000 for New Sequencer<p>CSHL Association Director Peter J. Klein is President of the Claire …

A theoretical physicist’s approach to breast cancer

Ideas borrowed from physics could help scientists improve treatments for breast cancer. Breast cancer is more than a group of rogue cells. They exist …

The brain circuit connects judgements with actions

“I won’t make <i>that</i> mistake again!” All of our experiences provide evidence that our brains use to weigh how best to act in the future. New research …

“Serendipity in Spades” brings $200K for disease research

Unexpected twists are an inevitable part of life. For Evelyn Witkin, life’s “crooked path” led to CSHL and, more recently, to a Lasker Prize. In her …

A focus on the “brakes” accelerates brain research

Without cells called inhibitory neurons, the brain would be like a car with no brakes: signals would zip around at great speed, crashing into one …

Remarkable results aid very sick children

Spinal muscular atrophy is the leading genetic cause of infant death, and a new drug called nusinersen may be the first effective treatment for it. A …

Medicine

Bold, fast, & cheap: A new way to map the brain

Mapping the 100 trillion or so connections between the neurons in the human brain has challenged the limits of even our most advanced technologies. …

DNA sequencing

A vital ally in the preprint revolution

The <i>New York Times</i> has described biologists using the Press’ preprint server bioRxiv as “rogues.” CSHL alumna and Nobel laureate Carol Greider and …

Women in Science

To treat pancreas cancer, block antioxidants

Antioxidants are all the rage among health food enthusiasts—but pancreatic cancer cells can’t seem to get enough of them either, a new study from the …

Making sure cancer drugs hit their target

Simply knowing that a new candidate drug for leukemia worked in laboratory tests wasn’t enough for Chris Vakoc and his team. They set out to pinpoint …

Cancer