Cole Everett

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Rover Curiosity sees Martian moon Phobos eclipse the sun

When Phobos passed in front of the sun, it created an annular or “ring” eclipse. That is, the sun’s surface appeared in a ring around the little moon …

Science Fair Projects: Winning Tips From Intel And Google Judges

We talked with judges from two of the world's most prestigious science fairs to get some tips on how to put together a great project and have an even better time.<p>Graphing calculator? Check. New binders? Check. While you're getting ready to go back to school, don't forget to start planning an …

Scientists Say They've Confirmed A New Element

Scientists in Sweden say they have confirmed a new, super-heavy element that was first proposed by Russian scientists in 2004. The element with the atomic number 115 has yet to be named.<p>In a press release, Lund University says a group of international scientists led by physicists from Lund …

The Week In Numbers: Scientists Grow A Brain, Element 115 Exists, And More

<b>4 millimeters</b>: the size of a three-dimensional, self-organizing model of a developing human brain grown in a lab using stem cells<p><b>10 octillion</b>: the number of two-megaton nuclear bombs that would need to explode simultaneously to match the sound of a supernova<p><b>225 million years</b>: the time it would take …

Gray Matter: Extracting Bismuth From Pepto-Bismol Tablets

There's heavy metal in the pink pills<p>Most modern medicines are carefully synthesized organic molecules so potent that each pill contains only a few milligrams of the active ingredient. Pepto-Bismol is a fascinating exception, both because its active ingredient is bismuth, a heavy metal commonly …

Researchers say fossil with tooth proves T. rex was predator

Was Tyrannosaurus rex a predator or scavenger? The question has been a point of controversy in the scientific community for more than a century.<p>"You see 'Jurassic Park,' and you see T. rex as this massive hunter and killer, as incredibly vicious. But scientists have argued for 100 years that he was …

The 20 big questions in science

1 What is the universe made of?<p>Astronomers face an embarrassing conundrum: they don’t know what 95% of the universe is made of. Atoms, which form everything we see around us, only account for a measly 5%. Over the past 80 years it has become clear that the substantial remainder is comprised of two …

10 Mind-Blowing Facts About The Solar System

The Physics Behind Waterslides

A lot of science goes into providing a safe trip down.<p><b>At the top of the Summit Plummet waterslide at Walt Disney World's Blizzard Beach in Orlando, Florida—which stands some 120 feet (37 meters) above the ground—thrill seekers have been known to turn back.</b><p><b>It's not hard to see why: The 12-story</b> …

Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Alexey Kashpersky (High-Res)

Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Alexey Kashpersky (High-Res).

Sideprofile of a phospholipid bilayer membrane with a few anchored proteins, Nuno Moreira

Sideprofile of a phospholipid bilayer membrane with a few anchored proteins, Nuno Moreira.

Simulating 1 second of real brain activity takes 40 minutes and 83K processors

A team of Japanese and German researchers have carried out the largest-ever simulation of neural activity in the human brain, and the numbers are …

Starbirth in the Carina Nebula (High Res)

Astrocytes (in red) are the most abundant cell in the brain and help support neurons (in green) by recycling old cellular byproducts and…

Astrocytes (in red) are the most abundant cell in the brain and help support neurons (in green) by recycling old cellular byproducts and regulating a healthy environment for neuronal function. Unlike other organs of the body where an injury results in a fibrous scar, the brain instead forms an astrocyte scar to promote neuron survival.<p><i>Image by Dr. Shelley Jacobs, McMaster University.</i>